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THE BRECHIN \^m^^ 

ALMANAC 



AND 



DIRECTORY 









peice O-sriE iFEiLsrisnsr" 




( 




■PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY 

^ BLACK & JOHNSTON 

40 HIGH STREET 
AND CITY PRESS PRINTING WORKS 



The Warmth of Pure Wool 



IS IN 



"PESCO" 

UNDERWEAR. 



NOTHING but Pure Wool or Silk Wool in 
it ; Nothing but good manufacture in it ; 
Nothing approaching surface finish on it. 
" PESCO " stands first amongst underwears 
of to-day for Comfort, Honest Service, and 
Sound Value. 

We carry a Full Stock of "PESCO" 
Underwear in all Garments and Sizes for 
Ladies, Gentlemen, and Children. 

Ladies 1 Combinations - 6/11 to 13/6 

Ladies' Vests - 4/6 to 7/6 

Gentlemen's Drawers - 5/11 to 10/6 

Gentlemen's Shirts - - 5/11 to 9/6 

Try " PESCO " next time, and know the comfort and 
satisfaction that quality brings. 

®®®®©®®®®®©@@®®®©®®®®® 

J. C. ROBERTSON, 

THE PILLARS, 
SWAN STREET. BRECHIN. 



Dr. J. Collis Browne's 




C«KTindng Medical 

Testimony with each 

bottle. 

OF ALL CHEMISTS, 
m, 2/9, 4/6. 

Always ask for and see 
you get 

Dr. J. COLLIS 
BROWNE'S 

ChlorocSyne — 

The ORIGINAL 



The BEST REMEDY 

known for 



The 

Reliable 
Family 
Medicine. 



COUGHS, COLDS, 

ASTHMA, BRONCHITIS. 



Effectually cuts short 

all attacks of SPASMS, 

HYSTERIA, 

and PALPITATION. 



The only Palliative in 

GOUT, NEURALGIA, 

TOOTHACHE, and 

RHEUMATISM. 



and 
ONLY GENUINE. 






Aets like a charm in 
DIARRHCE4, CHOLERA, 

and DYSENTERY. 






FEN MINGS' 
CHILDREN'S 
POWDERS 

are invaluable during; the pr riod of cutting the teeth, and at 

all other times. They PREVENT CONVU SIONS, are COOLING! 

and SOOTHING, and CONTAIN NOTHING INJURIOUS. 



Scld everywhere In Boxes at 1/?} and 2/9. With full directions. 



Ask yoi-r Chemist or Grocer for ■ FREE Copy of FENNINGS' EVERY 
MOTHER'S i OOK. It contains Valuable Hints on the Feeding an I Manage- 
ment of Infants. A Postcard ■ ill bring a copy if addre aed to 

ALFRED FENNINGS, Cowes, Isle Of Wight. 

LOOK FOR THE TRADE MARK, "A BABY IN A CRADLE." 



I 



{ 



THE BRECHIN 

ALMANAC & DIRECTORY 



FOR 



i 9 i 4 



CONTAINING 

LOCAL EVENTS FOB 1913 

PROFESSIONS AND TRADES DIRECTORY 

OBITUARY NOTICES OF TOWNSMEN AND NEIGHBOURS 

BRECHIN GENERAL DIRECTORY 

EDZELL DIRECTORY 

AND OTHER USEFUL INFORMATION 



BRECHI N : 

BLACK & JOHNSTON, PRINTERS AND PUBLISHERS 

40 HIGH STREET 



(Epitome of |Cocal (Ebents. 



DECEMBER 19T2. 

At a meeting of the Directors of Brechin Infirmary on 2nd, the 
question of utilising the Phthisis Ward of the Institution for patients 
sent by the National Health Insurance Committee was considered. 
The proposal did not seem to meet with much favour, but it was 
remitted to a small committee to get information on various points and 
report. 

Brechin Town Council, having given strenuous consideration to the 
question of an extended Golf Course for the town, about the beginning 
of the month employed an expert to look at several localities likely to 
prove suitable for laying out a course of 18 holes. The Convener of 
the Committee in charge of the remit duly reported and the matter 
dropped. 

Intense frost had prevailed for some time but gave way on 3rd. 
The temperature rose considerably but the remainder of the month, on 
the whole, was damp and cheerless. 

The Martinmas Feeing Market was held on 3rd. The attendance 
was large and wages showed an increase of 20/- to 30/-. Foremen got 
,£22 to ^23 10/- ; Second Men, ,£22 to ^23 ; Third Men, ^18 10/- to 
£20 10/- with perquisites. 

A most interesting Exhibition of the work of Scottish Photo- 
graphers was held under the auspices of the Scottish Photographic 
Federation in the Mechanics' Hall on 4th. Some very hne work by 
local members was shown. 

Maisondieu Lodge of Ancient Shepherds held a very successful 
Dance in Corona Hall on 6th. 

Under the auspices of the Brechin Literary Society, Mr. A. J. Young, 
M.A., Edinburgh, gave a very interesting lecture on the subject of 
" The Modern Novel " in the Mechanics' Hall on 6th. 

From the Annual Report of the Brechin Inhrmary, submitted to the 
meeting of Subscribers on 9th, it appeared that the capital funds of 
the Institution amounted to £11,975 13s nd. The expenditure during 
the year was £917 16s 6d, and the income ^664 6s jd — a deficiency of 
^253 9snd. 

The congregation of Maisondieu Church held a Sale of Work in 
Corona Hall on 14th in aid of their fund to provide a new Manse. 
^142 was realised. 

Brechin Musical Society gave a delightful rendering of Handel's 
■' Messiah" in the City Hall on 18th, to a large, critical, and very 
appreciative audience. 

Christmas Services were held in many of the Churches in the City 
on Sunday 22nd. 

There were great lejoicings at Denburn Works on the occasion of 
the wedding of Mr. John M. S. Duke of the firm of Messrs. D. & R. 
Duke, on the 26th, and the employees were entertaine~d to a Soiree 
and Ball in the City Hall. 



2 The Brechin Almanac and Directory for 19 1J/.. 

JANUARY 1913. 
New Year 1913 was ushered in at the Cross in the usual " spirited " 
manner. 

Brechin Grammar School and High School Former Pupils held 
their Annual Re-Union in the Mechanics' Hall on 3rd. The large 
company included F.P's. from all corners of the globe, and a pleasant 
time was spent. 

The Brechin Ex-Ploughmen's Association 'held their annual 
ploughing match at Little Haughmuir on 4th, and as usual the 
" veterans " gave an excellent display. 

Under the auspices of Lodge St. James', No. 123 of Free- 
masons, a Masonic Service was held in the Cathedral, on the evening 
of Sunday 5th, when an able and eloquent sermon was preached by 
the Rev. Dr. Coats, Chaplain of the Lodge, his theme being "The 
Wise Men from the East." 

A Lecture on " Dickens " was delivered by Mr, A. Blyth Webster, 
of Edinburgh University, in the Mechanics' Hall on 10th, under the 
auspices of the Literary Society. 

A most disastrous hurricane and snow storm commenced on Friday 
10th, and continued over Saturday, Sunday, and Monday. Much 
damage was done, the Telegraph and Telephone services being 
almost entirely suspended on account of the fall of poles and wires. 

The Members and Friends of the British Womens' Temperance 
Association held their Annual " Happy Afternoon " in the Temper- 
ance Hall on nth, when a happy afternoon, indeed, w r as spent under 
the presidency of Mrs. James Bruce. 

At a Congregational Soiree on 13th, following the Anniversary 
Services of the East U. F. Church, Mr. James Guthrie, J. P., was 
presented with an Illuminated Address along with a Silver Salver and 
enlarged Photograph of himself — gifts from the Congregation in token 
of their appreciation of his valuable services as a member and as an 
office-bearer of over 50 years standing. 

During the quarter ended, the Nurses of the Brechin Victoria 
Nursing Association had paid 1365 visits to 89 patients on the roll. 

The employees of the Caledonian Railway Co. in the Brechin 
district held their annual Re-Union in the City Hall on 17th. There 
was a very large attendance and a most pleasant evening was wound 
up with a spirited dance. 

During 1912 the number of crimes or offences recorded within the 
Burgh by the Police was 192 Proceedings were taken against 
225 individuals in all. 

The Members of the Brechin Burns Club celebrated " The 
Anniversary," with their usual enthusiasm, in the Mechanics' Hall on 
27th. The toast of " The Immortal Memory" was proposed by the Rev. 
James Landreth, Logie Pert, and a most enjoyable eveningwas passed. 

A delightful Comedy entitled " All-of-a-Sudden Peggy " was per- 
formed by a company of Amateurs in the City Hall on 29th and 30th. 
The caste was a most capable one and large audiences rewarded their 
efforts. The drawings were divided between the Funds of the Victoria 
Nursing Association and the Day Nursery. 



Epitome of Local Events. 



FEBRUARY, 



A very successful Concert was given on Saturday ist by the Junior 
Choir and Sunday School Pupils of the Cathedral. The programme 
was finely rendered and much appreciated. 

To mark the semi jubilee of the opening of St. Andrews Episcopal 
Church, special services were held in the Church on Sunday 2nd. 
Bishop Robberds, Bishop of Brechin and Primus of Scotland, 
preached morning and evening. 

The Directors of the Brechin Infirmary, at a meeting on 3rdj 
resolved to have the Phthisis Ward in the Institution licensed for the 
reception of patients under the National Health Insurance Act. 

Major F. Eady, R.M.L.I., Recruiting Officer in Scotland for the 
Royal Navy, gave a most interesting lecture on the History of and 
Life in the Royal Navy, in the Parish Churc+i Hall on 4th. 

The Brechin Select Choir held their annual Supper and Dance in 
the Corona Hall on 5th, when there was a large attendance of 
members and friends. 

At a meeting of the Directors of the Brechin Total Abstinence 
Society on 5th, a gift to the Society of ,£100 from Mr. James Guthrie, 
J. P., was intimated. 

Brechin Boy Scouts gave an enjoyable entertainment in the City 
Hall on 7th, to a very large audience. The performance included a 
Gymnastic Display, a Camp-Fire Concert, and a play entitled "The 
Scouts." 

The Town Council at their monthly meeting resolved to light the 
Ante- Rooms of the City Hall with electricity, the cost, per contract, 
to be £& 17s 6d. Gas was considered to be less clean and more 
dangerous. 

Lengthy negotiations between the Town Council and the Brechin 
Gas Co., Ltd., for the purchase and sale of the Gas Works, were 
broken off by the Town Council at their meeting on 12th. The final 
offer by the Town was ,£32.000, and as the Company declined to 
accept less than ,£33,500, the bargaining- ended. 

Under the auspices of the Brechin Literary Society, Mr. M. M. 
Gilchrist, A.R.C.M., Organist of Brechin Cathedral, lectured in the 
Mechanics' Hall on 14th, on the subject of " Music of 1500 to 170.0 
compared with Modern Music." The lecture was most informative 
and interesting and was illustrated by vocal and instrumental 
examples. 

St. James' Lodge, No. 123, of Freemasons, held their annual 
Dance in their Hall on 19th. 

The Brechin Amateur Opera Co. gave a most successful perfor- 
mance of " The Yeomen of the Guard " in the City Hall on 26th. 
The high standard of previous operatic productions was more than 
maintained. 

Brechin Factory Workers wages were raised 5 per cent, as from 
27th February. This welcome advance followed one of about 2% per 
cent, made the previous summer. 



The Brechin Almanac and Directory for 191£. 



MARCH. 

The closing meeting of the Session of the P.S A., was held on the 
afternoon of Sunday 2nd, when an interesting programme was pro- 
vided. 

Tuesday 4th, was the old Horse Causey Market Day — in name 
only, alas ! as there was not a single horse on the ground. 

The "Carlies' " Market fell on the 4th also; men were scarce, and 
wages, consequently, were up by a £1 or £2. Grieves got £42, 
Foremen ^38 to .£40; Horsemen ^36 to ^38, with the usual 
perquisites. 

Dwelling Houses, 31, 33, and 35 Damacre Road, with a gross 
rental of £30 10s, were sold by roup for .£325. 

" The Making of Citizens " was the title of a lecture delivered by 
Mr. James Taggart, Rector of the High School, at the closing 
meeting of the Winter's Course of Lectures, arranged by the 
Educational Committee of the Brechin Equitable Co-operative 
Society. 

Wintry weather prevailed during the early part of the month. 
There was extreme frost and a good deal of snow fell. 

Brechin Select Choir gave an excellent programme to a large and 
appreciative audience in the City Hall on the evening of 12th. 

Members of the Brechin Branch of the Independent Labour 
Party held an enjoyable " At Home " in the Temperance Hall on 14th. 
An excellent address was delivered by Mr. G. R. Shepherd, Organiser 
of the Party, Dundee. 

Over £65 was realised at a Sale of Work under the auspices of 
the Ladies of East U. F. Church, in the Hall of the Church, on 15th. 
The object was to aid the Funds for Women's Foreign Missions and 
Congregational Purposes. 

The proposal to lay out an 18 hole Golf Course came up again at 
a Town Council Meeting, and it was resolved to inquire as to the 
price of various sites, and then to get an expert to report on their 
suitability. 

Brechin Orchestral Society gave its annual Concert in the City 
Hall on 1 8th. The items of the programme were all of a high-class 
nature and excellently rendered. 

A 99 years' lease of the Paper Mill, at a rental of £350, and of 
the Inch Bleachfield at ^150, were exposed by roup on 19th, but 
there were no offers. 

The last entertainment for the season to the inmates of the 
Brechin Almshouse was given on 26th, when Mr. J. E Robertson's 
party contributed an excellent programme. 

The Ladies of the East Parish Church realised ,£49 from a Sale 
of Work for congregational purposes, held in the Church Hall on 
29th. 

The first of a series of Organ Recitals to be provided during the 
season in the Cathedral, was given on 31st, by Mr. W. Mundell, 
F.R.C.O., L.R.A.M., Organist of Kilmalcolm Parish Church There 
was a large and appreciative audience. 



Epitome of Local Events. 



APRIL. 

On ist, twenty shares, fully paid up, of the Brechin Laundry Coy., 
Ltd., were offered for sale by roup, at the Farmers' Mart, but there 
were no buyers. Ten £i shares, fully paid up, of the Farmers' Mart, 
were offered for sale and went at 15/- each. Sixty £1 shares in the 
Brechin Auction Mart, fully paid up, were sold at 20/- each. 

On the half-year's working of the Brechin and Edzell Railway, 
there was a credit balance of ,£465 18s id, which it was agreed to 
carry forward. 

Fine weather set in during the first week in April and enabled 
the farmers to push on their work. 

The Members of the Select Choir were entertained to a Social and 
Dance on 2nd, by the Conductor, Mr. W. J. Farquhar. A pleasant 
evening was passed, in the course of which Mr. Farquhar was pre- 
sented with a purse of Sovereigns and a handsome Silver Mounted 
Baton suitably inscribed. 

The Revenue of the Mechanics' Institution for the year was 
^172 2s. 8d., and the expenditure £173 6s. 8d. 

Andrew Cook, aged 21 years, belonging to Dundee, while engaged 
with other two men cutting timber on the Dun Estate, was, on 2nd 
inst., found to have been suffocated by the sulphutous fumes from a 
pail of coke, which had been placed overnight in the Laundry of Dun 
House, in which he slept, for the purpose of keeping the place warm. 
The other two men had a narrow escape. 

Annual letting of the grass parks for the season in the district, 
showed a distinct rise over rates of last year — something like 25 per 
cent, in some cases. 

W. F. Frame, the man whom everybody knows, on his annual 
visit to Brechin on 9th, gave a much appreciated entertainment to 
the inmates of the City Almshouse. 

Weather had been fine and summery for some time, but a change 
set in about the middle of the month and severe conditions prevailed. 
On nth a very severe snow storm occurred. 

The employees in the various departments of the Town Council 
were granted a rise of from 6d. to 1/- per week, at the meeting of 
Council on 14th. 

A Jumble Sale held by the Brechin Cricket Club in the Temper- 
ance Hall on 18th and 19th, realised .£36. 

The City Brass Band commenced their open air Concerts for the 
season with a programme at the Cross on the evening of 19th, and a 
Sunday afternoon sacred programme in the Park on 20th. 

Government grants for the year to the Board Schools were as 
follows: — Andover School, ^620 18s. nd. ; Bank Street School, 
^428 15s. 6d. ; Damacre Road School, £535 17s. 

During the year the Victoria Nurses had 237 cases under their 
care and 5137 visits had been paid. 

The Bowling season in Brechin commenced on 30th, when the 
Brechin Club played a match between President and Vice-President. 



6 The Brechin Almanac and Directory for 1914- 

MAY. 

The Annual Spring Holiday fell on 5th, when the weather, although 
dull, was mild and enjoyable. 

On Wednesday the 7th, the rain having been continuous for some 
days, the river Southesk began to rise, and continued so to do until 
Friday 9th, when it flooded River Street to such an extent that the 
inhabitants, for safety, had to leave their houses. The Inch, with the 
Papermill and Bleachfield buildings, were so badly flooded and 
damaged by the deposit of gravel and mud that is was days before 
operations could be resumed. The houses in River Street were 
under water, in some cases to the depth of 4 or 5 feet, and were 
rendered unfit for habitation for a long time. Large quantities of farm 
stock and produce were carried down the river and, altogether 
extensive damage was done, both in town and country, by this, the 
most disastrous flood within local memory. By Friday evening the 
water had subsided very considerably, but the Almshouse, Public 
Halls, and other places, had to be used as dormitories for those who 
had been forced to abandon their houses. 

For the second time the leases of the Paper Mill and Inch Bleach- 
field, belonging to the common good of the Burgh, were exposed 
for let by roup on 14th, at the reduced upset of ,£350 and £150 
respectively, but there were no offers. 

Re the proposed 18 hole Golf Course, an expert came, saw, and 
reported favourably on a proposed site, after which the Town Council, 
at their monthly meeting - , resolved to enlist the co-operation of 
several influential sporting, and other bodies in town and " wait and 
see " what could be done. 

,£39 14s 2^d, besides goods in kind, in the shape of farm produce, 
chaff for bedding, &c. , was collected for the relief of the sufferers 
through the flooding in River Street. 

Wednesday 21st was observed in Brechin as Victoria Day. Al- 
though the Public Works kept running, all the Offices, Shops, &c, 
were closed. The weather was not absolutely ideal for holiday 
making. 

Under the auspices of the Hope of Angus Lodge I.O.G.T. an 
" At Home " was held in the Temperance Hall on 21st, when stirring 
Temperance Addresses were given, and a pleasant evening was 
passed. 

By about the end of the month it was seen that Grouse prospects 
were none of the brightest. Disease and the quality of food obtain- 
able was having a serious effect on th« birds 

Brechin C.C. played their first match with Victoria, Dundee, on 
24th ; Brechin won, 83 to d^. 

A pretty display of Artificial Flowers, made and in the process of 
being made, was given in the City Hall on Friday and Saturday, 23rd 
and 24th, and on 26th and 27th, by the girls of Mr. John Groome's 
Crippleage and Flower Mission, London. A number of blind and 
cripple girls gave exhibitions in the art of artificial flower making. 

The'flitting term was on 28th, when there were apparently rather 
more removals than usual. 



Epitome of Local Events. 



JUNE. 

The Whitsunday Feeing Market was held on 3rd. The weather was 
good, but the market being the last in the district, the attendance 
of masters and men was smaller than usual. What feeing was done 
was at a rise of £2 to £3. First horsemen got £24 to £25 10s ; 
second, ,£22 to £24 ; third, ^20 to ,£21 10s ; halflins, £16 to ^17. 

Strong west and north, west winds prevailed in the beginning of 
the month and did great damage to fruit trees and bushes in many 
gardens. 

A petition asking that permission be granted to the keepers of 
licensed refreshment rooms to open on Sundays from 5 p.m. to 
9 p.m. was presented to the Town Council at the monthly meeting 
and the request was refused. 

The "Taranty" Market was held on 12th — shorn of its former 
glories. There were no fat cattle on the muir and only a very 
moderate show of store cattle and horses. Trade was stiff. 

In delightful weather, the City Brass Band gave a fine recital of 
sacred music in the Public Park, in presence of a large turnout of 
citizens, on the afternoon of Sunday 15th. 

A notable function this month was a charming and successful Fancy 
Fair within the grounds of Brechin Castle, under the auspices of the 
Children's League of Pit}', in which the Earl and Countess of Dal- 
housie take a great interest. The weather, on the whole, was fine, and 
the attendance was large the drawings amounting to £"140. 

At the monthly meeting of the Parish Council it was reported, 
that, as compared with last year, the maintenance cost of the Out- 
door Poor showed a decrease of £y\, while the cost of the Almshouse 
Poor had fallen from ,£555 4s 5d to £"510 2s yd. 

The " Scaffie's Jaunt " came off with great success on Wednesday 
1 8th June. The weather was grand, and everyone was in great glee. 
The route was by Laurencekirk to Bervie where a pleasant day 
was spent. 

There were great rejoicings among the tenants on the Careston 
Estate, and in fact throughout the whole parish, on Thursday 19th, 
the occasion being the home-coming of the young Laird, Mr. W. 
Campbell Adamson, and his bride. 

A pretty Sale of Work organised by the Church of Scotland 
Women's Auxiliary, in aid of Missions, was held at Careston Manse, 
on 2 1st, and ,£33 was realised. 

On 25th, under the direction of the Brechin and District 
Mercantile Association, a big one-day excursion took place to Crieff, 
to which a special train was chartered. An enjoyable outing was had. 

On 25th the Paper Mill and Inch Bleachfield, for the third time, 
were exposed for let by public roup, at the reduced upset rental of ,£450 
per annum, for both subjects, but there were still no offers. 

A big excursion by special train to Inverness, under the auspices 
of Caldhame Works and the Paper Mill, took place on 28th. The long- 
journey to and from was made without mishap and the outing- 
was much enjoyed. 



The Brechin Almanac and Directory for 191 4. 



JULY. 

"Willie Mills Burn," or Hoodston, Menmuir, consisting of 8 acres 
of land, with steading £>-c, was exposed for sale by roup on 1st, at 
the upset price of ,£500, but there were no offers. 

The Dairymen of Brechin district held their annual trip on 3rd, 
when, in glorious weather, they motored to Coupar Angus, thence to 
Dundee and Carnoustie. A very enjoyable day was spent. 

For the quarter, the Victoria Nurses had 81 cases to whom they 
paid 1281 visits. 

Harvest prospects about the middle of the month were moder- 
ately good ; hay splendid — the heaviest and finest quality for years. 

The Strawberry crop this year turned out to be the best for five 
years past. 

Under the auspices of the Women's Freedom League, Miss 
Shennon, Glasgow, and Miss Broughton of Liverpool, gave " Votes 
for Women " Addresses at the Market Cross on 8th. There was a 
large, attentive, orderly crowd and no " incidents." 

The Brechin branch of the I.L. P. held a very enjoyable Garden 
Party in the Public Park on 12th. An Address was delivered by Mr. 
James Maxton, M.A., Glasgow, and an open-air dance followed. 

Brechin Gas Company, Ltd., had a very successful year. The 
Profit and Loss Account after allowing for depreciation &c, showed 
a credit balance of ,£1794 5 s 3^- 

The Town Council raised the Sewage Farm Manager's wages by 
1/6 per week. 

After three times exposing by roup the let of the Town's subjects 
at the Inch, and receiving no offers, the Town Council resolved that 
offers be invited. 

The cost of repairing the damage caused by the recent flood, to the 
coping and railing of the wall in River Street, was estimated at from 
^,25 to .£30. About ,£10 was computed to cover the cost of repairing 
the ground at the Inch. 

There was a large attendance of Flock Masters and Wool 
Merchants at Brechin Annual Wool Fair on 15th. Supplies were 
large and of good quality. Blackfacedsold atS^d per lb., which was 
jd less than at Inverness the week before. 

Brechin City Band gave sundry open air concerts in various parts 
of the Town during the Glasgow Fair Holiday Week, for the benefit 
of Brechin bairns from Glasgow. 

H.M. Inspector of Schools reported, re the lower department of 
the High School, that everything was in a very satisfactory state. 

Mr. W. McDonald, who, for 35 years had been Head Gardener 
at Brechin Castle, left for New Zealand on 17th, and, prior to his 
departure was entertained and made the recipient of a very sub- 
stantial keep-sake subscribed for by the servants on the Brechin j 
Castle, Glenesk and Edzell Estates, 

Sundry Hay Sales took place on Farms in the district at the close 
of the month. The quality of the Hay was excellent and fetched from 
6|d to 9jd per stone of 22 lbs. 



Epitome of Local Events. 



AUGUST. 

The Public Works closed down on 25th July for the midsummer 
holidays ; work was resumed on 4th August. The weather, on the 
whole, was delightful for holiday making. 

Bee-keepers had a splendid clover honey season The honey was 
of superior quality, flavour and colour, and the yield was fair. 

Partridge shooting prospects in the district were exceptionally 
bright. 

At the monthly meeting of Infirmary Directors it was agreed to 
make extensions to the building, including a new operating theatre, 
at a cost of between ,£500 and ^600, which, with internal equip- 
ment, would bring the total outlay up to about ^1000. 

Brechin Horticultural Society held a very successful exhibition in 
Damacre Road Public School on 8th and 9th. Everything was in 
fine bloom and condition— flowers, fruit, and vegetables. 

The Government Grant for the Continuation School for the past 
year was ^180. 

There was splendid weather for the "' Twelfth," and, although 
birds were not as plentiful as for a year or two back, fair bags were 
got in Brechin district. 

All the Board Schools in the City were re-opened on 
12th, after the summer vacation. The High School was re-opened 
on 26th. 

A Sale of Work, held in Edzell U.F. Manse Garden on 14th, for 
the purpose of defraying cost of improvements on the Organ, and 
repairs to the Church, realised ,£75. 

There were great rejoicings on the estate of Balhall on 14th, when 
Miss Katherine Selina Scott, daughter of the Laird, was wed to Mr. 
Arthur Clive Nicholson, son of Colonel E. Nicholson, of Newark-on- 
Trent. 

A Sale of Work at Tarfside on 20th and 21st, to defray cost of 
introducing heating apparatus in the United Free Church there, 
realised £125 12s. 

Black Game shooting opened on 20th in very fine weather and 
good bags were got. 

Harvesting operations were commenced on a numher of farms in 
the district by about the 25th. 

The Summer throughout had^been extremely dry ; the country 
was beginning to look parched for want of rain, and a water famine 
in the City was feared. The spell, however, was broken on 24th, 
when a thunder storm passed over the town, and a perfect deluge of 
rain fell. Rain also fell during the greater part of 25th, and every- 
one was relieved. 

Salmon net fishing on the North and South Esks closed on 30th. 
The season had been only a moderate one and prices on the market 
had ruled rather below the average. 

After some days of oppressively sultry weather, a severe thundetr 
storm passed over the City on 30th, with a torrential downpour of 
rain. 



10 



The Brechin Almanac and Directory for 191 4. 



SEPTEMBER. 

Partridge shooting opened on ist in dull, but, on the whole, 
favourable weather. The season's prospects were better than for 
some years past. 

Notwithstanding the copious falls of rain in the month of August, 
the water in the Trinity Reservoir continued to fall to such 
an alarming extent that the town's authorities issued a warning to 
householders to be careful against waste. 

The grant to the burgh for the year, under the Local Taxation 
Act, was ,£305 14s 2d., and the Town Council agreed to apply it to the 
relief of the burgh rates. 

On 4th. 5th, and 6th, a Bazaar, under the auspices of Lodge St. 
James No 123, was held in the City Hall, for the purpose of raising 
funds towards paying- the cost of recent extensions and alterations on 
the Lodge Hall : the sum of ,£490 was realised. 

Mr. George R. Smith, who, for the past.six years, had been Pro- 
fessional to the Brechin C.C., was on 5th, presented by the club with 
a handsome Gold Watch, and also with a present for Mrs. Smith, on 
the occasion of his leaving the club's service. 

Brechin C.C. concluded their season on 6th, when they played 
Forfarshire ; the " Shire" beat the City 204— 161. 

The City Improvement Association decided on a very worthy work 
when the} - resolved to renovate the grave and repair and restore the 
tombstone of Alexander Laing, the Brechin Poet, author of " Wayside 
Flowers" " Sandy Laing " was born on 17th May 1787 and died 
14th October 1857, and his grave is in the Old Churchyard 
of Brechin. 

In the course of alterations on a house at the corner of Market 
Street and Maisondieu Lane, an old stone mantle-piece was discovered. 
It was found to bear the emblems of the old Hammermen's 
Incorporation and Society, and certain carvings of guns and pistols, 
with the name James McKenzie. James McKenzie carried on agun- 
maker's business there some 100 or 120 years ago. The stone 
was replaced in the outer wall of the house, and there it is now. 

On the occasion of attaining the 50th year of his ministry, the 
whole period having been passed with the Bank Street U.F. (U.P.) 
Congregation, the Rev. R. Workman Orr was, at a public Soiree 
under the auspices of the Congregation, on 22nd, presented with a 
cheque for ^1000 and several other gifts. Mr. Orr was ordained 
to the pastorate on 22nd December 1863. 

The Evening Continuation Classes, under the Burgh School 
Board, were re-opened on 22nd, 

A handsome new Pipe Organ has been introduced into the Gardner 
Memorial Church, and the inauguration thereof took place on 26th, 
when Mr. M. M. Gilchrist, A.R.C.M., Organist of Brechin Cathedral, 
presided at the instrument, and the united choirs of the Cathedral and 
Gardner Memorial Church rendered the vocal parts. 

The enrolments at the High School for the opening session 
showed an increase from 214 to 233. 



Epitome of Local Events. 11 



OCTOBER. 

The Autumn Holiday for the Burgh was observed on 6th, whert 
Schools, Offices, Factories, &c. , were all closed. The weather was 
cold and stormy, with bright intervals, and was not very enticing for 
holiday making. 

The Grouse season was, on the whole, considerably under the 
average of the last two years. 

The Brechin Victoria Nurses attended 69 cases during the quarter, 
and made 1129 visits in all. 

Pheasant shooting opened on 1st. The indications were that the 
season would be a good one. 

The Artisan Golf Club held their Annual Supper in the Club 
House on 8th, when a most enjoyable evening was passed under the 
presidency of the captain, Mr. David Thomson. 

Up to the middle of October, on naany farms in the district, stooks 
of grain were still standing" in the fields, and presented a pitiful 
spectacle, being much blackened and sprouted. The finish of 
harvest had been very much delayed by bad weather. 

Plans of a new operating theatre at the Infirmary, and for other 
internal alterations, at a cost of £500, were approved at the monthly 
meeting of Directors of the Institution, 

A much needed work was the re-numbering of the houses through- 
out the town, which was resolved upon by the Town Council at the 
monthly meeting. 

Anniversary Services were held in the E.U. Congregational 
Church on 19th, when the Rev. A. D. Anderson, Glasgow, preached 
to large congregations, afternoon and evening. The annual Soiree 
was held in the Church on 20th. 

Special Harvest Thanksgiving Services were held in St. Andrew's 
Episcopal Church on Sunday 19th. The Church was beautifully 
and appropriately decorated and the offerings were on behalf of the 
Church's Foreign Mission in Kafraria and Canada. 

By the last week of the month, potato lifting was well on to a finish. 
The weather had been fine and the work, on the whole, was rapidly 
got on with. The quality was good, but the crop was scarcely up to 
the average of recent years. 

Mr. William Brand, after completing 52 years in the service of the 
Caledonian Railway, most of the time at Brechin Station, as foreman 
plate-layer, was, on 25th, presented by the station staff and friends 
with an Easy Chair and Purse of Sovereigns and a Silver Teapot 
for " the wife." 

By a fire at the farm of Dalgety on the early morning of 25th, ten 
stacks of oats were consumed, the loss amounting to between ^300 
and ^400. 

The Rev. Dr. Carter gave a very interesting illustrated lecture in 
the East Parish Church on 26th, on gospel work among the women 
of India. 

The Co-operative Society raised the Bakers' wages 3/- per week, 
making the minimum wage 30/- per week. 



12 



The Brechin Almanac and Directory for 191 4.. 



NOVEMBER. 

The Brechin Cage Bird Society celebrated their Jubilee this month, 
when an exceptionally fine exhibition was held in the Temperance 
Hall on 1st. There were exhibits from all over the kingdom. 

The angling season on North and South Esks closed on 1st Nov. 
and was reckoned probably the worst season on record. 
"Takes " were very small throughout. 

Pollingfor the election of the Town Council and for the triennial 
election of the Parish Council, took place on 4th. For four seats 
on the Town Council there were six candidates — the four retiring 
members, a former member, who was defeated at last election, and 
one new man. Three of the retiring members were sent back, 
along with the candidate formerly rejected. 

For the 12 seats on the Parish Council— burghal ward — there were 
14 candidates, some old and some new, and all the old members who 
stood were returned, with one exception, 

Brechin Co-operative Women's Guild held a very successful 
Cinderella Dance in the Temperance Hall on 7th, when a pleasant 
time was passed. 

At the first meeting of the newly constituted Town Council, the 
Reverend member of the Board was appointed to the vacant bailie- 
ship. Brechin's Reverend Bailie is almost the only Reverend Bailie 
in the kingdom. , 

The Town Council, at their meeting on 10th, set themselves down 
to give serious consideration to the improvement of the public water 
supply. The " serious consideration " resulted in remitting the 

matter to the water committee. 

On the occasion of relinquishing her position as matron of the 
Brechin Day Nursery, to take up work in Edinburgh, Miss King was, 
on 10th, waited upon by the mothers patronising the Institution, and 
was presented with a handsome fitted bag, as a token of their 
appreciation of her services. 

103 fully paid up £1 shares in the Farmers' Mart were put up for 
sale by roup in various lots, on nth, and sold at £1 each. 

The Town Council decided to purchase new enamelled name- 
plates for the Streets, and to have the numbers of the Doors 
repainted — a much needed improvement. 

Hallowe'en was celebrated in Brechin on the 12th, in the usual 
rollicking manner. 

The Burgh School Board at their meeting on 17th, raised the 
maximum scale of pay for female teachers from £&o to £qo per 
annum, and that of the male teachers from ^130 to £135- 

The Brechin Association of the Educational Institute of Scotland 
held a delightful " At Home " in the Mechanics' Hall on 15th, to bid 
welcome to Mr. C. H. Rankine and Mr. A. McDonald, H.M.I.S., 
appointed as Inspectors in the north Forfarshire and Kincardineshire 
Division. 



Obituary Notices. 13 



Obituary Notices. 



MR. JAMES PARTY, WEST TOLL. 

" James " was a roadman for the greater part of his life, having 
followed that occupation in the Brechin district for fully sixty years. 

Some forty five years prior to his death he rented the West Toll 
of Brechin, which he held until Tolls were abolished. Thereafter he 
continued to reside in the old Toll HouSe. 

Some years before his death, Mr. Barty retired from work on 
account of advancing" years and physical frailties. He was of a 
retiring disposition, but a wide circle of friends held him in high 
regard. Mr. Barty had been in somewhat feeble health for some 
time and he passed away on 16th December, 1912, in his 89th year. 

REV. J Y. SCOTT. 

Although removed from Brechin more than a generation ago, the 
Rev. J. Y. Scott, as a former minister of the East Parish Church, 
which was his first charge, is still held in kindly remembrance by the 
older members of that congregation. 

During the period of his ministry in Brechin he gained the esteem, 
not only of his congregation, but of all classes in the community. 
A man of the most happy disposition and open mind, he was an 
especial favourite with the young people, with whom he kept himself 
in close touch. After some years of pastoral work in Brechin he was 
translated to a charge in Kirkcaldy where his labours were equally 
effective, Thence he went to Buccleuch Parish, Edinburgh, and 
finally to the charge of Campsie Parish. There he laboured for a 
score of years, latterly, on account of failing health, applying for and 
receiving an assistant and successor. Mr. Scott died very suddenly 
at Portobello in the month of February, io his 69th year. 

MR. WILLIAM D. FERRIER, MERCHANT. 

Mr. William D. Ferrier was born of humble parentage in St. Mary 
Street, Brechin, and after a short period of " schulin " was put to 
work as a message boy with the well-known firm of Mitchell & 
Shepherd, Grocers, Brechin, who, at that time, occupied the corner 
premises at the 'Prentice Neuk now inpossession of the Brechin United 
Co-operative Society, Ltd. In due time "Willie" became a full- 
fledged grocer's apprentice, and at the expiry of his four years' 
apprenticeship he went to Edinburgh to gain further business 
experience. 

After a short stay in the Capital City he returned to Brechin as 
head salesman in the firm where he received his early training and 
with them he remained. 



14 



The Brechin Almanac and Directory for 1914' 



Mr. Shepherd, the junior partner, died some time after Mr. 
Ferrier's return and the latter became the active right-hand man of 
the senior partner — the late Lord Provost Mitchell, 

With advancing years Mr. Mitchell retired and Mr. Ferrier became 
a partner in the business along with Mr. Mitchell's son, who shortly 
afterwards left the city, Mr. Ferrier then becoming sole proprietor 
and continuing to carry on a most progressive and successful business 
until his death 

Mr. Ferrier was of a retiring but very genial nature. He took no 
office on public boards, but was always keenly interested in what 
was going on, whether in Church, Municipal, or Scholastic affairs. 
He had a mind of his own ; was never slow to express his views 
whether for or against those held by the general community and his 
shrewd and solid outlook on matters of general interest were much 
appreciated. 

He took a warm and practical interest in Bank Street U.F. Church 
and did much for the welfare of that congregation in which for a long 
period he was an office-bearer. He gave a ready support to all 
philanthrophic and charitable schemes. 

Mr. Ferrier lived a simple life and his recreations were few. He 
keenly enjoyed a game at bowls or a round of the golf course. He 
was the same unassuming gentleman to all classes and was held in 
the highest esteem by all. He was at business in- his usual health 
up to the forenoon of Monday, 24th March, when he was seized with 
a sudden illness and removed to his home. In spite of all that 
medical aid could do, he rapidly became worse, and died early on the 
morning of 25th March. Mr. Ferrier was 63 years of age and 
unmarried. 

MR. ROBERT W. WILL, S.S.C. 

Mr. Will was the second son of the late Mr. Charles Will, Writer, 
Brechin, who was for some time Provost of the City, and founder of 
the law firm now known as Messrs. Will & Philip. 

He received his early education under Mr. Prain of the Burgh 
School, and Mr. Alexander, then Rector of the Grammar School, and 
afterwards served his law apprenticeship in his father's office. 

Before he was out of his teens he went to Edinburgh and entered 
the office of Mr. James Webster, S.S.C, who had one of the largest 
practices in that City. Mr. Will, by his close attention to business, 
secured rapid promotion, and became Managing Clerk within two 
years of entering the office. In 1869 he became a member of the 
Society of Solicitors .0 the Supreme Court and prior to that he had 
charge of the Court business of the firm of which, in 1871, he was 
assumed a partner. Later, he became the senior partner, the firm 
being then known as Messrs. Webster, Will, & Ritchie, and enjoying 
a law business which was one of the most extensive in Edinburgh. 

A thoroughly keen man of business, Mr. Will devoted little time 
(o matters outside his own profession. Although resident outwith 
Brechin since his early youth, he ever showed a deep and kindly 
interest in his native city, and that interest took a very practical and 



Obituary Notices. 15 



generous form when, on the occasion of the restoration of Brechin 
Cathedral, he gifted to the memory of his father, the thirteen beautiful 
stained glass windows in the Chancel. 

Kindly and humorous, Mr. Will had many friends and held the 
esteem of all with whom he came in contact. He had been retired 
from business for some years on account of ill health, and he died 
rather suddenly at his residence in Colinton Road, Edinburgh, on 
Tuesdny, 3rd June, in his 69th year. Mr. Will was unmarried. 

MR. WILLIAM DUNCAN, WEST PITTENDREICH. 

Mr. Duncan was brought up on the farm of West Pittendreich of 
which his father had been tenant for a number of years. He was 
educated at the Brechin Burgh School and afterwards received a 
business training in a law office in town. Thereafter he assisted 
his father on the farm, and, on the death of the latter, entered on a 
tenancy of it on his own account, continuing to hold it until his death. 
Mr. Duncan never took any part in public affairs, but his kindly, 
happy, nature made for him a multitude of friends. He was an 
enthusiastic musician and as a violinist was gifted with no small 
ability. He had been in somewhat poor health for a considerable 
time and he died on the morning of Sunday, 5th October. Mr. 
Duncan left a Widow. 

MR. ALEX. ROBERTSON, FARNELL MILLS. 

Mr. Robertson had been connected with the business of Farnell 
Meal Mills for over fifty years, having succeeded the tenancy of his 
father. He spent his whole life in the parish of Farnell, and was 
a well-known and highly respected figure, not only in that parish, 
but throughout a wide district. 

A man of sound principles and business integrity he gained the 
esteem of all, in the many centres where his business led him. 

Mr. Robertson took no active part in the public affairs of the 
parish, but he had a very kindly and practical interest in those less 
fortunate than himself and was ever ready with a helping hand. 

He had not been in the best of health for a year or two and his 
death occurred on 14th November in his 75th year. Mr. Robertson 
left a widow and two daughters. 



16 



The Brechin Almanac and Directory for 191 4. 



SMf-Ccrttittt) (DbittntrB at Prominent 
^otonismen atto Jte.ighb0u.r0. 



Chas. Ogilvy, solicitor . 1864 

VV. Pennycook, Bridgend 1864 

Jas. Anderson, Bridgend 1864 

John Dakers, shoemaker. 1864 

Dr. Jas. Don, of Bearehill 1864 

Rev. T. Hill, Logie Pert 1864 

Jas. Hampton, T. Market 1865 
John Grimm, manufacturer 1865 

Jas. Knowles, Crown Inn 1865 

D. Laing, manufacturer . 1865 

Robt. Scott, Pittendreich 1866 

Wm. Anderson, solicitor 1866 

Rev. H. Brewster, Farnell 1866 
Dr. Alex. Gibson, Auchen- 

reoch - - - - 1867 

Rev. D. Harris, Fern - 1867 

Hunt. Mather, Association 1868 

John Patullo, Burghill - 1868 

Geo. Reid, tobacconist - 1868 
G. Cooper Scott, of Glen- 

cadam - - - 1868 

Dr. William Sharpe, - 1868 
John Inglis Chalmers, of 

Aldbar - - - 1868 

John Valentine, carpenter 1868 

R. Vallentine, Bogmuir - 1868 
Rev. Geo. Walker, D.D., 

Kinnell - - - 1868 

Wm. Fraser, town-officer 1868 

Wm. Mill, cabinetmaker 1869 

Alex. Monro, East Mills- 1869 

A- Pirie, nurseryman - 1869 

Dr. Alex. Guthrie . - 1869 
A Sieve wright, Association 1870 7 

Alex. Black, bookseller - 1870 

Alex. Burns, fisherman - 1870 

Jas. Fairweather, distiller 1870 
Rev. A. Simpson, M.A., 

Tarfside - - - 1871 

Charles Mitchell, draper 1871 



66 

83 
87 
93 
65 
65 
67 
61 
50 
60 
70 
84 
60 

67 
93 
68 
73 

81 

46 
71 

59 

75 
82 

85 
97 
64 
80 
64 
77 
5 
77 
65 
83 



86 



J. Carnegy Arbuthnott, of 

Balnamoon . 
David Craig, solicitor 
Patrick Guthrie, draper . 
George Jarron, Mains of 

Melgund 
Or. Robert Jarron . 
Thomas Kerr, Viewbank 
lames Thomson, Findowrie 
John Mather, postrunner 
J. Smith, Masons' Lodge 
James Speid, of Forneth 
David Black, Barrelwell - 
Geo. Anderson, auctioneer 
J. Anderson, cabinetmaker 
Rev. Thomas Guthrie, D.D. 
J. Alexander, bookbinder 
Right Hon. Earl of Dal- 

housie (Fox Maule) 
James Don, candlemaker 
Rev. James Gowans 
Rev. A. Halkett - 
David Lamb, manufacturer 
Rt. Rev. Bishop Forbes, 

D.C.L, 
D. Robertson, Mains of 

Edzell . 
George Scott, banker 
Colvin Smith, R.S.A. - 
D. I). Black, town-clerk - 
Joseph Hendry, draper - 
Rev. John Lamb, Errol 
Alex. Lawrence, Greenden 
John Lawrence, S. Port - 
Geo. Scott, of Renmuir - 
J. Jameson, ironmonger - 
Rev. R. Inglis, Edzell - 
Sir Jas. Campbell of Stra- 

cathro . - - - 
J. Lindsay, T. Market - 



Died Age 

1871 88 

1871 63 

1871 65 

1871 70 

1871 65 

1871 55 

1871 78 

1872 87 
1872 79 
1872 92 

1872 62 

1873 59 
1873 72 

1873 69 

1874 64 

1874 73 

1874 72 

1874 82 

1874 63 

1S74 77 

1875 59 

1875 63 

1875 69 

1875 SO 

1875 78 

1875 77 

1875 87 

1875 87 

1875 61 

1876 89 
1876 84 
1876 72 

1876 86 

1876 83 



Half-Century Obituary. 



17 



Dan. Macintosh, registrar 

C. Oswald, tobacco manufr. 
James Ogilvy, Pitforthie 
James Peter, Tillygloom 
Rev. G. Alexander, rector 
1 )avid Duke, manufacturer 
G. Duncan, W. Pi'ndreich 
Dr. J. Fettes, Laurencekirk 
Sam. Strachan, High St. 
James Dall, nurseryman 
A. Jervise, F.G.A. Insp. 

of Registers 
Rev. A. L. R. Foote, D.D. 
Thomas Don, Balzeordie 
Jas. Vallentine, Arnhall - 
John Watson, Ledmore - 
Charles Will, solicitor 
George Gray, bleacher 
John Smart, Jun., . 
T. Ogilvy, corn merchant 
James Guthrie, Edzell 
David Hebenton, S. Port 
G. Henderson, D. Nursery 
Alex. Joe, mason - 

D. S. Shiress, Edinburgh 
James Barclay, Gas Co. - 
W. Christie, upholsterer ■ 
Right Hon. Earl of Dal- 

housie (Geo. Ramsay) . 
Wm. Lowe, postmaster - 
Lieut. -Col. Swinburne, of 

Marcus 
John Valentine, draper - 
Jas. Watt, Provost of Leith 
Wm. Shiress, solicitor - 
Dr. Douglas, of St. Anns 
Alex. Guthrie, Maisondieu 
Alex. Laing, LL.D. 
Robert Symington - 
Robt. Stocks, Westside - 
Cap. Hon. J. Carnegie, R.N, 
Col. David Guthrie . 
Rev. Alex. M. Davidson, 

Kinnell 
John G. Scott, Cross 
Joseph Simpson, cowfeeder 
John Davidson, saddler . 
J. Ed-vard, Ms. Keithock 
Major - General Ramsay 

(Edward Bannerman) . 
F. M. Lord Strathnairn, 

K.C.B. (Hugh H. Rose) 
James Fletcher, of Fern 



Oied 


Age 


1876 


78 


1876 


85 


1877 


88 


1S77 


82 


1S77 


92 


1877 


55 


1877 


77 


1877 


79 


187S 


74 


1878 


93 


1878 


58 


1878 


74 


1878 


74 


1878 


65 


1878 


84 


1S78 


68 


1878 


55 


1879 


24 


1879 


82 


1879 


53 


1879 


77 


1879 


77 


1879 


47 


1880 


55 


1880 


75 


1880 


39 


1880 


75 


1880 


76 


1881 


77 


1881 


65 


1881 


51 


1881 


77 


1881 


74 


1882 


83 


1882 


74 


1882 


71 


1883 


75 


1883 


54 


1883 


69 


1883 


47 


1884 


52 


1884 


74 


1884 


79 


1884 


83 


1884 


58 


1885 


82 


1885 


75 



Died Age 



D. Crighton, Maisondieu 

Lane - 1885 

R. Gordon, Gold's Yards 1885 
Alexander Mustard - 1886 

Horatio Ross, Netherley 1886 
John Smith, Andover, Mass. 1886 
Rev. Archibald Buchanan, 

Logie-Pert . 
Dr. Alex. Guthrie - 
Alex. Fairweather, Pearse 

Street - 
Alex. R. Laing 
Rev. Andw. M '111 wraith, 

Lochlee 
James Webster, Farnell - 

C. Young, nurseryman - 

D, Young, St. Mary st. - 
Alex. Airth, blacksmith - 
William Craig, Drum 
G. Cromar, missionary - 
John Dakers, manufacturer 1887 
Right Hon. Earl of Dal 

housie (John Ramsay)- 
John Dear, mason - 
Ross Dear, painter . 
James Alex. Gardner 
John Guthrie, M.D. 
James P. Jack, Penrith - 



1886 
18S6 

1886 
1886 

1886 
1886 
1886 
1887 
1887 
1887 
1887 



1887 
1887 
1887 
1887 
1887 
1887 
Rev. Walter Low, Lochlee 1887 
D. M'Gregor Peter- - 1887 
John M'Pherson Scott - 1887 
John Morton, joiner - 1888 
Hugh Baird, Menmuir - 1888 
Joseph Brand, merchant 1888 
Robert Anderson - - 1888 
James Scotland - - 1888 
William Angus, - - 1888 
l 'avid Rose, farmer - 1888 

John Rose, farmer - - 1888 
Richard Alexander - - 1888 
Alexander Buchan, joiner 1888 
John P. Rose, California 1888 
John Crowe - - - 1888 
William Watt, joiner • 1888 
David Inglis, Montrose - 1888 
G. Davidson, N.W. Bridge 1888 
C. Lyall, Old Montrose - 1888 
D.S.Robertson, Murlin'den 1888 
John Sutherland, Lochlee 1888 
James Pert, local character 1888 
James Hood, weaver - 1888 
David Goi'don, farmer, 1888 
Duncan Duff, shoemaker 1889 



83 
95 

58 
86 
98 



56 

77 
59 



73 
83 
68 
86 
70 
93 

40 
84 
69 
30 
57 
66 
84 
84 
36 
63 
84 
73 
75 
53 
70 
82 
78 
67 
76 
37 
54 
73 
57 
79 
75 
86 
65 
76 
80 
88 
53 



18 The Brechin Almanac and Directory for 1914- 




Died 


Ag» 




Died Age 


George D. Leighton, farmer IS89 


70 


Jas. Henderson, Kincraig 


1892 — 


John Michie, gamekeeper 


1889 


45 


James Lesslie, slater 


1892 62 


Alexander Selby, tailor 


1889 


52 


Wm. Duncan, merchant - 


1892 87 


David Christie, watchmaker 1889 


46 


Wm. Smith, farmer 


1892 73 


John Lindsay, joiner 


18S9 


59 


Dr. Burns, Kirkleston 


1892 84 


David Bean, auctioneer - 


18S9 


73 


R. Meldrum - 


1893 61 


James Duncan, shoemaker 


1889 


54 


John Adamson, Careston 


1893 80 


George Milne, farmer 


1889 


75 


Wm. Low (Lairdie) 


1893 72 


James Will, solicitor 


1889 


42 


Jas. Melrose - 


1893 78 


John Mackie, surgeon 


18S9 


80 


John Gibson - 


1893 59 


Major General J. Smith ■ 


1889 


65 


Rev. Alex. Gardner 


1893 SO 


John Hood, contractor - 


1889 


67 


Rev. Jas. Edward Carlyle, 




Dean Moir 


1889 


— 


London 


1893 71 


David Scott, Newington - 


1890 


78 


J. L. Gordon - 


1893 71 


Wm, Laing, meter insp. - 


1890 


77 


Jas. Edwards - 


1893 66 


John Belford, Chicago 


1890 


66 


James Scott - 


1893 81 


Homer Neish, postman - 


1890 


— 


Wm. Carnegie of Durilappie 


1893 91 


Wm. Neish, ,, 


1890 


30 


William Sinclair, slater . 


1893 49 


A. Paxton, J. P., Viewbank 1890 


61 


Alexander Gordon, painter 


1893 56 


J. Mitchell, Stannochy - 


1890 


55 


Wm. Davidson, Calcutta 


1894 52 


D. Fairweather, Langhaugh 1890 


72 


Thos. Picken, teacher 


1894 69 


Rev. D. Davidson - 


1890 


89 


Robt. Thomson, plasterer 


1894 86 


John Adamson, Negapatam 1890 


39 


Chas. Oswald Hall - 


1894 40 


G. F. Fenwick, revenue 






Charles Mitchell - 


1894 68 


officer - - - - 


1890 


75 


James Ford, draper 


1894 66 


John Towns, America 


1890 


76 


W. H. Duncan, tinsmith 


1894 86 


Wm. .Steven, slater 


1890 


76 


J. Buyers of Easter Braikie 1894 79 


Wm. Lyall, teacher 


1890 


30 


Chas. Alexander, solicitor 


1894 41 


Archibald Duke 


1890 


20 


Wm. Allison, land stewarc 


1894 72 


D. P. Mitchell, Architect 


1890 


27 


David Glen, clothier 


1894 64 


J. Martin, N. Melgund - 


1890 


76 


Wm. Mitchell, shoemaker 


1895 73 


John Low, cowfeeder 


1891 


89 


Colin Sievwright 


1895 76 


James Gordon, tailor 


1891 


78 


John Mackie, M.D. 


1895 53 


James Ireland 


1891 


66 


Jas, Thomson, plasterer . 


1895 52 


Robert B. Thomson 


1891 


41 


B. M. Bisset, M.R.C.V.S. 


1895 50 


James Bruce, mason 


1891 


66 


John Mollison 


1895 82 


Charles Martin, farmer - 


1891 


77 


J. C. Inveraritv 


1895 40 


Dean Crabb 


1891 


61 


Rev. H. Aird, D.D. 


1895 70 


J. Stephen, flax inspector 


1891 


46 


Jas. Baxter, builder 


1895 41 


John Jarron, clothier 


1891 


57 


Thos. Nicol, merchant . 


1895 90 


Wm. Davidson 


1891 


— 


Thomas Annand 


1895 86 


J. Spalding, factory-worker 1891 


84 


Jonathan Davidson 


1895 32 


James Myles, forester 


1891 


49 


G. Cubhbert, plumber - 


1895 44 


H. D. Praia, Scottish Union 






David Wishart, spirit mer 


1896 42 


and Nat. Insurance Co. 


1*91 


_ 


Geo. Wallace - 


1S96 70 


William Bruce, painter - 


1891 


45 


G. O'Neil 


1896 70 


T. H. Cox, of Maulesden 


1892 


74 


Col. Melnroy, the Burn - 


1896 91 


Rev. Donaldson Rose 


1892 


74 


Geo. Fenwick, Hong-Kcny 


1896 — 


Jas. Inverarity, bookseller 


1892 


SO 


Jas. D. Winton, solicitor 


1896 67 


Wm. Black, joiner - 


1892 


81 


John Willocks, watchmaker 1896 76 


Dr. Thomson - 


1892 


44 


Alex. Adams, Newton Mill 1896 - 


John Peacock, joiner 


1892 


92 


Jas. A. Kinnear, plumber 


1896 69 


Jas. Mustard, corn mcht. 


1892 


— 


Wm. Hebenton, flesher - 


1896 68 



Half-Century Obituary. 


19 




Died 


Age 




Died Age 


Jas. Scott, Pittendreich - 


1896 


62 


D. M. Ford, draper 


1900 71 


Alex. Miller, Melbourne - 


1896 


45 


John Henry, S.S.C. 


1900 83 


Ilobt. Smith, farmer, Perth 1896 


80 


John S. Bisset 


1900 52 


William Whitson, solicitor 


1898 


69 


John Denholm, Kinnaird 


1900 *57 


A. Stevenson Cookston 


1896 


— 


John S. Smith 


1 900 56 


P. Mitchell, Bridge street 


1896 


69 


Wm. Anderson 


1900 76 


P. Mitchell, confectioner 


1S96 


45 


Mrs Mitchell . 


1900 102 


D. Prain, teacher - 


1897 


92 


" Miss Jessie " Alexander 


1900 82 


Colonel Scott, farmer 


1897 


51 


Rev. J. A. Clark - 


1900 41 


John Duncan, millwright 


1897 


61 


Hon. D. Carnegie - 


1900 30 


George Mitchell, ground 






Robt. Lamb . 


1900 72 


officer, Edzell 


1897 


74 


Jas. Thomson . 


1901 71 


Joseph Reid, joiner 


1897 


78 


Walter Bruce . 


1901 70 


D. F. Anderson, J. P. 


1S97 


61 


Colonel Guthrie 


1901 73 


John Clark, crofter 


1897 


67 


Thos. Ferguson 


1901 S6 


D. Low, waste merchant 


1897 


65 


Robt. Black . 


1901 58 


J. B. Hodge, clothier 


1897 


40 


James Smith, farmer 


1901 64 


A. Morrison, saddler 


1897 


61 


H. Edwards, hallkeeper - 


1901 73 


Lieut. -Col. The Honble. 






J. Smart, manufacturer - 


1901 85 


Robt. A. Ramsay 


1S97 


— 


Alex. Fraser . 


1902 77 


D. Steele. Star hotel 


1897 


53 


Wm. Bruce, joiner - 


1902 75 


W. M. Mustard - 


1897 


78 


Rev. George Monro, M.A. 


1902 80 


Charles Low - 


1898 


80 


James Milne Grubb 


1902 63 


Robert G. Mcwat 


1898 


84 


John Oswald . 


1902 75 


J. S. Grant, dentist 


1898 


73 


Alex. Cowtts, F.E.I.S. - 


1902 67 


William Thorn 


1898 


60 


James M. Bain 


1902 48 


James Beam - 


1S98 


81 


D. B. Mackie . 


1902 41 


R. L. Mustard 


1898 


74 


Rev. J. L. Thomson, 




James Reid ... 


1898 


— 


M.A., B.D. 


1902 55 


David Cargill - 


1898 


80 


Alex. Carnegie, D.L., J. P. 


1902 58 


Alex. Reid, farmer ■ 


1899 


55 


D. F. Scott - 


1902 38 


Walter Ogilvy, farmer 


1899 


90 


W. Carnegie, Coul . 


1902 70 


Alex. Mitchell, D.D. 


1899 


76 


Alex. Murray, Montreal 


1902 65 


Wm. Reid, station master 


1899 


76 


Jas. Brodie 


1902 48 


A. Simpson, coachbuilder 


1S99 


76 


John Innes, farmer 


1903 84 


Rev. James Mackay 


1899 


— 


Jas. Stevenson, Town 




Arthur Capel Carnegy 






Chamberlain 


1903 57 


Arbuthnott - 


1899 


76 


W. M. Vallentine, banker 


1903 56 


David Joe ... 


1899 


63 


Alex. Durie, accountant - 


1903 28 


Alex. Bell, farmer - 


1899 


45 


John Buchanan, teacher 


1903 38 


Wm. Don, merchant 


1899 


— 


Rev. J. D. Don, S. Africa 


1903 69 


A. K. Strachan, tailor - 


1899 


63 


John Bruce, painter 


1903 56 


John Don, bank agent - 


1S99 


— 


Ramsay Kidd 


1903 76 


Geo. Anderson, auctioneer 


1S99 


56 


Robt. Mather, solicitor - 


1903 83 


Alex. Crockett, builder - 


1899 


62 


James Kidd 


1903 77 


D. G. C. Scott, farmer - 


1899 


62 


Miss Duke, Esk Park 


1903 79 


VV. O'Neill - 


1900 


76 


John Cargill, gardener - 


1903 — 


Jonathan Cooper, gamedlr 


1900 


84 


Alexander M. Thomson, 




Jas. Black, Auchlishie - 


1900 


73 


accountant . 


1904 83 


D. Edwards, shoemaker - 


1900 


— 


James Clark, painter 


1904 73 


Al. Thomson, S.S.C. 


1900 


60 


Dowager-Countess of Dal- 




D. Yule - 


1900 


91 


housie .. . - - 


1904 85 


John Baxter, builder 


1900 


70 


Hon. Mrs. C. M. Ramsay 


1904 — 



20 The Brechin Almanac and Directory for 1914- 








Died 


Age 




Died 


Age 


James H. Lamb, manu- 






D. Hume, Barrelwell 


1908 


57 


facturer 


1904 


68 


D. Sharpe, East Drum - 


1908 


69 


John Black, solicitor 


1904 


72 


Rev. F. Cruickshanks 


1908 


81 


W. Brechin, musician 


1904 


80 


John Soutar Baxter 


1908 


67 


Martin M. M. Prain 


1904 


68 


Robert Duke, J. P. - 


1908 


80 


David Hutcheon, painter 


1904 


71 


Sir H. Cainpbell-Banner- 






J. J. Taylor, accountant 


1904 


70 


man .... 


1908 


72 


John Coupar, farmer 


1905 


80 


Alex. Law ... 


1908 


90 


The Rt. Hon. The Earl of 






Right Hon. J. A. Campbell 


1908 


84 


Southesk, K.T. . 


1905 


77 


David Milne, farmer 


1908 


68 


Chas. Anderson, solicitor 


1905 


83 


John Y. Burness, manager 


1908 


79 


Rev. D. S. Ross, Edzell . 


1905 


65 


R. W. Duke, manufacturer 


1908 


47 


Ex-Bailie Lawrence 


1905 


69 


Andrew Rodger 


1909 


79 


Ex-Bailie Hampton 


1905 


60 


Jas. Edwards, plumber - 


1909 


44 


James Christie, draper - 


1905 


60 


David Smart, builder 


1909 


84 


Alex. Smith, residenter 


1905 


67 


Wm. Jolly, bookseller - 


1909 


65 


Rev. Colin Vallentine, 






Gregor Cumming 


1909 


58 


F.R.C.S.E., LL.D. - 


1905 


70 


John Lawrence, chemist 


1909 


75 


Wm. Sievwright 


1905 


82 


Jas. M. Strachan, butcher 


1909 


70 


Alex. Scott 


1905 


74 


Keith Knowles, horsehirer 


1909 


57 


John Duke, manufacturer 


1905 


50 


Wm. Dalgetty 


1909 


70 


William Stewart 


1905 


61 


Jas. Craig, solicitor 


1909 


78 


David Alexander, printer 


1905 


56 


Rev. R. Grant, Stracathro 


1909 


81 


Colonel R. G. Lowe 


1906 


69 


Robt. Finlay, rope spinner 


1909 


51 


Mrs. Capel Carnegy Ar- 






James Mitchell, C.E. 


1909 


— 


buthnott 


1906 


83 


Rev. John Traill, India - 


1909 


— 


Capt. Dudley Chas. Stuart 


9 




David Reid, farmer 


1909 


89 


R.N. . 


1906 


62 


Rev. John Duke 


1909 


74 


Mrs Robert Duke - 


1906 


— 


John Shiress Will, K.C, - 


1910 


69 


John Oswald, paper maker 


1906 


84 


John Scott Ferrier, 






W. Watson Watt 


1906 


56 


publisher ... 


1910 


66 


David Don, Durban 


1906 


— 


John Jolly, innkeeper 


1910 


43 


Jas. Johnston, gardener 


1906 


62 


John Willocks, merchant 


1910 


68 


James Smith, West Kirby 


1906 


84 


Walter C. Christie, spirit 






David Burns, publisher 


1906 


95 


merchant 


1910 


51 


J. B. Terrace, gas manager 


1906 


58 


James Grimm, joiner 


1910 


84 


Jas. Wood, hotel keeper 


1906 


61 


D. Hodgeton, chemist 


1910 


85 


John Brown, musician - 


1906 


28 


John Selby, Farnell 


1910 


58 


Rev. D. M. Morgan 


1906 


48 


Alex. Rankine, overseer - 


1910 


68 


Rev. Dr J. S. Black 


1906 


61 


Henry Braid, saddler 


1911 


79 


Charles C. Knowles 


1906 


50 


Wm. Whyte, draper 


1911 


78 


James Ferrier, distiller - 


1907 


90 


Alex. Lawrence, M.D. - 


1911 


68 


James Don, solicitor 


1907 


70 


William Fettes 


1911 


78 


J, Milne, Crimean veteran 


1907 


72 


John Anderson 


1911 


65 


Wm. McNab of Keithock 


1907 


64 


Wm. Matthew, grocer - 


1911 


75 


J. B. Chalmers, West Muir 


1907 


75 


J. B. Meldrum, rag mcht. 


1911 


59 


R. V. Cowan, Balbirnie - 


1907 


66 


G. M. Inglis of Murlingden 


1911 


67 


Alex. Smith, Findowrie 


1907 


24 


Rev. Wm. Duke, D.D., - 


1911 


80 


W. E. Christie, M.A. - 


1907 


64 


Bobert Hampton, merchant 1911 


79 


Wm. Middleton, M.A. - 


1907 


75 


Jas. Anderson, Bridgend 


1911 


— ' 


Augustus John William 






John Willocks, tailor 


1912 


89 


Henry Kennedy-Erskine 






George Gordon Brechin, 






of Dun 


1908 


42 


painter 


1912 


83 



Half-Century Obituary. 



21 



Jas. Laing, potato m'cht. 

John Soutar, Leuchland - 

John Shiell, S.S.C. 

Alexander Annandale, 
nurseryman 

James Todd, reedmaker - 

James Crocket, huilder - 

John Gordon 

W. Innes Addison, Glas- 
gow University registrar 

David Middleton, postman 

Alexander Grant 

Blyth Waterson, bookseller 



Died 


Age 


1912 


74 


1912 


80 


1912 


79 


1912 


80 


1912 


81 


1912 


79 


1912 


53 


1912 


55 


1912 


84 


1912 


58 


1912 


76 



Died 

D. J. M'Kay, bookseller 1912 

James Barty, tollkeeper - 1912 

Wm. Ferrier, shoemaker 1912 

W'm. D. Ferrier, grocer - 1913 
Very Rev. Wm. Hatt, 

Dean of Hrechin - - 1913 
Robt. W. Will, S.S.C. - 1913 
George More, Iron- 
founder - - - 1913 
William Duncan, Fanner 1913 
Robertson, Alex., Farnell 
Mills .... 1913 



Age 

89 
84 
63 

70 
69 

67 
64 

75 




22 



The Brechin Almanac and Directory for 1914- 



^professions aab %xnhtB pirtctarg. 



Note. — The Publishers have made every endeavour to ensure correctness in this List 
Omissions or inaccuracies o>i being pointed oiit will he corrected in next year's issue. 



Aerated Water Manufacturer. 

Lamb, David, 32 City road 

Architects. 

Boulton, A., 31 St. David street 
Galloway, D. W.,2 Market st. 

Auctioneers. 

w 
Barrie, James, Clerk street 
Brechin Auction Mart, Ltd. 

Milne, John, 11 Panmure street 
Gibson, G. O., 11 Panmure street 
Stewart, James C. , 1 1 Panmure st. 
Brechin Farmers' Mart Ltd. 
Mitchell W n., Clerk street 

Sakers. 

Aitken Brothers, Montrose street 
Belford, Alex., 28 High street 
Belford, John, Market street 
Brechin United Co-Operative Society 

(Limited), Montrose street and 

Witchden road 
Cook, J., Montrose street 
Gellatly, J., 45 High street 
Gellatly, J. (pastry), St. David st. 
Hutton, W., 31 High street 
Ritchie, James, 26 Montrose street 

Bicycle Hirers and Dealers. 

A ndarson, Thomas, Montrose street 
Eavidson, John, Panmure street 
Duncan, John, St. David street and 

St. Mary street 
E'^go, Win. B., Montrose street 
G:ay, Wm„ Liver street 
Milne, A., & Son, Clerk street 
Wilson, J., Montrose street 

Billposters. 

Forfarshire Billposting Company 



Blacksmiths. 

Bisset & Douglas, 48 City road 
Oswald, John, & Son, Damacre road 
Oswald, Peter, River street 
Sherret, D., 6 Clerk street 

Bleachers. 

Cargill & Company, Limited 
Inch Bleaching Company 

Booksellers and Stationers. 

BLACK & JOHNSTON, 40 High st. 
Alexander, William, St. David street 
Dutch, David, High street and St. 

Mary street 
Hendry, William, Swan street 
Robertson, D. B., Montrose st. 

Boot and Shoemakers. 

Brechin United Co-Operative Society 

(Limited), High street 
Collie, John, 36 Market street 
Cooper, J., 11 Bridge street 
Davidson, W., South Port 
Duke, John, High street 
Duncan, John, 35 Montrose street 
Findlay, J., High street 
Greenlees & Sons, 17 High street 
Jenkins, Jas., 6 Swan street 
Keith, R., Montrose street 
Kidd, Ramsay, High street 
Mitchell, George, 12 High street 
Robertson, D., Market street 
Ross, John, Montrose street 
Sanderson, J., River street 
Stephen, M. B., 5 Church street 

Brewers. 
North Port Brewery Co. 

Brokers. 

Meldrum & Co., City road 
Whitlaw, David, High street 



Professions and Trades Directory. 



23 



Builders & Quarrymasters. 

Crabb, David, East Bank 
Dures, James, Damacre road 
Gordon & Rons, Union street 
Rough, Alex., Park road 

Butchers. 

Brechin United Co-Operative Beef 

Store, 33 Montrose street 
Eastmaus, Ltd., High street 
Lamb, James, Panmure street 
M'Intosh, James, Damacre road 
Reid & Barrie, 58 High street 
Do. Market street 

Strachan, J. M., 16 High street 
Thomson, Geo., & Son, South Port 
Whitton, A. & W., Montrose street 

and Church street 
Whitton, D., 5 High street 

Carters. 

Cameron, J. & P., Railway station 
Muir, Son & Patton, Ltd. . Railway stn 
Wordie & Co., Railway Station 

Chimney Sweeps. 

Falconer, J., School lane. 
Monro, D., Bridge street. 

China and Glass Dealers. 

Brechin United Co-Operative Society, 

Limited, High street 
Burns, Mrs., 27 River street 
Games, James, Scott street 
Gibb, Miss, High street 
Hutton, Alex., High street 
Stewart, D., Bridge street 
Tosh, WY, Wilson's park 
Whitlaw, David, High street 

Coach Builders. 
Simpson A., & Son, Clerk street 

Coal Merchants. 

Brechin United Co-Operative Society, 

Limited, Railway station 
Muir, Son, & Patton, Ltd., Rly. stn 
Smith, Hood, & Co., Martin's lane 



Confectioners. 

Belford, Alex., 28 High street 
Belford, J., Market stieet 
Belford, J. S., Panmure street 
Bell, Mrs, Kiimaird pi nee 
Hritcher, Miss, 30 Ma; ket street 
Brown, Bella. Montrose stieet 
Oraigie, H., Union stn et 
Games, James, Scott street 
Gellatly, J., 45 High street and 

24 St. David street 
Graham, Thomas, Damacre road 
Hebenton, Miss, High street 
Hosea, Miss, City Road 
Hutton, W., High street 
Johnston, Miss, Montrose street 
Lyall, Edw., Montrose street 
Morrison, Mrs. A., Montrose street 
Mudie, W., High street 
Peterkin, J., 9 High street 
Smith, Miss M., High street 
Souttar, Mrs, St. Mary street 
Tosh, Miss, Market street 
Watson, Geo., 54 High street 
Whitlaw, Miss, High street 
Young, E., South Port 

Corn Mercl ant. 

Milne, George, Swan street 

Cowfeeders and Dairymen. 

Eggo, Misses, Park road 
Hampton, R., Montro e street 
Neish, J., Gallowhill 
Nicol, Miss, Somervilla Dairy 
Reid, R., West Bank 
Robertson, Mrs, Moun '; pleasant 
Stevenson, A., Newington lane 
Todd, D., Montrose street 

Dentists. 

MacDuff, W. 8., Southesk street 
Shepherd, E. M., Swau street 

Distillers. 

Guthrie, Martin, & Co., Limited, 

.North Port 
G lencadam Distillery Company 

(A. G. Thomson & Coy., Ltd.) 

Drapers. 

Annan, T., High Street 
Beaton, M., The Corner 



24 



The Brechin Almanac and Directory for 1914. 



Brechin United Co-Operative Society, 
Limited, St. David street and High 
street 
Callander, James, High street 
Dakers, David, High street 
Ford, J. & W., 24 High street 
Gardyne, J., 14 Market street 
Hendry & Gardiner, St David street 
Hillocks, Misses, Montrose street 
Jamie & Mitchell, Misses, Swan st 
Jarron, James, 3 High street 
Lindsay, J. S., 20 High street 
Miller, Misses, St David street 
M 'Lagan, A., St. David street 
Morgan, Robert, 15 High street 
Paterson, D., High street 
Robertson, J. C, Swan street 
Robertson, Wm., High street 
Steel, Misses, Market street 

Dressmakers, Milliners, &c. 

Those marked * are Milliners only. 

Alexander, Miss, Bridge street 
Anderson, Miss, Park Road 
Brechin United Co-Operative Society, 
Limited, St. David street and High 

*Caird, Miss, 33 St. David st. 
Conn, Miss, St Ninian's place 
Cowie, Miss, Clerk street 
Drummie, Miss, Swan street 
Edwards, Misses, Union street 
Edwards, Misses, Argyll street 
Fettis, Miss, Panmure street 
Forrest, Miss, High street 
Gardyne, Mrs., 14 Market street 
Gray, Miss, Castle street 
Hampton, Miss, River street 
Hendry k Gardiner, St David street 
Hillocks, Misses, Montrose street 
Houston, Miss M. G., Ann terrace 
More, Miss M., Montrose street 
McOmie, Miss, Union street 
Morgan, Robert, 15 High street 
Nicoll, Miss B., Clerk street 
Nicoll, Misses, East Bank 
Nicoll, Miss M., Market street 
Ogilvy, J. A., 6 Oswald's buildings 
Robertson, J. C, 20 Swan street 
Sherret, Mrs, 64 Market street 
*Smart, Miss, St. David street 
Smith, Misses, 19 Southesk street 
Young, Miss, 13 Clerk Street 



Druggists. 

Crockart, W., High street 
Ferrier, W. M., 4 St. David st. 
Hutton, J., 8 High street 
Lamont, William, High street and 
Montrose street 

Electricians. 

Edwards, Jas., Union street 
Ferguson, J. H, & Co., Martin's lane 
Kinnear, J., & Sou, Market street 
Lammond, J., & Son, Market street 
North of Scotland Electric Light 
& Power Co., Ltd., Granary Road 

Fish Dealers. 

Keay, Alf., 51 High street 
Findlay, J. G., St. David street 

Fishing Tackle Makers. 

Murray David, Jun. , St. David st. 
Steel, W., Church street 

Flax Spinners. 
The East Mill Company, Limited 

Fruit Merchants and Green- 
Grocers. 

Belford, J. Scott, Panmure street 
Brown, Bella, Montrose street 
Duguid, Miss, Market street 
Duncan, James, Banks 
Keay, A., 55 High street 
Kidd, Chas., 76 High street 
Lyall, Ed., Montrose street 
Mitchell & Son, Swan street 
Monro, VV. , 4 Market street 
Oswald, Robt., High Street 
Ross, Wm., 27 High street 
Souter, Misses, 64 High street 
Young, E., South Port 

Furniture Dealers. 

Barrie, Jas., Clerk street 
Black, Wm., & Son, Clerk street 
Cooper, D., Maisondieu lane 
Davidson, A., St. Andrew st. 
United Co-operative Society, Ltd. 
Smith, D., River street 



Professions and Trades Directory. 



25 



Game Dealers. 

Cooper, Jas., 77 High street 
Findlay, J. G., St. David street 
(Smith, James, Scott street 

Gardeners (Jobbing). 

Burnett, Jas., Latch road 
Innes, J., City nursery 
Johnston, W. D., 43 High street 
Milne, R., Bridge street 
Strachan, Wm., 37 City Road 

Gardeners (Market). 

Barrie, Wm., Latch Road 
Duncan, James, Banks 
Low, George, Trinity Park 

General Dealers. 

Barrie, J., Clerk street 
Hosea, John, City road 
Sharpies, Joseph, 28 Bridge street 
Smith, D., River street 

General Jobbers. 

Anderson, Thos., Montrose street 
Cowieson, James, Montrose street 
Dunn, John M., Bank street 

Grocers (not Licensed). 

Anderson, J., & Son (Wholesale), 69 

Market street 
Brechin United Co-Operative Society, 
Limited — River street ; Montrose 
street ; 1 Witchden road ; South 
Port ; 1 St. David street ; and 
Southesk street. Office, 73 High 
street 
Collie, John, Market street 
Craigie, H., Union street 
Findlater, J., Montrose street 
Games, James, Scott street • 
Hampton, Mrs., 126 Montrose st 
Hill, Sophia, River street 
Keay, A., 55 High street 
Kidd, Chas., 76 High street 
Laing, Mrs., Montrose street 
Low, W., & Co., High street 
Lyall, Ed., Montrose street 
Milne, B. S., Montrose street 
M'Laren Mrs., St. James' place 
Morrison Mrs., Montrose street 



Murray, Mrs., 19 Market street 
Neish, Mrs,, Market street 
Nicol, Miss, City road 
Smith, David, River street. 
Smith, David, jun., Montrose street 
Souter, Misses, High street 
Steel, Misses, 70 Market street 
Stewart, Mrs., Montrose street 
Valentine, David, 2 St. Mary street 
Whitelaw, Miss, High street 
Williamson, Mrs., Bridge street 
Young, Mrs., 11 City road 

Grocers (Licensed). 

Bell, R., 11 Market street 
Cairncross, W. H., 39 St David street 
Esplin, Joseph, River street 
Fyffe, W., Market street 
Hampton, R., 1 High street 
Hendry, W. M., 17 Union street 
McMann, John, 100 High street 
Mitchell, C, & Son, Swan street 
Monro, Wm., 4 Market street 
Oswald, Robt., 4 High street 
Reoch. Walter, Montrose street 
Ross, Wm., 27 High street 
Smart, William N., 69 High street 
Stewart, Frank, 38 Union street 
Thomson, Miss, 159 Montrose street 
Wishart, W. C, 17 City road 

Gunsmiths. 

Murray, David, Jun., St. David st. 
Steel, Wm., Church street 

Hairdressers. 

Cameron, William, Montrose street 
Couttie, A., 103 High street 
Macdonald, C, 8 Market street 
Sinclair, J., Montrose street 
Smith, J., Panmure street 
Spence, David, & Son, 8 Swan street 

Hatters. 

Beaton, M., The Corner 
Birse, Mrs., 14-18 Swan street 
M 'Lagan, A., St. David street 

Horsehirers. 

Balharry, W., Brown Horse hotel 
stables, Clerk street 



26 



The Brechin Almanac and Directory for 191Jf. 



Gardyne, D. Cross Guns stables 
Manson, Wm., & Son, Commercial 

stables, and Edzell 
Oram, W. B., Crown hotel and West 

End stables 

Hotels. 

Balharry, W., Brown Horse Hotel, 

Market street and Clerk street 
Fullegar, Mark, Trinity Village 
Hatje, A., Commercial Hotel, Clerk 

street 
Jolly, Miss, Jolly's Hotel, Clerk st 
Lyon, James, Star Hotel, Southesk 

street 
Oram, William, Crown Hotel, St. 

David street 
Stewart, A., Dalhousie Hotel, 

Market street 

Ice Cream Merchants. 

Galaccio, G., High street 
Guiseppe, Vettese, Montrose street 

Innkeepers, &c. 

Bolag, Ltd., Church street and West 

End Bar 
Brown, James, City Royal Tavern, 

City road 
Clark, D., Bridge End Bar, River st. 
Conroy, John J., Exchange Inn, 10 

Church street 
Findlay, W., 73 Montrose street 
Honeyman, A., Railway Tavern, 

41 Damacre road 
North Port Brewery Co., (Porter 

and Ale), North port 
Smart, G. (Porter and Ale), Park 

road 
Smith, Robt., South Port Bar 
Smith, James E., The Eagle Inn, 

105 High street 
Whyte, John, Red Lion Tavern, 

Montrose street 

Inspector of Weights and 
Measures. 

Murray, D., St. David street 

Insurance and other Agents. 

BLACK & JOHNSTON, High st.— 
Advertising Agents and Agents 



for American, Anchor, Allan, Cun- 
ard, C.P.R., Dominion, Donaldson, 
Royal, and While Star Lines for 
America and Canada; Union-Castle 
Line for South Africa ; Orient Line 
for Australia and New Zealand ; 
P. & O. Line ; New Zealand Shipp- 
ing Coy. ; Shaw Savill & Coy. ; 
Royal Mail Steam Packet Coy., 
&c. Agents for issue of Railway 
Tickets to all parts ; Home and 
Foreign Tours, &c. ; for Ocean 
Accident and Guarantee Corpora- 
tion, Ltd. 

And, J. L., Panmure street— for 
State Fire Insurance Coy., Ltd. ; 
Equity and Law Life Assurance 
Society; Commercial Union Assur- 
ance Coy., Ltd. ; Royal Insurance 
Coy., Ltd. ; Ocean Accident and 
Guarantee Corporation, Ltd. ; 
Scottish Life Assurance Coy., Ltd. 

Anderson, C. & W., St. Mary street 
— for Caledonian Insurance Coy. 
(Fire) ; Scottish Widows' Fund ; 
and Phoenix Fire Insurance Coy. 

Boulton, A., ' St. David street — 
for Royal Insurance Co., Ltd., and 
Liverpool Victoria Insurance Cor- 
poration, Ltd. 

Brechin Equitable Co-operative So- 
ciety — for Co-operative Insurance 
Society 

Burnett, William, Montrose street — 
for the Scottish Legal Life Assur- 
ance Society 

Cameron, J. & P., Railway Station — 
Carting Agents to N.B. Rly. Co. 

Cuninghame, W. C, Clydesdale 
Bank — for the North British and 
Mercantile Insurance Company, 
Scottish Temperance, Guardian and 
Yorkshire 

Dalgetty, W., Montrose street — for 
Royal Liver Friendly Society 

Elliot, Robert — for Caledonian Rail- 
way Coy. 

Esplin, W.. 67 Montrose St.,- for 
Singers' Sewing Machines. 

Ferguson & Hood, Swan street — for 
the Bradbury Sewing Machines, 
vSingers' Bicycles, etc. 

Ferguson, F. A., Pan mil re street — for 
The Scottish Union and National 



Professions and Trades Directory. 



27 



Insurance Co. ; The Liverpool and 
London and Globe Insurance Co. ; 
Atlas Insurance Co. ; Yorkshire 
Insurance Co. 

Ferrier, C, Clydesdale Bank Build- 
ings — N. B. & M. Insurance Co.; 
General Accident Insurance Co. ; 
Century Insurance Co. ; Royal 
Insurance Co. 

Fleming, David, Union Bank Bldgs. 
— Treasurer Brechin Mutual Plate 
Glass Association 

Ford, J. & W., 24 High street— for 
Stevenson Bros., Dyers & Cleaners, 
Dundee, and Empress Laundry, 
Dundee 

Guthrie, David, & Sons, Swan street 
— for the Northern Assurance Co. 
(Fire and Life), and Scottish Provi- 
dent (Life) 

Guthrie, James, Swan street — for the 
Scottish Temperance (Life), Royal 
Insurance Coy. (Life and Fire) ; 
Caledonian Insurance Coy. (Life 
and Fire) ; London and Lancashire 
Fire Insurance Company 

Knowles, D. C, Martin's Lane — for 
Smith, Hood, & Co., Coal Mchnts. 

Lamb, John, Swan street — for the 
Scottish Union and National Insur- 
ance Company 

Milne, George, Swan street — for the 
Blaydon Manure Company 

Pirie, J., Goods Station — for the 
N. B. Railway Company 

Scott, James, Panmure street — for 
Scottish Amicable, Economic Life, 
and Caledonian Fire and Life 
Insurance Coy. ; Cunard Steam- 
ship Coy. ; Aberdeen Line to 
South Africa, &c. 

Shepherd, Geo., Clerk street — for 
the Scot. Accident Insurance 
Co. ; Equitable Fire Insurance Co. ; 
Equitable Gua antee and Accident 
Co. ; Standard Life Assurance Co. ; 
The Insurance Company of Scot- 
land; and Queen Fire and Life 
Insurance Company 

Shiell, J. & D. G., St. David street— 
for the Scottish Union and National 
Fire Insurance Co. ; Scottish Equi- 
table Life Assurance Society and 
Accident Assurance Company 



Steel, Misses, 70 Market street — 
for Pullar & Sons, Dyers, Perth 

Spalding, J., Park Road — for Prud- 
ential Assurance Coy. 

Todd, John, Black Bull close — for 
Patent Heddles 

Watt, D. M., 5 Union st.— for the 
London and Lancashire Fire Insur- 
ance Coy. 

Watt, William, & Son, 5 Union 
street— for the Royal Insurance 
Coy. ; also House Agents 

Will & Philip, Union Bank Bldgs.— 
for North British and Mercantile 
Insurance Coy. ; Royal Insurance 
Coy. ; English and Scottish Law 
Insurance Association ; Century 
Insurance Company ; and Scottish 
Amicable 

Wordie & Co., Railway station — 
Carting Agents to Caledonian Rail- 
way Company 

Iron Founders. 

More & Dargie, Montrose street 



Ironmongers. 

Ferguson & Hood, Swan street 
Napier, William, 21 High st. 
Smith, John, Market street 

Joiners and Cabinetmakers. 

Barrie, J. Clerk street 
Black, William, & Son, 20 Clerk st. 
Bruce, R. J. & J., Southesk street 
Cooper, D., Maisondieu lane 
Davidson, A., 2 St. Andrew st. 
Dures, James, Damacre road 
Hebenton, W., Montrose street 
Jamieson & Caird, 44 Union street 
Ogilvie, George, 58 Montrose street 
Watt, Wm. , & Son, Union street 

Local Publications. 

Brechin Almanac & Directory (The), 
price Id. — Published in Jany. by 
Black & Johnston, High st. 

Brechin Advertiser (The), price Id. — 
Published every Tuesday morning 
by D. H. Edwards, Black Bull close 



28 



The Brechin Almanac and Directory for 19 14- 



Edwards' Brechin Almanac Jc Hand- 
book, price Id. — Published in De- 
cember by D. H. Edwards. Black 
Bull close 

Manufacturers (Power-Loom) 

Duke, D. & R., Den Burn Works 
Lamb & Scott, Ltd.,Caldhame Works 
Smart, J. & J., Valley Works 

Manufacturer (Hand-Loom) 
Dakers, David, 92 High street 

Manure Merchants. 

Brechin Agricultural & Trading Co., 

Ltd., Park road 
Milne, George, Swan street 

Medical Practitioners. 
Adam, T. B., 37 Church street 
Anderson, John, Park road 
Cameron, H. F., Balgownie 
Campbell, M., Westwood 
Campbell, B. P., Panmure street 
Leishman, Thomas, Castle street 
Myles, Thomas P., 1 Castle street 

Monumental Mason. 
Davidson, Chas., Southesk street 

Motor Car Dealers. 
Davidson, John, Panmure street 
Kay, H. C, 18-20 Clerk street 
Milne, A., & Son, Clerk street 
Simpson, A., & Son, Clerk Street 

Musicsellers 
BLACK & JOHNSTON, 40 High st. 
Michie, J., Panmure street 

Music Teachers. 

Crabb, Miss, Clerk street 
Farquhar, J., Bishop's close 
Ferrier, Miss K., Southesk street 
Gilchrist, M. M., Park Road 
Hollingworth, J., Bank street 
Knowles, Miss, Southesk street 
Lamont, G. 0., Southesk street 

News Agents. 
BLACK & JOHNSTON, 40 High st. 
Alexander, William, St. David street 



Bell, John, High street 

Dutch, David, High street and St. 

Mary street 
Hendry, William, Swan street 
Paterson, Jas., 11 High street 
Robertson, D. B., Montrose street 

Newspaper Reporters. 

dimming, G., Panmure st. — Dundee 

Courier, Weekly Neivs, Telegraph 

and Post, and Scotsman. 
Hendry, J. C, Latch road — for 

Dundee Advertiser and People's 

Journal 
Napier, George, 15a Union st. — 

for Aberdeen Journal 
Watt, D. M., 5 Union street — for 

Glasgow Herald and Aberdeen Free 

Press 

Opticians 
Crockart, W., High street 
Guthrie, George, Panmure street 

Painters. 
Bruce, Wm., Southesk street 
Hutcheon, D. & J., St. David street 
MTntosh, D., Market st 
Middleton, J. C, Swan street 
Rae, Jas., High street 
Young, John, Montrose street 

Paper Makers. 

Guthrie, Craig, Peter, & Co, Ltd., 
Brechin Paper Mills 

Photographers. 

Forrest, George, Damacre Road 
Milne, A. C, Soixthesk street 
Steele, J., Bank street 

Picture-Frame Maker. 
Dunn, J. M., Bank street 

Plasterers. 

Gibson, James, Clerk street 
Thomson, C, East Bank 

Plumbers and Gasfitters. 
Edwards, James, Summerbauk lane 

and Union street 
Ferguson, J. H., & Co., Martin's lane 
Kinnear, Jas., & Son, 27 Market st. 
Kinnear, Robert, High street 
Lammond Jas.. & Son, 30 Market st. 



Professions and Trades Directory. 



29 



Potato Merchants. 

Allison, John, Commerce street 
Barrie, Wm., The Latch 
Duncan, J., Banks 
Keyes, J., Little Brechin 
Low, George, Trinity Park 
Smith, David, River street 
Smith, David, Jr., Montrose street 



Printers. 

BLACK & JOHNSTON, 40 High st. 
Alexander, W. & D., 41 High street 
Curmnmg, George, 30 Panmure st. 
Edwards, D. H., Brechin Advertiser 
office 

Rag Dealers. 

Burns, Mrs, 27 River street 
Hutton, A., High street 
Meldrum & Co., City road 
Stewart, David, Bridge street 
Tosh, W., Wilson's park 
Whitlaw, David, High street 

Reedmaker. 
Todd, John, Black Bull close 

Refreshment Rooms. 

Craigie, H., Union street 
Gellatly, Jas., St. David street 
Guiseppe, Vettese, Montrose street 
Hutton, W., High street 
Kidd, Mrs., High street 
Laing, Mrs., Montrose street 
Melvin, Mrs., High street 
Milne, B. S., Montrose street 
Mitchell, Miss, 46 High street 
Smart, G. M Park road 
Smith, David, Jun., Montrose street 
Valentine, Philip, Union street 
I 

Ropespinners. 

Finlay, R. & A., Montrose street 

Saddlers. 

Davidson, J., 19 St. David street 
Laurie, James, Panmure street 



Seedsmen & Nurserymen. 

Ferguson, W. H., Swan street 
Henderson & Sons, Den nursery 
Inglis, A. M., Clerk street 
Small, David, 20 Swan street 

Servants' Registry Offices. 

Britcher, Miss, 30 Market street 
Gardyne, Mrs., 14 Market street 
Gibb, Miss, 59 High street 
Herschell, Miss, High street 
M'Laren, Mrs., St. James' place 
Nicol, Miss, Somerville Dairy 
Scott, Miss, Market street 
Whitelaw, Miss, High street 

Sheriff-Officer. 
Watt, D. M., 5 Union street 

Slaters. 

Fraser, Wm., City road 
Hampton, W., Damacre road 
Scott, James, & Son, 48 Market st. 

Solicitors. 

Aird, J. L., Panmure street 
Anderson, C. & W., St. Mary street 
Ferguson, F. A., Panmure street 
Ferrier, Charles, Panmure street 
Jamieson, D. , Swan street 
Guthrie, T. Maule, Royal Bank 
Scott, James, Panmure street 
Shiell, J. & D. G., 14 St. David st. 
Will & Philip, 11 Panmure st. 

Tailors and Clothiers. 

Beaton, M., The Corner 

Birse, Mrs. John, 14 — IS Swan street 

Brechin United Co-Operative Society, 

Limited — High street and St. 

David street 
Callander, Jas., 20 High street 
Dear, David, 39 High street 
Hodge, Son & Duncan, 4 Swan st. 
Keith, Wm., Market street 
Kidd, Chas., High street 
Lindsay, J. G, 26 St. David street 
Merry, George, Montrose street 
Robertson, Jas., Montrose street 
Robertson, W., High street 
Smart, D. K., St. David street 



30 



The Brechin Almanac and Directory for 1914- 



Tea Merchants. 

Anderson, John, & Son, 69 Market st. 
Bell, John, Higl street 
Laing, Mrs., Mo ltrose street. 
London and Newcastle Tea Coy., 

87 High street 
Mitchell, C, Market street 
Smith, David, juu, Montrose street 
Young, Mrs, City road 

Tinsmiths. 

Ferguson & Hood, Swan street 
Fettis, J., Union street 
Kinnear, Robert, 104 High street 

Tobacconists. 

Bell, J., High street 
Duncan, Miss, Panmure street 
Herschell, Miss, 32 High street 
Lakie, Miss, Market street 
Lyall, Ed., Montrose street 
Macdonald, C, 8 Market street 
Milne, M., St. Kinian's place 
More, Miss M., Montrose street 



Mudie, W., High street 
Paterson, J as., 11 High street 
Smith, Miss M., High street 
Saiith, John, Panmure street 
Spence, D., & Son, 8 Swan street 
Stratton, G., 35 High street 

Upholsterers. 

Barrie, Jas., Clerk street 
Black, W. & Son, 20 Clerk st. 
Bruce, R. J., & J., Bank street 
Cooper, D., Maisondieu lane 
Davidson, A., 2 St. Andrew st. 

Veterinary Surgeon. 

McLaren, L., 50 City road 

Watchmakers St Jewellers. 

Clift, James, Market street 
Duncan, J., 4 St. James' place 
Guthrie, G., Panmure street 
Hutchison, John, Union street 
Mitchell, John, 20 High street 
Moir, George. 36 St. David street 
Sharpies, A., Bridge street 




General Directory. 31 



General Directory. 



Tow^i Council. 

William Ferguson, Provost and Chief Magistrate. 

George Henderson, Senior Bailie. 

Henry Chalmers Cargill, Junior Bailie. 

Thomas Moir, Dean of Guild ; David Fleming, Hon. Treasurer ; 

David Dakers, Hospital-Master. 

Councillors — David Dundas, George Monro Scott, Murdoch Beaton, David 

Matthew Watt, Alexander Stewart, John Paterson, 

Walter Muir Hendry. 

Committees, 
(First named on each acts as Convener) 

Finance — The whole Council, Hon. Treasurer Fleming, Convener. 

Sub-Finance — Hon. Treasurer Fleming, Provost Ferguson, Bailie 
Henderson, Bailie Cargill. 

Burgh Property and Charters — Provost Ferguson, Pailie Cargill, Dean 
of Guild Moir, Hon. Treasurer Fleming, Hospital-Master Dakers, Councillor 
Beaton. 

Casualties — Provost Ferguson, Hon. Treasurer Fleming, Councillor 
Watt, and the Town Clerk. 

Parliamentary Bills — Councillor Watt, Provost Ferguson, Bailie 
Henderson, Bailie Cargill, Dean of Guild Moir, Councillor Scott, Councillor 
Paterson. 

City Hall — Bailie Cargill, Provost Ferguson, Bailie Henderson, Dean of 
Guild Moir, Councillors Watt and Hendry. 

City Band — Councillor Scott, Provost Ferguson, Bailie Henderson, 
Hon. Treasurer Fleming, Councillors Dundas and Beaton. 

Bursaries — Provost Ferguson, I'ailie Cargill, Hon. Treasurer Fleming, 
The Town Clerk. 

Jubilee Park, Skating Pond, and Public Bowling Green — Councillor 
Paterson, Provost Ferguson, Hon. Treasurer Fleming, Councillors Dundas, 
Scott, and Watt. 

Water — Bailie Henderson, Provost Ferguson, I'ailie Cargill, Dean of 
Guild Moir, Hospital-Master Dakers, Councillors Dundas and Paterson. 

Sanitary and Cleansing — Councillor Beaton, Provost Ferguson, Bailie 
Henderson, Dean oi Guild Moir, Councillors Dundas, Scott and Stewart. 

Watching Lighting and Fire Engine — Bailie Cargill, Provost Ferguson, 
Hospital-Master Dakers, Councillors Scott, Beaton, and Hendry. 

Paving, Roads, and Improve.n%€»t$—T)^&u of Guild Moir, Provost 
Ferguson, Hospital-Master Dakers, Councillors Scott, Stewart, Paterson, 
and Hendry. 

Seivage Farm —Councillor Dundas, Provost Ferguson, Bailie Cargill, 
Dean of Guild Moir, Hon. Treasurer Fleming, Coun 'illors Watt and 
Stewart. 

Sale of Food and Drugs— Councillor Scott, Dean of Guild Moir, 
Councillors Beaton, Watt, Stewart, Paterson, and Hendry. 

Lean oj Guild Court — Dean of Guild Moir, Bailie Henderson, Hospital- 
Master Dakers, Councillors Watt and Hendry. 



32 



The Brechin Almanac and Directory for 19 H. 



Burgh Licensing Court — Provost Ferguson, Bailie Henderson, Bailie 
Cargill. 

Representatives to Montrose Harbour Board— Provost Ferguson, Bailie 
Henderson, Councillors Dundas and Beaton. 

Representative to District Lunacy Board of Forfar and Kincardine — 
Provost Ferguson. 

Representatives to Prison Committees — Perth, Bailie Henderson ; Dundee, 
Bailie Cargill. 

Old Age Pensions — Local Committee, the whole Council — Provost 
Ferguson, Convener ; James Scott, Clerk. 

To Forfarshire (Burghs) Licensing Appeal Court — Provost Ferguson, 
Bailie Henderson. 

To Forfarshire Territorial Force Association — Co-opted Member — The 
Town Clerk. 

To Secondary Education Committee for Forfarshire — Hon. Treasurer 
Fleming. 

To Forfar County Council under National Insurance Act, .1911 — Provost 
Ferguson, Bailie Henderson, Bailie Cargill, Councillor Watt ; to Finance 
Committee, Provost Ferguson, Councillor Watt ; to Committee of Manage- 
ment of Noranside Sanatorium, Councillor Watt. 

To Central Charities Committee — Hon. Treasurer Fleming, Bailie Cargill, 
Hospital-Master Dakers. 

Infectious Diseases Hospital Joint Committee. 

From Burgh Local Authority — Provost Ferguson, Bailie Henderson, 
Councillor Beaton. 

From the County Local Authority — Messrs Wm. Smith, George Bean, 
and Andrew Lindsay. 

Common Good Funds of the Burgh. 



£50,232 18 6£ 
25,863 6 1 



£24,369 12 


H 


£2,359 11 
2,207 6 


2 
1 


£152 5 


1 



Estimated Funds at 15th May 1913 

Debts and Obligations ... ... ... 

Surplus at 15th May 

Revenue for the year 1912-1913, was 
Expenditure for do. was 

Balance for year to 15th May 



Property and Funds held in Trust for Education. 

Black Bequest for Bursaries for young women. Property at Little 
Brechin, yielding yearly rental of £10. 

Dakers' Burtary. for young men. Property at Poet's Lane, of the 
yearly rental of about £22. These two were founded by the late Mr D. D. 
I lack, Town-Clerk. 

Chalmers- J ervise Bequest, for two scholarships for a boy and a girl. 
Capital sum of £810, yielding about £26 yearly. 

Fife Mortification — Yearly, £1 7s 9d. 

Linton Medal Bequest, for providing Medal for Latin Classes in the 
Grammar School. Amount, £46 17s 6d ; yearly value, £2. 



General Directory. 33 




Mortification for Burgh Teacher — £600 ; yearly value, now paid to 
School Board, £30. 

Endowment for Rector of Grammar School — Value, £177 15s ; yearly 
£8 17s 9d. 

The ^bove-mentioned Bursaries are in the presentation of the Council. 

Hospital Z'uA&s 

These are valued at £1604 16s lid, and during 1912-1913; 

yielded 

And the pa; ments to pensioners on the Fund and expenses 

amounted to 

Leaving a surplus for the period of 

Public Library 

Sum presented to the town by an Anonymous Donor for the 

Endowment of the Public Free Library ... ... ... £2000 

Mr H. M'Lellan, Chairman; William Manning, Clerk and Librarian. 

Committee of Management. 
From the Council — Provost Ferguson, Bailie Cargill, Dean of Guild 
Moir, Hon. Treasur-ei Flemin _■. neillors I - and ~;.-':z. From the 
Elector:-: — Messrs Etohert M ! ai mes Millar John Thomson, J. C 

Hendrj John Joe i Jam -j-'--'- 

Beqaests on bah'.." :: :::3 ?co? 3? the Parish cf 
Brechin (uos ni Ibtzlvi oi' Pu: :...l-. 7 :. 'i-4 

Gardner Bequest, b; .'■ " Rev. Alexander Gj Iner, . ' the Cathedral 
Church — Capital sum, £ 1 ); y€ ly vak , abouj; £31. Provost, 
Treasurer, i Hospife -] : ~ i r :>f Bred in, T . - i. 

Black Bequest, by the late Mr Alex. Black, of the ":a of Black £ 
Johnston, Bookse ! — O oital sum. £1000; yearly value, about £30. 
Kirk-Session of Brechin, Trastees. 

Duke Bequest, by the late Miss Duke, of Eskpark — Capital sum, £500. 

Craig Bequest by the late Mr James Craig, Town Clerk of Brechin, 
being residue of estate, and valued at £3750, the annual income there- 
from to be divided among the poor of the town not in receipt of Parochial 
relief, deserving widows with young families to have a preference. 

Burgh Officials 

Town Clerk, T. M. Guthrie ; Depute Town Clerk, A. A. Ogilvie ; Police 
Clerk, James Scott; Chief Constable, Sanitary Inspector, &c, David Smart ; 
Inspector of Markets, L. M'Laren, V.S. ; Inspector of Works and Water, 
William Eggie; Police Treasurer, Collector, and Town Chamberlain, Ed. 
W. Mowat ; Town Officer, Drummer, Collector of Petty Customs, &c. , 
John C. Stewart ; Public Steelyard, St. Ninian's Place, John Hardie, 
Weigher ; Inspector of Weights and Measures, David Murray ; Burgh 
Assessor, D. J. Carnegy ; Medical Officer and Police Surgeon, Dr. 
Norman J. Sinclair ; Burgh Analyst, G. D. Macdougald, F.I.C. ; Manager 



34 The Brechin Almanac and Directory for 1914- 



of Sewage Farm, Andrew Steel ; Keeper of Public Shambles, Wm. Law ; 
Keeper of Public Park, Public Bowling Green, and Skating Pond, James 
Ferrier ; Auditor of Burgh Accounts, Wm. R. Kydd, C.A., Dundee; 
Washing- House and Baths, Joseph Smith, Lessee. 

Police Court 

Ordinary Court held in the Burgh Court-Boom every Wednesday, when 
necessary, at 10 o'clock, and oftener when there is business. Judges, the 
Provost and Magistrates ; Procurator-Fiscal, David Smart ; Assessor, 
James Scott. 

Dean of Guild Court 

Meets in the Burgh Court-Room on the second and last Mondays of each 
month at 11 o'clock forenoon. 

Burgh Licensing" Court 

For the granting and renewal of Hotel, Public-House, and Grocers' 
Certificates. Held on the second Tuesday of April and third Tuesday 
of October within the Burgh Court-Room. Court — Provost Ferguson, 
Bailie Henderson and Bailie Cargill ; Assessor, T. M. Guthrie. 

Justice of Peace Small Debt Court 

Held in the Burgh Court-Room on the first Wednesday of each month 
at 12 o'clock noon. Clerk-Depute, Alexander Philip ; Procurator-Fiscal, 
William Anderson. 

Sheriff Small Debt Court 

Held in the Burgh Court-Room on the third Tuesdays of January, 
March, May, July, September, and November, at 11 a.m. Clerk-Depute, 
Alexander Philip. 

Fire Engine 

Engine House, Southesk Street. Keys at Police Station, Bank Street ; 
Captain, William Eggie. Fire Alarm, Police Office, Municipal Buildings. 

Stamp and Tax Office 

William Johnston, Sub-Disti'ibutor and Sub-Collector of Taxes, 40 High 
Street. 

Inland Revenue 

Excise Office — Gallowhill — G. H. Lawrence, Surveyor. North 
Port Distillery — P. Crowley, Officer, W. J. Bisset, Officer. Glencadam 
Distillery— W. A. Boulton Officer. 6 j. , 

Local Colportage Society 

Treasurer, Mrs. Jas. Bruce; Secretaries Rev. R. Paisley, Careston, and 
Rev. J. M. Hunter, Brechin ; John Owler, Colporteur. 



General Directory. 35 



Brechin Parish Council 

Chambers, 32 Pan mure Street. Chas. S. 0. Mills; Inspector. Office 
Hours, 10 a.m. till 5 p.m. ; Saturdays, 10 a.m. till 1 p.m. 

Mr David Duke, Chairman ; Mr A. C. Robertson, Vice-Chairman, 
Burohal Ward — David Duke, Manufacturer ; Miss Lucretia S. Duke ; 
George Henderson, Billposter ; Alfred O'Neil, Clerk ; Mrs. Elizabeth 
Coupar ; Charles Davidson, Sculptor ; Rev. Alex. Duncanson Macleod ; 
David Smith Karrie, Clerk ; James Williamson Addison ; James Scott 
Lindsay, Draper; James Dures, Joiner; William Dalgetty, Collector. 
Landward — Messrs Archibald Allison, Robert Barron, James Carnegie, 
Alex. C. Robertson, Jas. Todd. 

Committees. 

Law and Finance — All the members of the Parish Council. Mr. Alfred 
O'Neil, Convener. 

Almshouse — All the members of the Parish Council. Miss L. S. 
Duke, Convener. 

Cemetery — All the members of the Parish Council. Mr James S. 
Lindsay, Convener. 

Landward, Committee — Mr A. C. Robertson, Chairman. Representative 
to District Committee, Mr Jas. Carnegie. Clerk, Mr Chas. S. 0. Mills. 

Relief Committee — Whole Council. 

Registrar's Office 

32 Panmure Street. Chas. S. 0. Mills, Registrar ; William Peat, 
Assistant. Hours — 11 a.m. till 2 p.m. ; Saturdays, 11 a.m. to 12 noon ; 
Mondays, Tuesdays, and Fridays, 6 till 8 p.m. 

Notice of a birth requires to be given to the Registrar within twenty- 
one days after its occurrence ; of a marriage within three days after the 
celebration ; of a death, within seven days after the event, and before the 
interment. Along with the registration of a birth, the date of the marriage 
of the parents must be given. Penalty for neglect, £5. Parents or 
guardians must lodge with the Registrar, within six months from the birth 
of the child, a certificate of vaccination or a form of declaration, signed 
before a Magistrate or Justice of the Peace, that they conscientiously believe 
that vaccination would be prejudicial to the health of the child. 

Parochial Assessments 

Burgh — Poor Rate — As Owner, at 6|d per £ ; as Tenant, at 8d per £. 
School Rate — As Owner, at lO^d.per £ ; as Tenant, at ll^d per £. Burial 
Ground— As Owner, Jd per £ ; as Tenant, Id per £. Registration — As 
Owner, £d per £ ; as Tenant, £d per £. 

Landward — Poor Rate — Owners, 6Jd per £ ; Tenants, 8d per £. 
School Rate — Owners, 3d per £ ; Tenants, 4d per £. Burial Ground — 
Owners, gd per £ ; Tenants, Id per £. Registration — Owners, £d per £ ; 
Tenants, £d per £. 

Police and other Assessments 

General Purposes, lid per £ and Library, Id per £ on Occupiers. Roads 
and Bridges — Owners, 4d per £ ; Tenants, 4d per £. Water Supply — 
Owners, Id per £ ; Tenants, Id per £. Sewers— Owners, 3d per £ ; Tenants, 



36 The Brechin Almanac and Directory for 1914- 



3d per £. Valuation and Registration — Owners, ^d per £ ; Tenants, Jd per 
£. Sanitary and Joint Hospital — Owners, Hd per £ ; Tenants, ljd per £. 
Public Park — Owners, Id per £ ; Tenants, Id per £. 

Office — Municipal Buildings. Ed. W. Mowat, Treasrrer and Collector. 
Hours of attendance —from 10 a.m. till 1 p.m., and from 6 to 8 evening ; 
Saturdays, from 10 a.m. till 12 noon. 

District Schools and Teachers 

Aldbar A. C. Robertson, F.E.I.S. 

Arrat ... ... ... ... .. Miss Muckart 

Careston ... H. M. Rodgers 

Edzell ... ... ... ... ... Jas. Hood 

Farnell ... W. S. Lothian 

Fern J. Miller 

Lethnot ... ... ... ... ... Wm. Paterson 

Little Brechin ... ... ... ... Charles Richard 

Lochlee ... ... ... ... ... Sam. Cruickshanks 

Logie-Pert ... ... ... ... ... George Porteous 

Menmuir ... ... ... ... ... Robert Grimm 

Stracathro ... ... ... ... ... James M. Mills 

Waterside Miss I. Black 

Schools and Teachers 

Brechin High School (Secondary Department) — Rector, James Taggart, 
M.A., B.Sc. ; Classical Master, James Milne, M.A. ; Mathematical and 
Science Master, James Taggart ; Modern Languages, John S. M'Alley ; 
Assistants, Robert B. Lyall. Miss Wallis, M.A., M. T. Higgins, Miss 
Mary Ewing, and Miss M. M'Alley, (Preparatory Department), Miss 
Mitchell and Miss Sybil Elliot, M.A. 

Damacre Road School — Headmaster, Robert M'Lellan, F.E.I.S.; 
Assistants, George A. Ross, Misses Jane Bruce, Bessie F. Mitchell, Marjory 
D. Barty, Edith Colville, R. Elliot, Mary T. Fullerton, Mina C. Bruce, 
and Helen A. Stephen. 

Bank Street School — Headmaster, J. D. Ross ; Assistants, Thomas 
Blyth, M.A., Misses A. Hampton, Agnes Ferrier, A. H. Willocks, Jessie 
Scott, A. B. Mitchell, Mary McKinney. and Elsie C. MoLellan. 

Tenements School — Headmaster, R. A. Scott, M.A. ; Assistants, Alan 
MacCullie, Misses Christina Grimm, Jessie W. Soutar, Kate A. Myles, A. 
Whitlaw, Jeanie Duncan, Elizabeth Hay, Ida G. Whitlaw, E. Lowrie, 
M.A., and Mrs. E. Kinghorn, 

Evening Continuation Classes — Headmaster, Geo. A. Loss. 

Cookery and Laundry School (Union Street)— Miss Camming and Miss 
Knowles. 
' Art Master — F. H. Sangster. 

Music Master — Geo. D. Lamont, A.R.C.O. 

Master of Method — Junior Students, Brechin Centre — Robt. M'Lellan, 
Damacre Road School. 

Compulsory Officer and Drill Instructor — James Neish. 

Kindergarten School — St. Andrew's Lane — Misses Sievwright. 



General Directory. 



37 



Bursaries 

Smith Brothers'' Bursaries — Founded in 1878 by Messrs John Smith and 
Peter Smith, of Andover, Mass., U.S.A.. natives of Brechin. Funcs yield 
about £120 annually. Governors, Burgh Seh >ol Board — r \ > be applied for the 
purpose of enabling the child ->> of \ ersi i s of lim t d means, ■who are 
receiving their education at the public- schools in th« burgh and parish of 
Brechin, to receive higher education at any Secondary School, Normal 
School, or University, or at any School where higher education is given, 
approved Of by the Patrons. Examinations held in June, and Bursaries 
awarded in October. 

Black Bequest— Town Council, Patrons. Founded by the late Mr D. D. 
Black, to provide an annual Bursary or Scholarship for assisting any young 
woman or young women in purs ting her or their studies at any Literary or 
Scientific Institution or Seminary proper for trade or profession such young 
woman has in view. Open to young women who, for five consecutive years 
immediately previous to appointment, have been resident in any one or 
more of the following parishes, viz. : — Brechin, Lochlee, Eethnot, Navar, 
Edzell, Stracathro, Menmuir, Fern, Farnell. Value of Bursary, about £10. 
The same young woman may bo presented from year to year, but not ex- 
ceeding five years. Patronage to be exercised as near the 3rd of July as 
convenient. 

Bakers' Bursary —Town Council, Patrons. Also founded by the late Mr 
D. D. Black. Proceeds to be applied by the Council in providing a 
Bursary or Scholarship tenable by young men, ai>d the conditions being — 
1st, That the Bursar must Lave been for three years ; . least educated at 
the Brechin Grammar School ; 2s ,! . That the Borsary may be applied in 
assisting him in pui'siring his studies at any Universi y, as well as, at a 
Literary or Sciwi'tific Institution or Seminary ; and 3rd, That it is not 
necessary that the Bursar has resided in any particular parish, but only 
that he is a native of Great Britain. Annua) Income, about £26. 

Ball's Bequest — The ministi r and elders of the West United Free Church, 
Brechin, Endowment Trustees of the late Mr James Dall. authorised to 
apply income of Trust in assist! ig to educate young men for the ministry 
of the United Free Church of Scotland. Parties to have preference — 1st, 
Of the Testator's owu kindred ; 2nd, Of the name of Dall ; and 3rd, Natives 
— father resident in the parish of Brechin for not less than five yearrs. 

Chalmers- Jervise Bequest — Tt.wn Council, Patrons. Founded by the late 
Mr Andrew Jervise for the purpose of providing two Scholarships, each to 
be tenable for fmr years by a boy and a gi»l respectively — whether Roman 
Catholic orany , ther persuasion — whose agesshallnot be under 9 nor above 
12 last I irthday an ■ who shi 11 have b< en edi eated at some male or female 
School ■; or arise of B schin, the childre of deceased 

parent&a ■:.':- ing a . fferenee — fhc^ :shavi an annual 

income of £75 arc. iij ■ - ; excluded. The election to the scholar- 

ship is in every case confi ted the boy or gi •: . . 1 stand highest for 

good eonduct and scholarship on the joint report of the Teacher and the 
School Inspector ka . mi >out £20. 

Murray Bequest — Trustees a ithorised by the late Mr Alexander Murray 
to pay oai/ of the income from bis estate such sum as they may deem proper 
to assist young men, natives of the parish of Brechin, in prosecuting their 
studies at any of the Colleges of Scotland. 



38 



The Brechin Almanac and Directory for 1914.. 



M'Cosh Bursary — Patrons, East United Free Church, Brechin. Founded 
in 1893 by President M'Cosh, of Princetown, for the purpose of assisting 
any young man of good moral character, connected with the congregation, 
in prosecuting his studies for the ministry of the United Free Church of 
S cotlaad. Capital sum, £250. 

Brechin Branch Operative Tailors' Society 

President, M. Currie ; Treasurer, J. Stewart ; Secretary, John Bushnell, 
Damacre Road. 

School Boards 

Burgh — Rev. A. D. Tait Hutchison, Chairman ; Messrs D. Jamieson, 
J. C. Robertson, George Cumming, Rev. H. C. Cargill, Messrs James 
Scott, and M. B. Lamb. J. S. Kinghorn, Clerk ; William Anderson, 
Treasurer ; James Neish, Officer. 

Landward — Rev. A. D. Tait Hutchison, Chairman. Messrs James 
Carnegie, Arrat ; Geo. J. Doig, Middle Drums ; John B. McNab of 
Keithock ; Alex. Philip, Clerk and Treasurer. 



Cemetery, &c. 

New Cemetery, Southesk Street — Opened 1857. C. S. 0. Mills, 
Treasurer ; Frank Gray, Keeper. 

Kirk yard, Cathedral — A. Philip, Clerk and Treasurer. 
Magdalen Chapel, Montrose Road — Interments rare. 

Brechin Victoria Nursing' Association 

Hon. President, the Countess of Dalhousie ; Hon. Vice-Presidents, 
Mrs Adamson, Careston, Mrs Jas. Guthrie, and Mis3 Duke, Bearehill 
President, James Guthrie ; Vice-Presidents, David Duke and Rev. Dr Coats 
Joint Secretaries, Mrs Hutchison, The Manse, and Miss L. S. Duke 
Bearehill ; Hon. Treasurer, James Scott, Solicitor, 14 Panmure Street 
Hon. Auditor, J. L. Aird, Solicitor ; Nurses, Misses M. and I. Newlands 

Brechin Gas Company, Limited 

Directors — James Guthrie, Chairman ; David Dakers, Vice-Chairman ; 
William Johnston, James Scott, D. W. Galloway ; Secretary, T. M. 
Guthrie, Solicitor ; Manager, Collector, and Treasurer, Allan Reid. 

Session Clerks 

Brechin Parish (Cathedral) — Robt. M'Lellan, Garpock House, Pearse 
Street. East Parish — R. Oswald, Glebe House. Gardner Memorial — Rev. 
Al. Middleton, B.D., The Manse, Pearse Street 

Loyal Order of Ancient Shepherds 

Maisondieu Lodge, OJ^l. — Instituted in 1884. Meets in Masonic Hall 
on alternate Tuesday evenings at 7.30. T. Pender, W.M. ; A. E. 
Samson, Secretary ; J. M'Nab, Treasurer. 

Juvenile Branch — Committee — A. Milne, P. Watson Watt, A. O'Neil ; 
A. E. Samson, Secretary. 



General Directory. 39 



Ancient Order of Foresters 

Court Brechin Castle, No. 6950 — Meets in Temperance Hall on alternate 
Tuesday evenings at 8 o'clock. Jas. Morgan, C. R. ; J. S. Irvine, Secretary; 
H. L. Dewars, Treasurer. 

Ancient Free Gardeners 

Southe.sk Lodge, No. 205 — David Dake s, VV.M. ; R. Henderson, Ann 
Terrace, Secretary ; John Bruce, Assistant Secretary ; Leith Duncan, 
Treasurer. 

Caledonian Order of United Oddfellows 

Catterthun Lodge, No. 29 — Meets in Temperance Hall every alternate 
Friday — W.M., F. Mann ; Treasurer, A. Dow ; Secretary, Fergus Reid, 
194 Montrose Street ; Check Secretary, Alex. Fawns. 

Clubs. 

Lawn Tennis— Brechin— Court, Park Road. Hon. Presidents, Ex- 
Provost Scott and Mr. D. Duke ; President, Ex-Provost Guthrie ; Vice- 
President and Secretary, G. M Scott ; Treasurer, J. W. Henderson. 

Angling Club— Patron, Earl of Dalhousie ; Hon. Presidents, Christopher 
Wood and D. G. Shiell ; President, W. Anderson ; Vice-President, E. 
W. Mowat ; Secretary and Treasurer, D. Dutch, High Street. Com- 
petitions in April, June, and July. 

Bowling Club — Instituted 1869 — President, Allan Reid ; Vice- 
President, David Fleming; Secretary, A. H. Robertson ; Treasurer, Andrew 
Wallace ; Curator, J. C. Robertson. 

Public Bowling Club — Instituted 1908— Patroness, Mrs R. W. Duke, 
Patron, Right Hon. Earl of Dalhousie ; Hon. President, D. Duke ; Chair- 
man, John Paterson ; Presidents, Ex-Bailie Dakers and Jas. Lyon ; 
Treasurer, D. Binnie ; Secretary, J. Lindsay. 

Golf Clubs — Artisan Club — Hon. President, The Earl of Dalhousie ; 
President, Ex- Provost Guthrie ; Vice-President G, M. Scott; Captain, D. 
Thomson ; Vice-Captain, J. F. Lammond ; Secretary, J. Philip, Montrose 
Street ; Treasurer, Alexander Stewart. 

Ladies Golf Club — Captain, Miss Cuninghame ; Vice-Captain, Miss 
Ferrier-Mitchell ; Secretary aud Treasurer, Miss B. F. Mitchell. 

Trinity Golf Club — President, David Murray : Captain, C. Ferrier ; 
Vice-Captain, Charles Richard ; Secy, and Treas., Wm. Law. 

City Club — Mechanics' Institution Buildings. Chairman, J. C. Robertson; 
Secretary and Treasurer, F. A. Ferguson ; Committee — Messrs J. C. 
Robertson, C. Ferrier, J. S. Melrose, and J. Mitchell. Keeper — W. 
Davis. 

Liberal Club — Hon. Presidents, Right Hon. The Lord Morley and R. V. 
Harcourt, M.P. ; President, John Lamb ; Vice-Presidents, James Guthrie, 
D. l>uke, Ex-Provost Guthrie ; Secretary and Treasurer, C. Ferrier ; Com- 
mittee, Messrs T. Moir, and D. M. Watt. • 



40 The Brechin Almanac and Directory for 1914- 



Eastern District of Forfarshire Horse Club — President, Right Hon. The 
Earl of Dalhousie : Secretary and Treasurer, I >. Arnot, Mains, Edzell 

Brechin Burns Club — Instituted March, 1894. Hon. Presidents, D. H. 
Edwards and Ex-J.'rovost Scott; President, Ex-Bailie Anderson ; Vice- 
President, Chas. Thomson ; Hon. Secretary and Treasurer, F. C. 
Anderson. 

New Club — Argyle Street. Jas. Smart, President ; H. P. Gordon, 
Secretary and Treasurer. Committee — G. Shepherd, David Lamb, 
and Geo. A. Scott. Club Keeper, Mrs J. Black. 

Cricket Club — Brechin — Patrons, The Right Hon. The Earl of Southesk, 
The Right Hon. The Earl of Dalhousie, J. Carnegy Arbuthnott, Esq., W. 
Shaw Adamson, Esq., Patrick Chalmers, Esq., and Christopher Wood, Esq.; 
Hon. Presidents, G. A. Scott and G. M. Scott ; Captain, C. Ferrier ; 
Vice-Captain, D. W. Galloway ; Secretary and Treasurer R. C. Laing ; 
Ground — Nursery Park. Second Eleven — Captain, D. Dakers ; Vice- 
Captain, Ronald Gordon ; Secretary. D. Dakers. 

Football Clubs— Brechin City — President, Charles Smith ; Vice-Presi- 
dent, W. Oram ; Treasurer, P. Mackay ; Secretary, Geo. Cumming. 
Hearts — Secretary, D. Macfarlane, Wednesday Half-Holiday — Secretary , 
James Clark. 

Yearly Societies. 

Bridge Street Benefit Yearly Society — Meets at 12 Bridge Street, on 
Monday evenings from 6.30 to 8 o'clock. President, W. Ross; Secretary 
and Treasurer, Jas. Steel. Breaks up at end of December. 

Union Street Deposit and Friendly Yearly Society — Money deposited 
every Friday evening, from 7 to 8.15 o'clock, at the Society's Rooms, 
Union Street. President, Gordon Forbes ; Secretary, James M'Nab ; 
Treasurer, W Thomson. 

South Port Deposit and Friendly Yearly Society— Money deposited every 
Friday evening from 7 to 8. 15 o'clock, in the Society's Rooms, 12 Bridge 
Street. President, John Forbes ; Secretary, John Sandeman ; Treasurer, 
John Shand. 

The Brechin Building Trades' Yearly Society —Meetings in Temperance 
Hall every Friday evening, from 7 to 8.15 o'clock. President, A. Burns; 
Secretary, John Coupar, Jr. ; Treasurer, G. Findlay. 

Shoemakers' Deposit Society— President, J. Fyfe ; Secretary, John 
Paterson ; Treasurer, R. C. Whyte. 

United Operative Plumbers' Association of Scotland. 

Secretary and Treasurer for Brechin Members, T. Edwards. 

Incorporated Trades 

Ouildri) Incorporation— Incorporated 1666. The interest of the invested 
money of this body is spent in Pensions to decayed Members and w ia° ws 
of decayed Members. Dean, Jas. Guthrie; Treasurer and Fiscal, T. Maule 
Guthrie; Clerk, W. Anderson. Funds, fully £900. 



General Directory. 41 



Young Men's Christian Association 

Instituted 1866. Meets in the Institute, Bank Street. Hon. Presidents, 
James Guthrie and T. M. Guthrie ; Presidents, Hon. Treasurer Fleming, 
J. S. Melrose, and John Gordon ; Secretary, A. J. Hutcheon ; Treasurer, 
Robert Taylor ; Librarian and Hallkeeper, Robert Gold. 

Young* Women's Christian Association 

Instituted 1880. Meets in the Association Rooms, Southesk Street. 
Hon. President, Mrs Don, Maulesden ; Secretary, Mrs Bruce, Park 
Road ; Assistant Secretary, Miss Neish, Union Street ; Treasurer, Miss 
Moir, City Road ; Literature Secretary, Miss Cobb, Market Street ; 
Organist, Miss A. Cameron. 

British Women's Temperance Association 

Hon. Presidents, Mrs Don, Maulesden, and Mrs James Guthrie ; 
President, Mrs James Bruce ; Vice-Presidents, Mrs P. W. Watt and Miss 
Gardiner ; Secretary, Miss Gardiner, Latch ; Treasurer, Miss Kate 
McDonald ; Roll-keeper, Mrs Duke, Bearehill Garage ; Magazine Secretary, 
Mrs. Christison. 

" T" Branch — President, Mrs Bruce ; Vice-Presidents, Mrs Loudon, 
City Road U.F. Manse, and Mrs Hunter, Maisondieu U.F. Manse; Secre- 
tary, Miss Laing ; Roll-keepers, Miss Hutcheon and Miss Strachan ; 
Treasurer, Miss Ritchie; Badge Superintendent, Miss Ross; Organist, Miss 
Hutcheon. 

Temperance Societies. 

Total Abstinence Society — President, Mr D. M. Watt ; Vice-President, 
Mr P. W. Watt ; Secretary, Mr J. B. Todd, 10 Smith's Lane ; Hall- 
keeper, Mr J. Stewart ; Treasurer, Mr G. Guthrie ; Registrar, Mr George 
A. Moir, 36 St David Street. Directors— Messrs G. M. Aitken, David 
Lowe, James Nairn, James Wallace, Mrs Christison, and Mrs P. W. Watt. 
East U.F. Church Temperance Society — President, Rev. E. T. Thomson ; 

Vice-President, Mr Jas. Guthrie, J. P. ; Secretary and Treasurer, ; 

Committee, Messrs Jas. Christison, J. C. Middleton, and James Scott. 

East U.F. Church Band of Hope — Superintendents, John Owler and 
G. Martin ; Secretary, John Paterson. 

The National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty 
to Children 

Scottish Branch — Hon. President, The Right Hon. the Countess of Dal- 
housie; Hon. Vice-President, Mrs Don, Maulesden; President, The 
Provost of Brechin [ex officio) ; Hon. Secretary and Treasurer, Charles 
Ferrier, solicitor ; Committee, Mrs J. B. Don, Maulesden ; Mrs Coats, 
Mrs A. D. Tait Hutchison, Miss L. S. Duke, Mra David Duke, Miss McNab, 
Miss J. Lamb, Miss Smart, Miss Melrose, Miss Don, Mr T. Maule 
Guthrie, Rev. Walter W. Coats, D.D., Rev. A. D. Tait Hutchison, and 
Dr T. B. Adam, Church Street. 



42 



The Brechin. Almanac and Directory for 191J/.. 



League of Pity 

Brechin Castle Associate Circle — Hod. President, The Right Hon. The 
Countess of Dalhousie ; President, Mrs Don ; Treasurer, Miss Melrose ; 
Secretary, Miss Peter, Oak Bank 

Children's Branch — Secretary, Mrs. David Duke, Esk Park. 



President, Geo 
Treasurer, George Mitchell 



Ornithological Society 

Davidson ; Vice-President, John Craig ; Secretary and 
Assistant Secretary, W. Aikenhead. 



Horticultural Society 

Reformed in September 189S. Hon. Presidents, James Guthrie and 
D. Duke ; President, Ex-Provost Beaton ; Secretary, R, S. Quarry ; 
Treasurer, James Oswald. 

Public Park 

Park Road. Open during Summer months from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. 
From sunrise to sunset during Winter, and from 1 p.m. on Sabbath. 
Curators — Earl of Dalhousie, G. A. Scott, John Lamb, D. Spence. Charles 
Davidson, F. A. Ferguson, Bailie Henderson, Councillors Moir and 
Paterson ; Hon. Secretary, T. Maule Guthrie, Town Clerk. 

Jubilee Park 

Duke Bequest — Sum of £500 bequeathed by the late Eobert Duke, Esq. 
of Bearehill, the annual income from which to be applied for the upkeep 
of the Victoria Jubilee Park. 

Public Halls 

City Hall, Swan Street — John Stewart, keeper. 

Mechanics' Hall — Wm. Davis, keeper. 

Temperance Hall, City Road — Jas. Stewart, keeper. 

Masonic Hall, Church Street — A. Paton, keeper. 

Young Men's Christian Association, Bank Street — Robert Gold, keeper. 

Drill Hall, Bank Street — Col-Sergt. Arthur, keeper. 

Parish Church Hall — A. Bruce, keeper. 

St. Andrew's Episcopal — D. Dewar, keeper. 

St. Ninian's Hall, Market Street — Jas. Oswald, keeper. 

Maisondieu Hall — Jas. Neish, keeper. 

Rechabite Hall — Miss Milne, keeper. 

Literary Societies 

Brechin Literary Society — President, T. M. Guthrie ; Vice-Presidents, 
Mrs. Taggart, M.A., Charles Davidson, and D. Murray; Treasurer, Andrew 
Wallace ; Secretary, David Fleming, solicitor. Meets alternate Fridays 
in Mechanics' Institute. 

South Port Mutual Improvement Society — Open every day from 7 a.m. till 
10 p.m. Business Meeting on Thursday evenings at 8 p.m. President, 
Jas. Dures ; Vice-President, D. Thomson ; Secretary, W. Dalgetty, 
Treasurer, A. Dewars ; Finance Secretary, Jas. Law ; Hallkeeper, D. 
Thomson. 



General Directory. 43 



Montrose Street Mutual Improvement Society and Reading Room — Open 
daily. Business meeting, Monday evenings, at 8 o'clock. President, Jas. 
Dakers ; Vice-President, John Scott; Secretary, James Philip; Treasurer, 
David Porter; Financial Secretary, A. Craig. 

District Clergy List 

ORDAINED 

Rev. David Nelson, M.A., Established Church, Aberlemno - 1905 
,, Vacancy Established Church, Dun - - 

,, Ivo M. Clark, M.A., B. D., Established Church, Farnell - 1912 

,, James Coodlet Robertson, Established Church, Lethnot - 1905 

,, Robert C. Mitchell, Established Church. Fern - - 1898 

,, Brodie S. Gilfillan, B.D., Established Church, Tannadice 1908 

,, J. D. M'Lean, M. A., B.D., Established Church, Maryton - 1899 

,, Walter W. Coats, D.D., Established Church (Cathedral) Brechin 1880 

,, A. D.Tait Hutchison, Established Church (Cathedral), Brechin 1893 

,, A. Middleton, B.D., Gardner Memorial Church - - 1892 

,, James Landreth, Established Church, Logie-Pert - - 1876 

,, Robert Paisley, Established Church, Careston - - 1883 

,, Win. Newlands, Established Church, Stracathro - - 1900 

,, H. C. Cargill, Established Church (East), Brechin - - 1905 

,, David Williamson, Established Church, Edzell - - 1905 

,, J. Stewart, Established Chuich, Lochlee - - . - 1885 

,, D. A. Vipont, Established Church, Menmuir - - 1895 

,, John Fraser, West U.F. Church, Brechin - - - 1865 

,, James Paterson, colleague and successor, West U.F. Church 1902 

,, Wm. Loudon, City Road U.F. Church, Brechin - - 1907 

,, R. Workman Orr, Bank Street U.F. Church, Brechin - 1863 

,, A. D. McLeod, M.A., colleague and successor, Bank Street 

U.F. Church ...... 1910 

,, Edmund T. Thomson, East U.F. Church, Brechin - - 1891 

,, J. M. Hunter, M.A., Maison Dieu U.F. Church, Brechin - 1909 

„ T. C. Sturrock, U.F. Church, Edzell - - - 1891 

,, A. Monro, U.F. Church, Menmuir .... 1898 

,, J. Paul, U.F. Church, Lochlee .... 1890 

,, A. L. Roberton, U.F. Church, Logie Pert - - - 1876 

., John M. Shaw, M.A., colleague and successor, Logie Pert 

U.F. Church - - - - - - 1909 

,, W. A. Mitchell, U.F. Church, Muirton - - - 1870 

,, John M. Craig, U.F. Church, Memus - - 1S86 

„ J. Haggart Clark, U.F. Church, Aberlemno - - - 1901 

,, Alexander Mitchell, E.U. Church, Brechin - - - 1881 

,, K. L. Reid, Scotch Episcopal Church, Brechin - - 

,, W. Presslie Scotch Episcopal Church, Lochlee - - 1869 

Bank Offices 

Bank Hours, 10 till 3 ; Saturdays, 10 till 12. 
British Linen Bank, Clerk Street— Geo. Shepherd, agent. 
Clydesdale Bank, Panmure Street — W. C. Cuninghame, agent. 
National Bank of Scotland, St. David Street— D. G. Shiell, agent; A. 

Wallace, sub-agent. 
Royal Bank of Scotland, Swan Street — David Guthrie & Sons, agents. 
Union Bank of Scotland, Swan Street — M. B. Lamb and Alex. Philip, agents. 



44 The Brechin Almanac and Directory for 1914- 



Good Templar Lodges 

Hope of Angus Lodge — Meets in the Union Street Hall, every Thursday 
evening at 8 o'clock. Lodge I eputy, Jas. Bruce. 

Hojoe of Brechin Juvenile Lodge — Meets in the Temperance Hall, every 
Tuesday evening, at 7 o'clock. T. B. Todd, supt. 

Pride of the Lsh, Ao. 1028 — Meets in the Bechabite Hall, on Tuesdays 
at 8 o'clock. Lodge Deputy, Jas. Burnett. 

Instrumental Bands 

Brechin City Brass Band — Meets for practice in Band Hall, Bridge 
Street, every Monday and Thursday at 8 o'clock p.m. A. Hutton, 
Bandmaster. 

Highland Reel and Strathspey Society — Meets for practice every Monday 
night, in Temperance Hall. President and^Conductor, D. Low ; Secretary 
and Treasurer, A. Hutcheon. 

HoUingivorth's Band — Leader, J. Hollingworth. 

Kean's Quadrille Band — Leader, F. Kean. 

Bae's Quadrille Band— Leader, Jas. Rae. 

Select Choir 

President, J. E. Robertson ; Secretary and Treasurer, H. Crighton ; 
Conductor, W. J. Farquhar ; Assistant Conductor, A. Rankin ; Pianist, 
Miss Knowles. 

Amateur Musical Society 

President, Dr Anderson ; Hon. Secretary and Treasurer, 

Conductor, Geo. Lamont, A.R.C.O. 



Local Carriers 

Montrose — W. Smith, Damacre Road - - Daily except Thursday 

Careston— John Milne .... Friday 

Brechin and District Poultry and Pigeon Society 

President, John Melrose ; Treasurer, John Christie. 

Photographic Association 

President, Wm. Shaw Adamson, Esq. of Careston ; Vice-Presidents, T. 
M. Guthrie and J. 0. Ross; Secretary, D. M. Witt ; Treasurer, Air. R. 
Keay ; Curator, G. A. Moir ; Lanternist, A. Colv.ile. 

International Ploughmen's Society of Scotland 

Brechin Branch— President, John Irons; Secretary, Charles Strachan ; 
Treasurer, Wm. Petrie. Meets on second Saturdays of June, September, 
December, and March. 



General Directory. 45 



Mill and Factory Workers' Union 

Hon. President, John C. Hendry ; Treasurer, J. Watson ; Secretary, 
G. Napier; Collector, D. Craig. 

Places of Worship 

Cathedral Parish Chiwch (First Charge) - Rev. W. W. Coats, D.D. 

Do. (Second Charge) Rev. A. D. Tait Hutchison, M.A. 

East Parish Church, City Eoad ... - Rev. H. C. Cargill 

Gardner Memorial Church, Southesk Street . Rev. A. Middleton, B.D. 
West U.F. Church, Chuich Street .... Rev. John Fraser 

Colleague and successor, Rev. James Paterson, M.A. 
East U.F. Church, Panmure Street - - - Rev. E. T. Thomson 

Bank Street U.F. Church Rev. R. Workman Orr 

Colleague and successor, Rev. A. D. McLeod, M.A. 

City Road do. Rev. Wm. Loudon 

Maisondieu do. .... Rev. J. M. Hunter, M.A. 

Scotch Episcopal Church, Argyll Street - - - Rev. K. L. Reid 
E.U. Church, Southesk Street - - - Rev. Alexander Mitchell 
Church of the Holy Trinity (R.C.) St. Andrew 

Street Visiting Priest 

Brechin Agricultural and Trading Company, Limited 

Directors — James Guthrie, D. G. Shiell, John Lamb, Alexr. Philip, 
and J. B. McNab ; Secretary, T. M. Guthrie ; Manager, Alexander Gray ; 
Traveller, Arthur Jarron ; Cashier, J. A. Udle. 

Co-Operative Societies 

* United Co-Operative Society, Limited — President, A. O'Neil ; Secretary, 
Geo. Fyfe ; Cashier, Jas. Forrest ; Manager, Frederick McLeod. Office 
— 73 High Street. Grocery Branches — 29 River Street, 65 Montrose Street, 
1 Witchden Road, South Port, 1 St. David Street, and Southesk Street, 
Shoemaking Department — High Street. Tailoring, Millinery, and Drapery 
Departments — 5 and 7 St David Street and High Street. Bakehouses — 
Montrose Street. Coal Department — Railway Station. 

Independent Labour Party 

President, John Murray; Secretary, Helen Lindsay, 84 Market Street; 
Treasurer, Wm, Dalgetty. 

Red Cross Society 

Vice-President for Brechin District, Provost Ferguson ; District Secre- 
tary, Fred. A. Ferguson, solicitor. Women's Detachment — Commandant, 
Miss M 'Nab, Keithock; Quartermaster, Miss L. S. Duke, Bearehill; Lady 
Superintendent, Miss Netue Lamb, The Latch. 

City Improvements Association 

President, Bailie Henderson ; Vice-President, Ex-Provost Beaton; Secre- 
tary, F. A. Ferguson, solicitor ; Treasurer, D. Jamieson, solicitor. 



46 The Brechin Almanac and Directory for 1914.. 

Scottish Farm Servants' Union 

Brechin. District Branch — Secretary, Win. Matthew, West Ballochy. 

Brechin Unionist Association 

Hon. President, John B. Don of Maulesden ; Hon. Vice-Presidents, 
The Earl of Southesk and the Earl of Dalhousie ; John B. McNab of 
Keithock; Patrick Chalmers, of Aldbar; Captain Scott Erskiue of Balhall ; 
Ex-Provost Scott and Captain Hew Blair-Imrie, Forebank ; Chairman, 
Ex-Bailie Murray ; Vice-Chairmen Provost Ferguson, D. CI. Shiell, Win. 
Johnston, jun., and J. S. Lindsay ; Hon. Secretary and Treasurer, David 
Fleming, solicitor, Union Bank Buildings. 

Mechanics' Institution 

Instituted 1825. President, D. Duke ; Vice-President, Rev. W. W. 
Coats, D.D. ; Treasurer, Andrew Wallace ; Secretary, M. B. Lamb ; 
Keeper and Librarian, Wm. Davis. 

Tickets of Membership — Apprentices and those under 15 years, Is 6d ; 
Artisans, 2s ; all others, 3s per annum — to be had at the Library. 
Library hours — Mondays, 6 p.m. till 9 p.m. ; other days, from 11 a.m. till 
3 p.m. ; and 6 to 9 p.m. ■ 

The Directors have at their disposal yearly, in terms of the settlement 
of the late Mr Andrew Jervise, Three Prizes (value £3, £2 and £1 
respectively) from the revenue of his bequest, for the three be. : it Essays 
written by apprentices in the town or parish of Brechin, on the hi story of 
the profession or trade in which they are themselves personally engaged. 

Primrose League 

Brechin and District Habitation, No, 174-1 — Formed on 15th October 
1889. Secretary, Wm. Anderson ; Treasurer, James S. Lindsay. 

Brechin and District Conservative Association 

Instituted in October 1884. President, the Right Hon. the Earl 
of Kintore ; Secretary, William Anderson, solicitor, Brechin ; Treasurer, 
James S. Lindsay. 

High School Former Pupils' Association 

Instituted 1908. Hon. President, John Lamb, J. P., Glencadam ; Hon. 
Vice-Presidents, Ex-Provost Scott, Rev. A. D. Tait Hutchison, A. R. 
Maclean Murray, David Duke, and Andrew Robertson; President, T. M. 
Guthiie ; Vice-Presidents, D. G. Shiell and Miss Scott, Park House; 
Secretary, F. C. Anderson ; Treasurer, C. Ferrier. 

Women's Liberal Unionist Association 

President, Rt. Hon. The Coiintcss of Southesk ; Vice-Presidents, 
Miss Campbell, Stracathro, and Mrs McNab, Keithock ; Secretary, Mrs 
it. Murray, St. Katherines ; Treasurer, Miss Scott, Park House. 



General Directory. 47 



Curling- Clubs 

Brechin Castle Curling Club — Patrons, Right Hon. Earl of Dalhousie 
and Hon. C. M. Ramsay; Patroness, Countess of Palhousie; President, 
Karl of Dalhousie ; Vice-President, Provost Ferguson ; representative mem- 
bers, Messrs David Duke and D. G. Shiell ; Chaplain, Rev. A. D. Tait 
Hutchison ; Secretary and Treasurer, W. H. Ferguson ; Icemaster, 
D. G. Shiell ; Council, D. Lamb, W. Ferguson, Jani^s Smart, J. B. 
McNab, J. L. Aird, G. Shepherd, H. P. Gordon. Skips— Earl of Dal- 
housie, Hon. C. M. Rainsay, Provost Ferguson, D. Wingate, J. Duncan, 
Rev. A. D. T. Hutchison, D. G. Shiell, D. Duke, and Ii. P. Gordon. 

Southesk Curling Ctub — President, Jas. Carnegie ; Vice-President, Capt. 
Blair-Imrie ; Secretary and Treasurer, C. M. Denholm. 

Brechin and District Mercantile Association 

President, James Scott Lindsay ; Vice-President, Ex-Provost Beaton ; 
Secretary and Treasurer, David Fleming, solicitor, Union Bank Buildings. 

Ex-Ploughmen's Association 

President, A. Eaddie ; Vice-President, J. Taylor ; Secretary and 
Treasurer, John Shand. 

Brechin and District Mutual Plate Glass Association- 
President, James Scctt Lindsay ; Secretary and Treasurer, David 
Fleming, solicitor, Union Bank Buildings. 

Liberal Association 

Instituted 1880. President, James Guthrie ; Vice-President, George 
Smart ; Secretary and Treasurer, Chas. Ferrier. 

Women's Liberal Association 

President, Mrs James Bruce ; Vice-Presidents, Mis D. Duke and 
Mrs James Scott; Secretary, Mrs P. W. Watt, 5 Union Street; Joint 
Treasurers, Mrs James Kinnea- and Miss Whyte. 

Ladies' Permanent Coal Fund 

President, Mrs R. W. Duke; Vice-President, Miss N. Lamb; Treasurer, 
Mr T. Maule Guthrie ; Secretary, Miss Anderson ; and a Committee of 
Management. 

Brechin Savings Bank 

Established in 1851. Certified under Act of Parliament, 1863. Office, 
St. Mary Street. Open for the transaction of business on Tuesdays, from 
11 a.m. to 3 p.m., and from 6 to 8 p.m. ; also on Friday evenings, from 6 
to 8. W. Anderson, Actuary ; The British Linen Bank, Brechin, Bankers ; 
David S. Barrie, Auditor. 

East Mill Company, Limited 

Works and Registered Office--East Mill Road. J. & I \ G. Shiell, Solicitors, 
Secretaries. A. Nicol Simpson, Manager. James Scott, Auditor. 



48 The Brechin Almanac and Directory for 1914- 

The Territorial Force 

Brechin Detachment 5th Battalion Black Watch (Royal Highlanders) 
Captain T. M. Guthrie, Commanding Detachment ; Lieutenants, J. Duke 
and A. Duke ; Drill Hall and Armoury, Bank Street ; Drill Instructor, 
Col. -Sergeant Arthur ; Chaplain to the Territorial Force, attached to 5th 
Batt., Rev. Dr Coats. 

Brechin District Boy Scouts 

President, Countess of Dalhousie ; Commissioner, Vacant ; 

Secretary and Treasurer. Rev. A. D. Tait Hutchison ; Scoutmaster, J. S. 
M'Alley ; Assistant Scoutmaster, Jas. Taggart ; Instructor, J Neish. 

Educational Institute of Scotland. 

Brechin Local Association — Meets in Brechin and Montrose alternately 
on third Saturday of February, last Saturday of April, second Saturday of 
June, last Saturday of October, and last Saturday of December. President, 
G. A. Ross, Brechin ; Treasurer, A. C. Robertson Aldbar ; Secretary, 
Wm. Cranston, Montrose. 

Brechin District of County Council. 

Chairman, W. Shaw Adamson, Esq., of Careston ; Joint Clerks and 
Treasurers, Alex. Philip and David Fleming, Union Bank Buildings. 
Collector, H. P. Gordon, Swan Street. 

Post Office 

Office, Clerk Street — J C Robertson, Postmaster. Open from 8 a.m. 
to 8 p.m. Order and Bank Business, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. ; Saturdays, to 
8 p.m. Telegraph Office, open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. ; Sundays, 9 to 
10 a.m. 

Scottish Legal Life Assurance Company 

Brechin District — George Henderson, President ; Alex. M'Gregor, 
Secretary. 

National Federal Union of Operative Bakers of Scotland 

Brechin Branch— President, A. Christie ; Vice-President, D Thomson ; 
Secretary, David Ireland ; Treasurer, William Hutton. 

Shop Assistants' Union 

Chairman, D. Irons ; Secretary, Mary Davidson ; Treasurer, Bella 
Wilson. 

Operative Masons' Union 

Brechin Branch— President, James Smith ; Secretary, John Ogilvie ; 
Treasurer, David Farquhar. 



General Director//, 49, 



Infirmary and Dispensary 

President, The Right Hon. The Earl of Dalhousie ; Vice-President, Rev, 
Dr Coats; Directors — Provost Ferguson, Bailies Henderson and Car gill ; 
Alex. Peter, John Lamb, G. A. Scott, James Guthrie, T. M. Guthrie, 
D. Duke, W. C. Cuniughame, G. Shepherd, J. B. McNab, C. S. 0. Mills, 
Alfred O'Neil, James Bruce, John Joe, M. B. Lamb, and Dr Lnshmau ; 
Secretary and Treasurer, James Scott ; Matron, Miss Milne ; Medical 
Officers, the Medical Practitioners of the City. 

Scottish Go-Operative Women's Guild 

Brechin Branch — President, Mrs Gardner ; Vice-President, Mrs Murray; 
Treasurer ; Mrs John Joe ; Secretary, Miss Katie Fraaer, 

Rechabites 

Brechin Tent, No. 3 — Meets in Rechabite Hall, alternate Friday 
evenings. Alex, Ross, C.R. ; G. Douglas, Secretary ; William Jaffrey, 
Treasurer. 

Mayflower (Juvenile) Tent — Superintendent, J. B. Todd, 

Masonic Lodges 

St. Ninktn's Lodge, No. 66 — Founded in 1740, Meets on the third 
Thursday of each month, at 8. 15p.m. R.W.M., Robert Henderson ; D.M., 
Alexander Dunbar; S.M., George A. Moir : S.W., J.'M. Finlayson ; 
J.W.. Alexander Norrie ; Secretary, D. Taylor ; Treasurer, R. C. Whyte ; 
S.D., D. Smith; J.D., W. Burness ; Director of Music, George A. Moir; 
Steward, Wilson M. Dorward ; I.G., J. S. Mitchell ; O.G., Jas. Alexander. 

St. James' Lodqe, No. 123 — Instituted 1770. Meetings held on the 
second and fourth Thursdays of each month in the Masonic Hall, Church 
Street, at 8.15 p.m. R.W.M., Rev. H. C. Cargill ; D.M., C. S. 0. Mills ; 
S.M., Wm, Johnston, Jr.; S.W., J. F. Lammond. jun.; J. W., J. Cowieson ; 
Secretary, J. S. Kinghorn ; Treasurer, G. Davidson ; Chaplain, The Rev. 
W. W. Coats, D.D. ; S.D., Geo. dimming; J.D., R. Adamson Scott; Clerk, 
A. Boulton ; Director of Music, J. S. Li ml say ; D.C., J. A. Spence ; 
B.B., James Lammond, sen. ; Steward, D. Keir ; I.G., J. Duncan ; O.G., 
A. Paton. 

Royal Arch Chapter Noah, No 7. — Instituted 1774. 1st Prin , 
Robert Oswald ; 2nd Prin., John Christfson ; 3rd Prin., W. C. Wishart ; 
S. E., James Barrie ; 1st Soj., Andrew Gibson ; 2nd Soj., J. Cuthill ; 3rd 
Soj. Alex. Gibson ; D.C., G. 0. Gibson ; Treas., Wm. Eggie ; Janitor, 
Alex. Paton. 

Population of Brechin 

1911 Census— Parish, 9836. Parliamentary Bureh, 8439, Royal 
Burgh, 4816. Brechin Burgh Electorate, 1913-1914— Municipal, 2117. 
Parliamentary Voters— 1326. Burgh Valuation, 1913-1914— £36,551 8s 7d. 
Railways, £1581. Parish Council Voters, 2120. Area of Burgh, 641.429 
acres. 



Smith, Hood, & Co., Ltd. 

COLLIERY AGENTS & COAL MERCHANTS, 

Brechin Officc-MARTIN'S LANE. 



TELEPHONE No. 76. 



Every kind of Finest Coals always in Stock for 
immediate delivery. Waggons at Four Days' Notice. 

Scotch and English 



Scotch Coal. 

Carnock Wallsend. 
Lochgelly, 5 Feet. 
LUMPHINNANS, 5 Feet. 

Bowhill D/S Splint. 
Dunfermline D/S 

Splint. 
Bowhill D/S Hartley. 
Mossbeath D/S do. 



Parlour Coal. 

Hirstrigg, Selected. 
English do. 

Feknigare do. 
Tannochside do. 
Wemyss Jewel. 
Kinneil Caking Coal. 
English Smithy Coal. 



Bannockburn Jumbos. 
Do. Trebles 

Do. Singles. 



Scotch an d English Nuts. 

Hirstrigg Trebles. 
Shieldhill do. 
Chapel do. 



Smok eless Coal. 

We specialise for use in Esse Stoves, Vineries, 
Greenhouses, Hothouses, Peachhouses, etc. 



Polmaise (Anthracite) 

Coal. 
Polmaise (Anthracite) 

Jumbos. 



Polmaise (Anthracite) 

Trebles. 
Polmaise* (Anthracite) 

Singles. 



D. C. KNOWLES, Manager. 



JBb$ell H>irector\>. 



Angling Club. 
Lindsay, W. , President 
Silver, F., Vice-President 

Banks. 
Union Bank-G. P. Mitchell, 

Agent 
Savings Bank — Thomas Bennet, 

Receiver of Deposits 

Bakers. 
Byars, W. & J. 
Belford, Wm. 
Duncan, Miss 

Blacksmiths. 
Duncan, J. 
Hay, W. 

Bootmakers. 
Nairn, D. 
Wilson, Alex. 

Builders. 
Douglas, David 

Butchers. 
Smith, Wm. 
Strachan, J. 

Choral Society 
Ferguson, D., President 
Robertson, D. A., Secretary 
Farquhar, W. J., Conductor 

Goal Merchants and Contractors 
Muir, Son, & Patton, Ltd.— 
D. M'Lareh, Agent 

Curling Club. 
Wilson, J. A., President. 
M'Laren, D., Secy. 
Tliiem, C. A., Treas. 

Chemist. 
Petrie, J. S. 

Cycle Agents. 
Duncan, John L. Reps, of 
Milne, A., & Son 

Dalhousie Bowling Club. 
Smith, A., President 
Silver, J., Vice-President 
Robertson, D. A., Secy. 



Drapers 
Carr, John 
Crabb, Miss 
Ferguson, D. 
Robertson. J. 0. 

Dressmakers. 
Beatti-, Mios, High Street 
Jolly, Miss, Koran Cottage 
McGregor, Miss, Union Street 

Edzell Bowling Club 
Theim, C. A., President 

Edzell String Band. 
Lindsav, W., Conductor 
Silver, F., President 

Edzell Gas Co., Ltd. 
Ferguson, F. A. Secretary 
Crichton, John H., Manager 

Fire- Brigade. 
Fearn. J. L., Captain 



Moir, J. 



Fruiterer. 
&Son 



Golf Clubs.— Edzell Club. 
Dalhousie, The Right Hon. Ear) 

of. Captain 
Shiell, D. G., Secretary 
Mitchell. G. P., Treasurer 

Gannochy Club. 
Robb, G., Captain 
Cameron, S., Secy, and Treas. 

Grocers. 
Carr, John 
Crabb, Miss 
Jack, Alex. 
Mitchell, Mrs 
Robertson, J. 0. 
Thomson, John (Licensed) 

Horse and Motor Hirers. 
Mans^m, W., & Son, Glenesk 

Stables 
Oram, D., Central Stables 

Hotels. 
Glenesk Hotel, MissMacdonald, 
Manageress 



General Directory. 



51 



Hotels — contd. 

Panmure Arms, 0. A. Tliiem, 

Proprietor 
Central Hotel, D. Oram, Propr. 

House Agent. 
Garden, J., High Street 

Inglis Memorial Hall. 
Free Library and Heading Room 
open 10 a.m. to 12 noon, and 
6 to 9 p.m. Thos. Adam, 
Keeper and Librarian 

Joiners. 
Jackson, Wm. 
Fearn, James 

Literary Society 
Belford, W., President 
McLaren Mrs., Secretary 

Masonic Lodge. 

Edzell Castle (870), A. Gibson, 

R.W.M., G. Douglas, Secy, 

Painters. 
Hutcheon, D. & J. 
M.-ithers, J. & Co., 
Ramsay, Alex. 

Plumbers. 
LaiMinond, J., & Son 

Ploughmen's Society. 
Christie, Charles, President 
Douglas, G., Secretary and 
Treasurer 

Parish Council. 
Arnot, D. , Chairman 
Mitchell, G. P., Inspector and 

Clerk 
M'Laren, D. 

Photographers. 
Duncan, John L., Reps, of 
Mathers, R. K. fl., 

Poulterer and Gamedealer. 
Smith, Wm. 

Post Office. 
Mails arrive, 7.45 am., 3 p.m. 

and 6.15 p.m. , 

Despatch, 10.5 a.m., 1.0, 3.20 

p.m. aud5.15 p.m. 8.10 p.m. 



Despatch, Sunday, North 8.45 

a.m. ; South, 1 p.m. 
Open Sundays 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. 

Sale of Stamps and Telegrams; 

for Callers' Letters, 12.30 to 

1.30 p.m. 

Rural Despatches. 
Arnhall, 9.10 „ 
Dalbog, 9.10 „ 
Burn, 9.10 a.m. 
Tarfside, 9 10 a.m. 
Sub-Postmistress, Miss A. 
Mac Rao 

Saddler. 
Clark, Wm, C. 

School Board. 
Sturrock, Kev. T. 0-, Chairman 
Adam, T. , Treasurer and Clerk. 

Shepherds' Friendly Society. 
Adam, T., VV.M. 
Keir, G., Financial Secy 

Special Drainage and Watei 

District Sub-Committee 
Shiell, D. G., Chairman 
Dalhousie, Rt. Hon. The Earl of 
Arnot, D. 
M'Laren, D. 
Cameron, A. V. 
Philip, Alex, Clerk 
Mcintosh, J., Superintendent 

of Works 

Stationery and Fancy Goods. 
Crabb, Miss 
Garden, John 
Guthrie, Geo. 
Kinnear, David 
Mathers' Emporium 

Tailors and Clothiers. 
Beattie, Alex. 
Ferguson, D. 

Temperance Lodge. 
I. O. G. T. Gannochy Lodge, 

Lodge Deputy, Sister M. .). 

Robertson 
Village Improvement Committee. 
Adam, T., Secy. 
McLaren, D., Treas. 



ECLIPSES, RATES OF POSTAGE, &c. 



Principal Articles of the 

Calendar for the Year 1914. 

Golden Number, 15 ; Epact, 

3 ; Solar Cycle, 19 ; Dominical 

Letter, D ; Roman Indiction, 

12 ; Year of Julian Period, 6627. 

Foreign Epochs. 

The year 5675 of the Jewish 

Era begins on September 21, 

IQT4- 

The year 1333 of the Moham- 
medan Era begins on November 
19, 1914. 

Ramadan (Month of Absti- 
nence observed by the Turks) 
commences on July 24, 1914. 
Eclipses in 1914. 
In the year 1914 there will be 
two Eclipses of the Sun and 
two of the Moon, and a Transit 
of Mercury across the Sun's 
disc. 

Feb. 24. — An Annular Eclipse 
of the Sun, invisible at Green- 
wich. 

March 12. — A Partial Eclipse 
of the Moon, visible at Green- 
wich. 

August 21. — A Total Eclipse 
of the Sun, visible as a Partial 
Eclipse at Greenwich. 

Sept. 4. — A Partial Eclipse of 
the Moon, invisible at Green- 
wich. 

Nov. 7. — ATransit of Mercury 
across the Sun's disc, visible at 
Greenwich. 

Law Sittings. 

Begin End 
Hilary Sittings, Jan. 12 Apr. 8 
Easter ,, Apr. 21 May 29 
Trinity ,, June 9 July 31 
Michaelmas,, Oct. 12 Dec. 21 
Telephone Trunk Lines. 
The fees for the use of the 
Telephone Trunk Lines in the 
United Kingdom are : — From 25 
miles or under, 3d. ; 50 miles, 
6d. ; 75 miles, qd. ; 100 miles, 
is. ; for every additional 40 miles 
in part thereof, 6d. Time limit 
of conversation, three minutes. 
Telegrams. 
The charge for Inland Tele- 
grams is 6d. for the first 12 words, 
and id. for every additional word. 
Addresses are charged for. 

Night Telegraph Letters. 

These may be sent under cer- 
tain conditions at the rate of 36 
words for 6d. for delivery by the 
first post next morning. 6d. is the 
minimum charge for this service. 
Parcel Post. 

The rate of postage, to be pre- 
paid in ordinary postage stamps, 
is for an Inland Postal Parcel 
of a weight 



Not exceeding 1 lb. . 3d. 

Excdg. 1 lb. ,not exedg. 2 lb. 4d . 

„ 2 „ „ 3 ■ > 5d. 

,. 3 >i ..5 >, od. 

„ 5 „ ., ? ., 7d. 

„ 7 „ ,, 8 „ Sd. 

>• 8 „ ,, g „ 9d. 

,, 9 ,, ,, 10 ,, iod. 

: <i 10 u >> n i, II( i. 

The dimensions allowed for 
an Inland Postal Parcel are : — 
Greatest length . 3 ft. 6 in. 
Greatest length and 
girth combined . 6 ft. o in. 
A Parcel Post Service has 
been established between the 
United Kingdom and many 
foreign countries and the British 
Colonies and Foreign Posses- 
sions generally. For rates and 
regulations see Post Office 
Guide. 

Letter Post. 

To and from all parts of the 
United Kingdom the prepaid 
rates are : — 
Not exceeding 4 6z. in 

weight .... id. 
For every additional 2 oz. . jd. 

A letter posted unpaid is 
chargeable on delivery with 
double postage ; if insufficiently 
paid, with double the deficiency. 

The Foreign Postage Rate is 
2^d. per oz., and iid. per oz. 
after ; to the United States id. 
per oz. 
Imperial Penny Postage. 

A letter postage of id. per 
oz. is now established between 
the United Kingdom and nearly 
all British Possessions and 
Egypt. 

Registration and Compen- 
sation. 

By the prepayment of a fee 
of twopence, any postal packet 
(parcels included) may be regis- 
tered to any place in the United 
Kingdom. Compensation will 
be given for the loss and damage 
of Inland Registered Postal 
Packets. The ordinary registra- 
tion fee secures ^5 ; 3d., £-zo ; 
4d.,^4o; 5d.,;£6o;6d.,J;8o ; 7d., 
;£ioo; 8d. ,,£120; gd.,^140; iod., 
.£160, and so on up to is. iod. , 
which secures .£400, See Post 
Office Guide. 

Halfpenny Post (Inland). 

This post is limited to packets 
not exceeding 2 oz. in weight, 
and covers books, drawings, 
documents, of which particulars 
are given in the Postal Guide. 

Canada Magazine Post. 

Newspapers, magazines, trade 
journals, etc., which have been 
duly registered, can now be 



transmitted to Canada at the 
rate of one penny per pound 
weight. 

Postage on Inland. 

Registered Newspapers. 

Prepaid Rate. — On each 
registered newspaper, whether 
posted singly or in a packet, the 
postage when prepaid is one 
halfpenny. 

Cash on Delivery Service. 

For a prepaid fee of 2d., with 
another charge on delivery, the 
Post Office will collect charges 
for goods not exceeding ,620. At 
present this service is confined to 
certain British Possessions and 
Egypt. 

Post Cards. 

Thick post cards, bearing a 
half-penny impressed stamp, are 
available for transmission be- 
tween places in the United 
Kingdom only. Thick cards are 
sold in packets at 11 for 6d. ; 
thin at face value. They can 
also be had in smaller numbers 
or singly. Reply-cards are also 
sold. Letter-cards are sold at 
one penny each. Foreign post 
cards, id. ; reply, 2d. 

Money Orders for the 
United Kingdom. 

Money Orders are granted in 
the United Kingdom at the fol- 
lowing rates : — 

For sums not exceeding £1, 
2d. ; above £1 and not exceed- 
ing £2, 3d. ; above ^3 and not 
exceeding ^Jio, 4d. ; .£10 to .£20, 
6d. ; .£20 to ,£30, 8d. ; ,£30 to 
^40, iod. 

Money may be sent by 
Telegraph Money Order at the 
same rate as for ordinary Inland 
Money Orders plus supple- 
mentary fee of 2d. and cost of 
official telegram of advice. 

Postal Orders. 
Forty-one orders are now is- 
sued representing every 6d. from 
6d. to 20s., and also for 21s. The 
charge is id. tor orders from 
6d. to 2s. 6d. ; id. for orders 
from 3s. to 15s., and iid. for 
orders above that sum. 

Post Office Savings Banks. 
No deposit of less than a shil- 
ling is received, nor any pence, 
and not more than ^50 in one 
year. No further deposit is 
allowed when the sum stand- 
ing in depositor's name amounts 
to^2oo, inclusive of interest. In- 
terest is allowed at the rate of 
2J per cent, (or sixpence in the 
pound) per annum — that is, one 
halfpenny per pound per month. 



• 


V)fUtU3l*P Riches arc for spending 






[1914 


THE MOON'S CHANGES. 


Sun 




Moon 




First Quarter, 4th, 1 9 p.m. 1 Last Quarter, 19th, 30 a.m. 
Full Moon, 12th, 5 9 p.m. | New Moon, 26th, 6 34 a.m. 


Rises. 

H. M. 

8 S 


Sets 


Rises. 


Sets. 


H. M. 

3 59 


Morn. 
TO 47 


Aft.-. 

9 23 


I 


Th 


New Yr.'s Day. Bk. Holiday in Scotland: Yea". 


2 


F 


Doyle, caricaturist, died, 1868. 


8 8 


4 1 


IO 


57 


IO 


41 


3 


S 


Douglas Jerrold born, 1803. 3 


8 8 


4 2 


II 


6 


II 


52 


4 


s 


2nd Sunday after Christmas. 


8 8 


4 3 


II 


17 


Morn. 


5 


M 


Dividends on Consols due. 


« 7 


4 4 


11 


28 


1 


I 


6 


Tu 


Epiphany— Twelfth Day. 


8 7 


4 5 


II 


4i 


2 


12 


7 


W 


Old Christmas Day. 


8746 


II 


57 


3 


29 


8 


Th 


Cambridge Lent Term begins. 


S 6| 4 8 


oa2i 


4 


45 


9 


F 


Christmas Fire Insurance ceases. 


8 6; 4 9 





57 


6 


1 


10 
11 


s 


British Penny Postage commenced, 1840. tq 


3 5 
3 5 


4 10 


1 


48 


7 


10 


s 


1st Sunday after Epiphany. 


4 12 


2 


S 8 8 


,5 
4S 


12 


M 


Hilary Law Sittings begin. 


8 4|4i3 


4 


20 


8 


'3 


Tu 


St. Hilary. 


8 3 415 


5 


5i 


9 


12 


14 


VV 


Oxford Lent Term begins. 


8 2 


4 16 


7 


2 1 


9 


32 


is 


Th 


14. Lord Lansdowne born, 1845. 


8 2 


4 18 


8 


48 


9 


47 


16 


F 


Home Rule Bill passed through Commons, 1913. 


S 1 


4 1Q 


10 


J 5 9 


sq 


17 

18 


S 


J3. Franklin born, 1705. -, >- 


8 


4 21 


1 1 


40 10 


II 


s 


2nd Sunday after Epiphany. 


7 59 


4 22 


Morn. 10 


25 


J 9 


M 


18. Capt. Scott reached South Pole, 1912. 


7 58 1 4 24 


1 


6 


IO 


40 


20 


Tu 


Ruskin died, icoo. 


7 57,4 26 


2 


34 


10 


59 


21 


W 


22. Byron born, 17S8. 


7 56 427 


4 


2 


11 


26 ■ 


22 


Th 


Que?n Victoria died, 1901. 


7 55 


4 29 


5 


23 


oa-13 


23 


b 


Charles Kingsley died, 1875. 


7 54 


4 31 


6 


32 





56 


24 


S 


Lord R. Churchill died, 1895. 24 


7 53 


4 32 


7 


23 


2 


5 


25 


S 


3rd Sunday after Epiphany. 


7 5 1 434 


8 





3 


22 


26 


M 


General Gordon died, 1885. 


7 5° 4 3 6 


8 


24 


4 


43 


27 


I'd 


William II., German Emperor born, 1855. 


7 49| 4 3 8 


8 


41 


6 





23 


VV 


Peter the Great died, 1725. 


747:439 


8 


53 


7 


14 


29 


Th 


Duke of Fife died, 1912. 


746 


441 


9 


5 


8 


26 


30 


b 


Ice Fair on Thames, 1814. 


7 44 


4 43 


9 


*3 9 


36 


3 1 


S 


Great Eastern launched, 185S. 3 * 


742 


4 45 


9 


23 1 10 


45 


MORNING AND EVENING STARS. 

Mercury is in superior conjunction with the 
Sun on the 25th. 


SUN'! 


3 RISING AN 


D SETTING. 




DATE. 


| LONDON. 


FA 


INBURGH 


DUBLIN.* 
-I. M. H. M. 








M. V 


. M 


Venus is a morning star, near the Moon on 
the 25th. 


January j 


8 8 359 


8 


48 3 


45 


8 19 


3 45 


Mars is in opposition to the Sun on the 5th, 


I 


8 G 4 8 


8 


44 


54 


8 16 


3 5^ 


near the Moon on the ^th. 


» 1 


| 8 2 I 4 18 


8 


30 4 


7 


8 11 


4 8 


Jupiter is in conjunction with the Sun on the 




7 55 j 4 29 


8 


3° 4 


20 


8 4 


4 20 


20th, near the Moon on the 25th. 












Saturn is an evening star, near the Moon on 




* Dublin t 


nne. 






the 9th. 


Distance of 


the Sun on the 


ist,9 


1,342,000 n 


iles. 



Fact is stranger than fiction. 



A PAGE OF FACTS. 



AN English china teapot has been sold for 
£l,500. 

OIL is to be the fuel for the British Navy Of 
the future. 

SILK made from wood-pulp is now a thriving 
Essex industry. 

THE lightship at Mersey Bar is fitted with a 
light of 40,000 candle-power. 

A POWERFUL motor fire-float is now 
stationed for service on the Thames. 

KING HENRY VII. 's chapel in Westminster 
Abbey is now once more the chapel of the 
Knights of the Bath. 

THE high price of leather has led to the in- 
creased use of substitutes, some of which, 
though not all, wear very well. 

BEFORE many years are past the "overland 
route " to India is likely to be revived by 
through railway communication. 

" OLD ENGLISH GARDENS " have now been 
formed in several of the parks under the con- 
trol of the London County Council. 

SHADWELL Fish Market, which proved a 
commercial failure, is now being laid out as a 
riverside open space for East London. 

LEPROSY, which was once terribly prevalent 
throughout Europe, is not altogether unknown 
in England even to-day, though it is very rare. 

IN Tudor times, Heston, in Middlesex, pro- 
duced such fine wheat that Queen Elizabeth 
insisted on it being used to provide bread for 
the royal table. 

ORCHID-HUNTING in the tropics is an 
adventurous business, but rare specimens fetch 
very remunerative prices when brought to the 
European market. 

THE locks on the Panama Canal, which are 
the biggest in the world, have been described 
by those who saw them in the making as 
" canyons in concrete." 

AS much as ,£l,000 has been paid for a 
pedigree dog, and the high prices which people 
are ready to pay makedog-stealing an attractive 
and often profitable occupation. 

THE famous roof of Westminster Hall has 
been thoroughly examined and repaired at a cost 
of several thousand pounds. The scaffolding 
used for the purpose was almost a work of art. 

THOUGH the Spanish Empire has been 
broken up, its language in modified forms is 
spoken in most parts of Central and South 
America, except in Brazil, which once belonged 
to Portugal. 

THE Eucalyptus or Blue Gum tree, which is 
a native of Australasia, is now to be found all 
over the world, its rapid growth and its extra- 
ordinary power of absorbing moisture through 
its roots making it very useful in making un- 
healthy marshy regions in the tropics inhabit- 
able for a white population. It is said that a 
forest of these trees can be grown in twenty 
years, and it seems to flourish nearly as well in 
temperate as in tropical and sub-tropical climates 



SWEDEN has adopted a system of Old Age 
Pensions. 

SOME areas in the Sudan produce the finest 
cotton in the world. 

20,000 persons in England and Wales had to 
do without a birthday in 1912. 

IN London persons under the age of sixteen 
are not allowed to pawn goods. 

THE cost of living in the United States has 
risen by half in fifteen years. 

MOTOR-BARGES are beginning to be used 
with good results on some of our canals. 

A MOVEMENT is on foot to abolish the 
troublesome odd farthing in drapers' prices. 

PEACE has been preserved between Great 
Britain and the United States for a hundred 
years. 

THE public have had to pay in large measure 
for the big coal and railway strikes of a year 
or two ago. 

DAHLIAS, which were discovered in Mexico 
in 1784, have been cultivated in England for 
just a hundred years. 

THE number of Irish school-children learning 
Irish as well as English has considerably in- 
creased in recent years. 

SINCE 1894 the yield from a penny in the £ 
income tax has grown from nearly two millions 
to nearly three millions sterling. 

LAST May was a record month for sunshine 
in this country, and the previous August would 
be hard to beat for rain and floods. 

ON some railway lines the charge for " plat- 
form-tickets " for persons not desiring to 
travel now yields an appreciable yearly revenue. 

SHEEP-FARMING is being developed in 
South America on both sides of the Straits of 
Magellan at- the expense of the native popu- 
lation. 

IN the Falkland Islands, now a Crc.wn 
Colony, the inhabitants go about stooping 
because of the violence of the winds which arc 
always blowing. 

THE proportion of killed to wounded among 
the Bulgarian casualties during the war with 
Turkey was far higher than that recorded in 
the South African War. 

TWO new capital cities are being laid out in 
the British Empire :— The new city of Delhi in 
India, and Canberra, the federal capital of the 
Australian Commonwealth. 

HYDE PARK CORNER is now the most 
crowded piece of roadway in London, the Man- 
sion House crossing having dropped to the 
fourth place on the list of " danger-spots." 

ORANGES were introduced into Europe from 
China by the Portuguese in 1547, and it is 
asserted that the ancestor of all European 
orange trees is still to be seen in a Lisbon 
garden. Nowadays the season for this fruit 
has been largely extended owing to wide 
sources of supply and improved methods of 
transport. It is a eheap and wholesome fruit. 



jfrijrtlflrU] slow and st eady wins the 


race. 








[1914 


THE MOON'S CHANGES. 


Sun 




Moon 


First Quarter, 3rd, 10 33 a.m. 1 Last Quarter, 17th, 9 23 a.m. 


Rises.'i 


Sets. 


Rises. 


bets. 


Full Moon, 10th, 5 35 p.m. | New Moon, 25th, 02 a.m. 


H. M. 

7 4i 


H. M. 
4 46 


Morn. 

9 34 


Aft. 


I 


s 


4th Sunday after Epiphany. D Y,Lr' 


" 55 


2 


M 


Candlemas. Scotch Quarter Day. 


7 4° 


4 43 


9 


40 


Morn. 


3 


lu 


Marquis of Salisbury born, 1830. 


7 39 


4 5° 


10 


I 


1 10 


4 


VV 


George Herbert died, 1633. 


7 37 


4 52 


10 


20 


2 24 


5 


Th 


Sir Robert Peel born, 1788. 


7 35 


4 54 


10 


49 


3 39 


6 


F 


Sir Henry Irving born, 1838. 


7 33 


4 55 


11 


30 


4 52 


7 


S 


8. Half Quarter Day. 38 


7 3 2 


4 57 


03 


3 T 


5 52 


8 


s 


Septuagesima Sunday. 


7 30 


4 58 


I 


49 


6 40 


9 


M 


Sir Evelyn Wood, V.C., born, 1838. 


7 28 


5 


3 


17 


7 12 


10 


Tu 


Lord Lister died, 1912. 


7 26 


5 2 


i 


49 


7 36 


11 


VV 


Thomas Edison born, 1847. 


7 25 


S 4 


21 


7 5i 


12 


Th 


Revolution in China, 1912. 


7 23 


5 6 


7 


5° 


8 5 


13 


F 


Richard Wagner died, 1883. 


7 21 


5 8 


9 


20 


8 20 


M 


S 


St. Valentine. 45 


7 19 


5 10 


1 


49 


8 33 


15 


S 


Sexagesima Sunday. 


7-17 


5 I2 


Morn. 


8 47 


16 


M 


17. Heine died, 1856. 


7 i.S 


5 13 





J 9 


9 4 


17 


Tu 


H.R.H. Duchess of Albany born, 1861 


7 13 


5 i5 


1 


49 


9 27 


18 


VV 


Martin Luther died, 1546. 


7 i' 


5 x 7 


3 


15 


10 2 


19 


Th 


Mme. Adelina Patti born, 1843. 


7 10 


5 i9 


4 


27 


10 50 


20 


F 


Saragosea, 1S09. 


7 § 


5 21 


5 


23 


11 $4 


21 


S 


Cardinal Newman born, 1801. C2 


7 ^ 


5 23 


6 


2 


1 a8 


22 


s 


Quinquagesima Sunday, 


7 4 


5 25 


6 


28 


2 27 


23 


M 


22. Mexican President Shot, 1913. 


7 2 


5 2 7 


b 


47 


3 44 


24 


Tu 


Shrove Tuesday. St. Matthias. 


6 59 


528 


7 


1 


4 59 


25 


W 


Ash Wednesday. 


6 57 


5 3° 


7 


13 


612 


26 


Th 


Earl of Cromer born, 1S41. 


6 55 


5 3i 


7 


2 3 


7 23 


27 


F 


Paardeberg, igco. 


6 53 


533 


7 


32 


8 33 


28 


S 


Hare-hunting ends. rn 


651 


5 35 


7 


42 


9 4i 



MORNING AND EVENING STARS. 

Mercury is at greatest eastern elongation on 
the 22nd. 

Venus is in superior conjunction with the Sun 
on the nth, near the Moon on the 25th. 

Mars is an evening star, near the Moon on 
the 7th. 

Jupiter is a morning star, near the Moon 
on the 22nd. 

Saturn is an evening star, near the Moon 
on the 5th. 



SUN'S 


RISING AND SETTING. 




DATE. 


LONDON. 


EDINBURGH 


DUBLIN.* 


February 1 


H. M. 
7 41 


H. M. 

44G 


H. M.| H. M. 
8 II j 4 41 


H. M. 

7 50 


H. M. 
4 39 


11 8 


7 30 


4 58 


7 58 4 56 


7 36 


4 52 


n 15 


7 17 


5 12 


7 42 5 12 


7 2: 


5 6 


J Distance of t 


7 4 

*I 

le Su 


5 25 
Dubli 

nont 


7 27 1 5 28 
l time, 
heist, 91,546 


7 8 
,0001 


522 
niles. 









'" ■ 


4lfl3t*rl) Time and tide wait for no man. 






[1914 


THE MOON'S CHANGES. 


Sun 




Moon 


First Quartet, 5th, 5 3 a.m. | Last Quarter, 18th, 7 39 p.m. . 


Rises. 1 Sets 


Rises. 


Sets. 


Full Moon 12th, 4 19 a.m. | New Moon, 26th, 69 p.m. 
















M 


Aft. 
10 54 


I 


s 


1st Sunday in Lent. st. David. D yL?! 


649 


5 3 


7 7 


53 


2 


M 


John Wesley died, 1791. 


647 


53 


3 8 


5 


Morn. 


3 


Tu 


Treaty of San Stefano, 1878. 


6 45 


5 4< 


3 8 


23 


8 


4 


W 


Inauguration Day, U.S.A. 


6 43 


54 


2 8 


48 


1 21 


5 


Th 


Sir A. H. Layard born, 1817. 


6 41 


5 4- 


i 9 


22 


2 32 


6 


F 


Elizabeth Browning born, 1809. 


6 39 


5 4< 


3 IO 


12 


3 38 


7 


s 


Bible Society founded, 1804. f.k 


636 


54 


7 11 


20 


4 31 


8 


s 


2nd Sunday in Lent. 


6 34 


54 


) oa42 


5 9 


9 


M 


William Cobbett born, 1762. 


6 32 


5 5 


1 2 


12 


5 36 


10 


Tu 


King Edward VII. married, 1863. 


6 29 


55 


3 3 


43 


5 55 


11 


W 


Gen. Sir j. Outram died, 1863. 


6 26 


5 5 


^ 5 


14 


6 11 


12 


Th 


£1 notes issued, 1797. 


6 24 


5 5 


7 6 


48 


6 25 


13 


F 


Triple Alliance signed, 1887. 


6 22 


55 


3 8 


20 


6 36 


14 


S 


15. Close Time for Fresh Water Fish begins, n <j 


6 20 


6 


^ 9 


53 


6 51 


*5 


s 


3rd Sunday in Lent. 


617 


6 


2 II 


27 


7 8 


16 


M 


P. & O. Oceana sunk, 1912. 


61.S 


6 , 


\ Morn. 


7 29 


*7 


Tu 


St. Patrick's Day. Bank Holiday in Ireland. 


6 13 


6 ( 


3 


5» 


8 


18 


W 


King George of Greece assassinated, 1913. 


6 10 


6 


7 2 


n 


8 45 


19 


Th 


Livingstone born, 1813. 


6 8 


6 


* 3 


20 


9 46 


20 


V 


19. W. J. Bryan born, i860. 


6 7 


6 1 


^ 4 


5 


10 58 


21 


S 


Spring commences. $0 


6 5 


61 


2 4 


35 


oai4 
1 33 


22 


s 


4th Sunday in Lent. 


6 2 


6 1 


3 4 


57 


2 3 


M 


Lord Milner born, 1854. 


6 


6 1 


5 5 


10 


2 49 


24 


Tu 


H.M.S. Eurydice foundered, 1878. 


5 57 


6 1 


7 5 


23 


4 1 


25 


W 


Lady Day. Quarter Day. Ld. Wolseley d., 1913. 


5 55 


6 1 


* 5 


34 


5 10 


26 


Th 


Fall of Adrianople, 1913. 


5 53 


6 2 


^ 5 


41 


6 22 


27 


V 


Cambridge Lent Term ends. 


5 5' 


6 2 


2 5 


51 


7 3° 


28 
29 


S 


27. John Bright died, 1889. ft'j 


5-4« 


6 2 


3 6 


1 


8.41 
9 54 


s 


5th Sunday in Lent. 


5 46 


6 2 


5 6 


14 


3° 


M 


29. Capt. Scott and party died in Antarctic, 1912. 


5 44 


6 2 


7 6 


29 


11 9 


3i 


Tu | Slave Trade abolished, 1806. qo 


5 42 


62 


s 6 


5 1 


Morn. 


MORNING AND EVENING STARS. 
Mercury is in inferior conjunction with the 


SUN'S RISING / 


\ND SET! 


ING. 




EDINBUKGH 


DUBl IN.» 


Sun on the toth. 

Venus is an evening star, near the Moon on 




H. M. H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. H.M. 




the 27th. 


March 1 6 49 5 37 


7 9 


5 43 


6 52 j 5 35 


Mars is an evening star, near the Moon on 


8 6 34 5 4') 


6 52 


5 58 


6 35 5 48 


Jupiter is a morning star, near the Moon on 


n 15 6 17 6 2 


6 33 


6 12 


6 18 ; 6 I 


the 22nd. 


,, 22 6 2 611 


6n 


62b 


6 1 | 6 14 


Saturn is an evening star, near the Moon on 


* Dubli 


n time 






tbA 5ih. 


Distance of the Sun on t 


le 1st, 92,07c 


,000 miles. 


. , . . : , 






... 



Two of a trade seldom agree. 



CANALS AND HOLIDAY=MAKINQ. 



JPHE many-sided problem presented by the 
■*■ long neglect of our canal system has hitherto 
received from the nation as a whole far less 
attention than its undoubted importance 
deserves. But though much might be said on 
the probable advantages to the agricultural 
interests of this country, of the revival of canals 
upon a generous and comprehensive scale, 
it may be pointed out that in the event 
of any considerable attempt to equip canals for 
effective competition with the railways, the 
holiday-maker who loves quiet country life and 
desires to get away from the track of the touri.it 
and the almost ubiquitous week-ender, will find 
one more opportunity of quiet communing with 
Nature taken from him. 

Bankside'Rambling. 

For all those whol have had the chance of 
walking along the banks of any one of our 
neglected canals, on which traffic is with difficulty 
retained under present 
conditions, agree in stat- 
ing that no pleasanter 
way of spending a sum- 
mer holiday in England 
can be found. The 
weeds, which are a sure 
sign of scanty traffic, 
are also interesting to 
the botanist ; and the 
same may be said for 
the untrimmed hedges 
which in many places 
encroach upon the tow- 
path so far as to leave 
little more than room 
for the slow-moving 
horse to pass; indeed, 
it often seems as if the 
patient animal, by crop- 
ping the grass or taking .1 mouthful of juicy 
leaves as he plods his way along, represents all that 
is done to keep the track open. 

Coming: Changes. 

But if once more capital is available to back 
up the efforts of the engineer, there will soon 
be few chances of idling away a week in sum- 
mer in the delightful fashion which has been 
suggested. The canal will be widened and 
deepened, and the mud and weeds must be 
cleared, to the annoyance of the fat fish that 
now live lazy lives in the dark, cool shallows. 
The tow-paths must also be made wide and 
solid, especially if motor traction from the bank 
is adopted, as has been the case in some in- 
stances abroad. 

Awakening the Countryside. 

The sleepy villages, which now seem to have 
changed but little since the days of pack-horses, 
will once more begin to bestir themselves in 
response to the re-awakened energy visible on 
the canal, which has been the symbol of their 
long torpor. The farmer will have the chance 
of sending much of his produce to the big towns 
by motor barge instead of by train at heavy 



rates, and all along the water route new in- 
dustries will spring up, Winging back prosperity 
to places which have long since given up all 
hope of ever taking more than an unselfish 
interest in the affairs of the big, bustling world 
that has ebbed away from them and left them to 
their own small concerns. 

Such changes as these, which are inevitable 
whenever a canal is taken in hand by capable 
and wealthy management, must spoil the quiet 
charm which is now so delightful a characteristic 
of many miles of our inland waterways. The 
lover of Nature may therefore be recommended 
to avail himself of the opportunities provided for 
him by the unprofitable working under disad- 
vantages of these lonely paths and stretches of 
bird-haunted water before it is too late. For when 
the "navigator" once more gets to work with 
pick and shovel wild Nature will retire to a safe 
distance, leaving behind only such hardy fighters 
as flourish in spite of all the efforts of civilised 
man to turn the earth 
from which he sprang 
to his own uses. 



$ 



$ 



The Deserted Village. 

/// /ares the land, to hastening' ills a 
prey. 

Where wealth accumulates , and men 
decay : 

Princes and lards may flourish, or 
may Jade — 

A breath can make them, as a breath 
has made : 

But a bold peasantry, their country's 
pride, 

When once destroyed can never be sup- 
plied. Oliver Goldsmith. 



A Beautiful 
Waterway. 

The canal running 
from the Thames at 
Weybridge by way of 
Aldershot to Basing- 
stoke is deservedly 
known as one of the 
most attractive of these 
half-forgotten under- 
takings which were 
started with such high 
hopes by their pro- 
moters ; and it is as 
pleasant a sauntering- 
place as the idlest man 
in all the world could desire on a day in mid- 
June or any of the warm summer months. 
Boating people, too, sometimes stray in its 
direction, and, provided with the necessary per- 
mit, may spend an enjoyable day or two in 
exploring its surprising bends throughout its 
forty miles of length. But it is not alone in the 
attractions which it offers, for it is typical of 
many other beautiful properties in England 
which may be visited at small expense by those 
who are in love with the peaceful scenery of the 
green and pleasant land in which we live. Even 
on the main canal routes, where traffic is still 
frequent, there is much that is worth seeing, 
and, though for obvious reasons access to 
these tow-paths is not made too easy, boating 
men can usually obtain passes at reasonable 
rates. 

Enough has now been said to show that the 
enforced neglect into which so many of our 
canals have fallen has been Nature's opportunity 
of reasserting her rights, and those who care to 
study her methods (often within a few yards of a 
railway line) can do so to advantage by spending 
rewardful hours either on or by sweet, peaceful 
waters, tree-shadowed, sun-kissed, or wind- 
swept, as chance will have it. 



$jprif] Out cf sight, 


out of mind. 




[1914 


THE MOON'S CHANGES. 


Sun 


Moon 


First Quarter, 3rd, 7 42 p.m. 1 Last Quarter, 17th, 7 52 a.m. 


Rrses. 






Sets. 


Full Moon, 10th, 1 28 p.m. | New Moon, 25th, 


11 22 a.m. 








H. M. 


H. M. 


Morn. 


Morn. 








I 


W \ All Fools' Day. 


Day of 
Year. 


5 39 


6 30 


7 22 


O 22 


2 


Th 


Richard Cobden died, 1S65. 




5 37 


6 32 


8 4 


I 28 


3 


F 


4. Oxford Lent Term ends. 




5 35 


6.34 


9 4 


2 24 


4 


s 


5. Dividends on Consols due. 


94 


5 32 


6 35 


10 18 


3 6 


5 


s 


Palm Sunday. 




5 30 


636 


11 42 


3 37 


6 


M 


Coal Strike ended, igi2. 




528 


638 


ian 


3 58 


7 


Tu Old Lady Day. 




5 25 


6 39 


2 39 


4 14 


8 


'» j Hilaiy Law Sittings end. 




5 23 


6 41 


4 9 


4 29 


9 


J- H j Fire Insurance ceases. 




521 


6 43 


5 4° 


4 43 


10 


F 


Good Friday. 




5 19 


6 45 


7 15 


4 55 


11 


b 


Easter Eve. 


IOI 


5 i7 


646 


a 51 


5 10 


12 


s • 


Easter Day. - . 




5 15 


648 


10 27 


5 29 


i.S 


M 


Easter Monday. Bank Holiday. 




5 I 2 


650 


11 55 


5 57 


14 


Tu 


15. Cardinal Vaughan born, 1832. 




5 10 


652 


Morn. 


6 37 


15 


W 


Oxford Easter Term begins. 




5 a 


6 53 


1 9 


7 33 


16 


Th 


15. Sinking of the Titanic, 1912. 




5 6 


6 55 


2 1 


8 43 


17 


J?' 


18. San Francisco Earthquake, 190C 




5 4 


6 57 


2 37 


10 1 


18 


S 


Cambridge Easter Term begins. 


108 


5 2 


658 


3 1 


11 20 


IQ 


s 


Low Sunday. 




5 


7 


3 18 


0338 


20 


M 


21. Mark Twain died, 1010. 




4 5$ 


7 1 


3 3i 


1 5i 


21 


Tu 


Easter Law Sittings begin. 




4 5b 


7 3 


3 42 


3 1 


22 


W 


Henry Fielding born, 1707. 




4 54 


7 5 


3 5i 


4 11 


23 


Th 


St. George's Day. 




45i 


7 6 


4 


5 20 


24 


F 


Defoe oied, I73r. 




4 49 


7 7 


4 10 


6 30 


2 5 


S 


St. Ma,k. 


US 


448 


7 9 


4 22 


7 43 


26 


s 


2nd Sunday after Easter. 


446 


7 11 


4 37 


8 57 


27 


M 


Emerson died, 1882. 




4 44 


7 13 


4 57 


10 11 


28 


Tu 


Mutiny of the Bounty, 1789. 




442 


7 15 


5 25 


11 20 


29 


W 


30. Fontenoy, 1745. 




4 39 


7 16 


6 3 


Morn. 


3° 


Th 


Lord Avebury born, 1834. 


T20 


437 


718 


6 58 


19 


MORNING AND EVENING STARS. 
Mercury is at greatest western elongation on 


SUN'S RISING Ar 


>1D SETT 


ING. 


DATE. 


j LONDON. 


F,I 


51NBURGH; 


DUBLIN.* 


the 7th. 
Venus is an evening star, near the Moon on 














i H. M. H. M. 


H 


. M. 


H. M.l 


H. M. 


H.M. 


the 27th. 


April 1 


5 39 6 30 


5 


48 


6 48 | 


5 37 


6 32 


Mars is an evening star, near the Moon on the 


8 


5 23 6 41 


5 


30 


7 2 


5 20 


45 


Jupiter is a morning star, near the Moon on 


15 


5 8 6 53 


5 


13 


7 16 


5 4 


6 57 


the 19th. 


>i 22 


4 34 7 5 


4 


55 


7 30 1 


4 49 


7 10 


Saturn is an evening star, near the Moon on 


* Dublin 


ime. 




the 1st and 28th. 


Distance of the Sun on the 


1st, 92,858 


000 miles. 



, ,r » i r- -. n,.-. , -. 


■~ - . 




" ~ 


" ■ ■■ 


2Tl3P Handsome is a. 


handsome does. 




[1914 


THE MOON'S CHANGES. 

First Quarter, 3rd, 6 29 a.m. ] Last Quarter. 16th, 10 12 p.m. 
Full Moon, 9th, 9 31 p.m. | New Moon, 25th, 2 35 a.m. 


St 
^ises. 


JN 

Sets 


Mc 
Rises. 


ON 

Sets. 




— 


H. M. 


H. M 


Morn. 


Morn. 


I 


F 


St. Philip and St. James. 


Year. 


4 35 


7 2< 


3 8 6 


I 


4 


2 


S 


Duke of Connaught born, 1850. 


122 


4 33 


7 2 


2 9 24 


I 


37 


3 


s 


3rd Sunday after Easter. 


432 


7 2 


4 10 48 


2 


1 


4 M 


Bank Holiday in Scotland. 




4 3° 


7 2 


5 oai4 


2 


20 


5 Tu 


4. David Livingstone died, 1873. 




4 28 


7 2 


7 1 4° 


2 


34 


61 W King's Accession. 




4 26 


72 


S 3 8 


2 


47 


7 Trl Lord Rosebery born, 1847. 




4 2 4 


7 2 


9 4 38 


2 


59 


8 F ' J J. S. Mill died, 1873. 




423 


7 3 


o 611 


3 


13 


91 S 


Half Quarter Day. 


129 


4 21 


7 3 


1 7 47 


3 
3 


31 

55 


10 S 


4th Sunday after Easter. 


4 20 


73 


3 9 23 


ill M 


Indian Mutiny began, 1857. 




4 18 


7 3 


5 10 44 


4 


28 


12; Tu 

13 w 


Passage of the Douro, 1S09. 
Sir A. Sullivan born, 1842. 




4 16 
4 14 


7 3 
73 


7 11 49 
9 Morn. 


5 
6 


18 
24 


14! TH Old May Day. 




4 13 


74 


34 


7 


4 2 


IC| F | Edmund Kean died, 1S33. 




4 11 


74 


1 1 3 


9 


4 


l6 


S 1 Albuera, 1811. 


I36 


4 10 


74 


3 ! 2 2 


10 


23 


17 
i 18 


S j Rogation Sunday. 

M N. Hawthorne died, 1864. 




4 8 

4 7 


74 

74 


5 1 3 6 

6 1 50 


11 39 
oaso 


i 9 \ Tu 


W. E. Gladstone died, 1898. 




4 6 


74 


7 J 59 


2 


1 


20 W 


19. Tsar of Russia born, 1868. 




4 4 


74 


828 


3 


10 


21 TH 


Ascension Day. Holy Thursday. 




4 3 


75 


2 18 


4 


19 


22! F 


Sir A. Conan Doyle born, 1859. 




4 2 


75 


1 2 30 


5 


3° 


2 3 


S 


Ramillies, 1706. 


T 43 


4 1 


75 


2 2 44 


6 45 

8 

9 11 

10 14 

11 3 
11 39 

Morn. 


24 

25 
26 

; 27 

1 28 

29 


s 

M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

F 


Sunday after Ascension 

Emerson born, 1803. 
Queen Mary born, 1867. 
Habeas Corpus Act, 1679. 
29. Oxford Easter Term ends. 
Easter Law Sittings end. 




4 
3 59 
3 58 
3 56 
3 55 
3 54 


75 

75 

75 

75 

8 

8 


4 3 1 
6 3 26 

8 4 3 

9 4 53 

5 59 

1 7 i5 


3°, s 


Oxford Trinity Term begins. 


I50 


353 


8 


2 8 36 








31! B 


Whit Sunday. 


I5 1 


3 5 2 


8 


3 10 





25 


MORNING AND EVENING STARS. 

Mercury is in superior conjunction with 
the Sun on the 17th. 

Venus is an evening star, near the Moon on 


SUN'S RISING A 


ND SETT 


ING. 

DUBLIN.* 
H. M.Ih.M. 

4 29 7 26 


DATE. 


LONDON. 


EDINBURGH 


May 1 .. 


H. M.JH. M. 

4 35 7 20 


H. M 
4 33 


H. M. 

7 47 


the 27th. 

Mars is an evening star, near the Moon on 
the 2nd and 30th. 

Jupiter is a morning star, near the Moon on 
the [6th. 
Saturn is an evening star, near the Moon on 
1 the 30th. 
\\ 1 , 


., 8 .. 

„ 15 •• 

Distance of 


! 4 23 ' 7 3i 

4" 741 

4 2 7 5i 

* Dublir 

the Sun on t 


4 20 
4 5 
3 53 
time 
le 1st 


8 1 
815 

827! 

93,628 


4 i5 ; 7 39 
4 3 j 7 5° 

3 52 i 8 1 

,000 miles. i 
rJ 



There never was a good war or a bad peace. 



A CENTURY OF PEACE. 



£|N Christmas Eve, 1814, in the old Carthusian 
" Convent in the good city of Ghent, was 
signed a treaty of peace between Great Britain 
and her daughter colonies known as the free 
and independent republic of the United States. 
From that day to this the peace thus solemnly 
ratified has remained unbroken, and on Christ- 
mas Eve this year the friends of peace all over 
the world will begin to celebrate the hundredth 
anniversary of the treaty in worthy fashion. 
In Canada, as well as in this country and the 
United States, the recognition that war be- 
tween the English-speaking peoples is " un- 
thinkable " will take many forms. Here in 
Great Britain the celebration will include, in 
addition to banquets and speeches galore, the 
erection of an imposing Peace Memorial in 
Westminster Abbey, which is regarded by 
Americans, as by ourselves, wiih veneration as 
the focus of so much that is sacred in our com- 
mon history : the purchase and endowment in 
perpetuity of Sulgrave Manor, in Northampton- 
shire, the ancestral home of the Washington 
family ; and, most important of all, the 
founding of alchair of Anglo-American history, 
to be held by eminent professors at various 
universities in turn, with the object of teaching 
the real facts of the mutually disastrous 
struggle which, though nominally ended by the 
Treaty of Ghent, dragged on, owing to ignor- 
ance of the circumstance that peace had been 
signed, until the early months of 1815. 

A New History Book Wanted. 

That there is need for giving to the coming 
generation of school children on both sides of 
the Atlantic an accurate and unbiassed know- 
ledge of the whole period between the begin- 
nings of the War of Independence to the final 
coriclusion of peace at the end of 1814 is 
sufficiently obvious. In our schools the subject 
is either ignored altogether or dismissed in 
very summary and unsatisfactory fashion, while 
in the United States much unfriendly feeling 
for this country has been fostered in the past 
by the teaching of very distorted views of what 
actually happened, and of the causes and pro- 
gress of the long dispute. Accordingly a joint 
committer of British and American scholars, 
headed by Mr. Bryce, our late Ambassador at 
Washington, and a recognised authority en 
American history, is to endeavour to adjust 
the conflicting opinions of both sides in the 
form of a critical narrative which, it is hoped, 
will become the text-book on the subject. 
The conflict has been endtd for so long that it 
is high time to abandon the teaching of violent 
and partisan views, and to substitute in their 
place a sane and fairminded version of the 
whole matter. 

The War of 1812-14. 

Everyone remembers the throwing into 
Boston Harbour of the tea chests as a protest 
against taxation, and the rebellion which 
ended in the famous Declaration of Indepen- 



dence, but the struggle which took place in the 
early years of last century along the Canadian 
frontier on the great Lakes and along the 
eastern coast with varying fortune is less 
generally known by English people. In 1807 
Great Britain replied to Bonaparte's attempt to 
close all the harbours under his influence to 
British trade, by Orders in Council declaring 
all these ports to be in a state of blockade, and 
all neutral vessels liable to seizure if they at- 
tempted to run the blockade without having 
first touched at a British port. Bonaparte re- 
torted in similar fashion, and the net result 
was to injure his power. We held command 
of the sea, and on the Continent prices rose 
rapidly, so that the populations conquered by 
Napoleon began to realise that they were 
suffering very considerably by the continuance 
of the struggle. The United States, too. were 
aggrieved as a neutral nation by our Orders in 
Council, and after.several years of diplomatic 
unrest war broke out in 1812. By this time the 
obnoxious Orders had been repealed, but feeling 
was so embittered that a struggle could not be 
averted. Many Americans protested against 
the action of President Madi§on in declaring 
war. but they were outvoted in Congress, and 
an attempt was made to indue? Canada to join 
the United States. Owing to our struggle with 
Napoleon we regarded the American war as 
merely "a little episode," and mismanagement 
added to our difficulties. In the end Canada 
was saved for the Empire, and though at sea 
the Americans gained many successes, neither 
side had much to boast of when peace negotia- 
tions were commenced in the autumn of 1814. 

The Victories of Peace. 

The story of the last hundred years is on the 
whole encouraging to those who look forward 
to the final abolition of war as a clumsy and 
evil way of adjusting international disputes. 
At any rate, the solid fact remains that though 
there have been from time to time many points 
of acute difference of opinion between Great 
Britain and the United States, peace has been 
unbroken for three generations. The great 
Civil War between North and South in the 
United States was indirectly the cause of dan- 
gerous friction, for here in England a large 
body o.f public opinion supported the cause of 
the slave-owning states of the South against 
the Prohibitionists of the North. The trouble 
over the Alabama was fortunately settled 
without recourse to arms, thanks to moderate 
counsels on both sides, and other questions, 
such as those connected with the cod and seal 
fisheries, have also been amicably adjusted. 
Perhaps the success of peaceful arbitration has 
been shown even more strikingly in the history 
of the relations between the United States and 
Canada. Here we have two great peoples living 
side by side, and divided only by an artificial 
land frontier which stretches for thousands of 
miles, and is undefended by a single fort. 

" Peace for a hundred years, why not for 
ever? " is what people are asking. 



Stone] 


Good is best when soonest wrought. 








ri9H 


THE MOON'S CHANGES. 


Sun 




Moon 


First Quarter, ist, 2 3 p.m. 1 Last Quarter, 15th, 2 20 p.m. 




Sets. 






Full Moon, 8th. ■; 18 a..m. 1 New Moon, 23rd, 3 33 P.m. 














First Quarter, 30th, 7 25 p.m. 


H. M. 
351 


H. M. 

8 4 


Morn. 
II 23 


Morn. 


I 


M 


Whit Monday. Bank Holiday. u ^l° t l 


O 40 


2 


Tu 


Whit Tuesday. 


3 5° 


8 5 


oa 4 7 


53 


3 


W 


The King's birthday. 


3 50 


8 6 


2 


13 


1 6 


4 


Th 


Lord Wolseley born,. 1833. 


3 49 


8 7 


3 


41 


1 18 


5 


F 


Adam Smith born, 1723. 


3 48 


8 8 


5 


14 


1 33 


6 


S 


Cavour died, 1861. 157 


3 47 


8 9 


6 


48 


1 53 


7 


s 


Trinity Sunday. 


3 47 


8 10 


8 


17 


3 21 


8 


M 


Sir John Millais born, 1829. 


3 46 


8 11 


9 


32 


3 3 


9 


Tu 


Trinity Law Sittings begin. 


3 46 


8 12 


10 


2.5 


4 1 


10 


W 


Crystal Palace opened, 1854. 


3 45 


813 


11 


I 


5 16 


11 


Th 


Corpus Christi 


3 45 


813 


11 


26 


6 39 


12 


F 


11. St. Barnabas. 


3 45 


8 14 


11 


42 


8 2 


13 


S 


Naseby, 1645. 1 64 


3 45 


8i5 


11 


54 


9 22 


14 


s 


1st Sunday after Trinity. 


3 44 


8 16 


Morn. 


10 35 


15 


M 


Close Season for Freshwater Fish ends. 


3 44 


8 16 





7 


11 46 


16 


Tu 


Quatre Bras, 1815 


3 44 


8 17 





17 


oas6 


17 


VV 


Bunker's Hill, 1775. 


3 44 


8 17 





26 


2 6 


18 


Th 


Waterloo Day, 1815. 


3 44 


818 





37 


3 18 


19 


F 


Alabama sunk, 1864. 


3 44 


8 18 





5° 


4 3° 


20 


S 


Accession of Queen Victoria, 1837. 1 7 1 


3 44 


8 18 


1 


5 


5 45 


21 


s 


2nd Sunday after Trinity. 


3 44 


8 18 


1 


29 


6 58 


22 


M 


Summer commences. 


3 44 


8 19 


2 





« 5 


23 


Tu 


H.R.H. Prince of Wales born, 1894. 


3 45 


8 19 


2 


47 


8 59 


24 


W 


Midsummer Day. Quarter Day. 


3 45 


8 19 


3 


47 


9 4i 


2S 


Th 


24. Cambridge Easter Term ends. 


3 45 


8 19 


5 


2 


10 10 


26 


F 


Lord Kelvin born, 1824. 


3 45 


8 19 


6 


25 


10 30 


27 


S 


28. Cawnpore, 1837- 1 78 


3 46 


8 19 


7 


48 


10 46 


28 


s 


3rd Sunday after Trinity. 


3 46 


8 19 


9 


12 


11 


291 M 


St. Peter. 


3 47 


8 18 


10 


35 


11 12 


3° 


|Tu 


Tower Bridge opened, 1894. 1 8 1 


3 47 


818 





a 1 


11 25 



MORNING AND EVENING STARS. 

Mercury is at greatest eastern elongation on 
the 19th. « 

Venus is an evening star, near the Moon on 
the 26th 

Mars is an evening star, near the Moon on 
the 28th. 

Jupiter is a morning star, near the Moon 
on the 13th. 

Saturn is in conjunction with the Sun on the 
13th, near the Moon on the 23rd. 



SUN'S RISING AND SETTING. 



DATE. 



LONDON. 



June 



H. M. H. M.'H. M. H..M. 

3 38 8 43 I 3 42 8 14 
3 33 8 51 1 3 37 8 21 
15 ... ! 3 44 J 8 16 330 8 57 J 3 34 826 
,, 22 ... I 3 44 I 8 19 ! 3 29 ! 9 o : 3 34 8 30 
* Dublin time. 
Distance of the Sun on the ist, 94,218,000 miles. 



H. M. H. M. 

3 51 j 8 4 
3 46 8 11 
3 44 j 8 16 



EDINBURGH 



DUBLIN.' 





VlttlPl Children and fools 


speak true. j 1 Q 1 A 


THE MOON'S CHANOES. 


Sun. Moon 


Full Moon, 7th, 2 p.m. 1 New Moon, 23rd, 2 3S 
Last Quarter, 15th, 732 a.m. | First Quarter, 29th, n 


a.m. 
51 p.m. 


Rises. 


Sets, i Rises. 


Sets. 


1 


w 


Dominion Day. 


Day oi 


3 48 


8 18 I 2^ 


11 39 


2 


'1'H 


Union with Ireland, 1800. 




3 49 


8 i8| 2 52 


II 56 


3 


1' 


Sadowa, 1865. 




3 49 


8 18 4 23 


Morn. 


4 


s 


5. Dividends on Contois due. 


l8S 


3 5o 


I 


5 *7j 5 53 


20 


5 


S 


4th Sunday after Trinity. 




3 5* 


> 17I 7 12 


55 


6 


M 


Sir G. White, V.C., born, 1835. 




3Si 


8 16 8 14' 


1 45 


7 


Tu 


Sheridan died, 1816. 




3 52 


8 16 


8 57 


2 52 


8 


W 


Mr. Chamberlain born, 1836. 




3 53 


3i5 


9 26 


4 12 


9 


Th 


Fire Insurance ceases. 




3 54 


8 15I 9 46 


5 3 6 


10 


h 


Captain Marryat, novelist, born, 1792. 




3 55 


8 14 10 2 


6 58 


11 


S 


Oxford Trinity Term ends. 


IQ2 


3 56 


8 13 10 12 


,_8_i5_ 
9 30 


12 


s 


5 th Sunday after Trinity. 




3 57 


1 

8 12 10 22 


*3 


M 


Voting by ballot, 1872. 




3 58 


8 iij 10 32 


10 41 


M 


Tu 


Bastille stormed, 1789. 




4 


8 11 10 43 


u 50 


!,S 


VV 


St. Szvit hin's. (Nat. Ins. Act into force, 


[912.) 


4 1 


8 io| 10 54 


1 a 1 


16 


Th 


Sir Joshua Reynolds born, 1723. 




4' 3 


8 9 11 9 


2 14 


17 


F 


Dr. Isaac Watts born, 1674. 




4 4 


8 8! 11 29 


3 2 7 


18 
19 


S 


Jane Austen died, 1817. 


199 


4 5 


8 7 


ii- 56 


4 41 


s 


6 th Sunday after Trinity. 




4 6 


8 6 


Morn. 


5 5 1 


20 


M 


Army Purchase abolished, 1S71. 




4 7 


8 A 


37 


6 5i 


21 


Tu 


Sir John Gilbert, painter, born, 1817. 




4 8 


8 3 


1 32 


7 38 


22 


W 


St. Mary Magdalene. 




4 10 


8 2 


2 43 


8 12 


2.3 


Th 


Coventry Patmore born, 1823. 




4 11 8 oj 4 5 


8 35 


24 
25 

26 


F 

S 

s 


Window Tax abolished, 1851. 
Mr Balfour born, 1848. 


206 


4127 59 
4 Mj 7 58 


5 31 

6 57 


8 54 

9 8 


7tb Sunday after Trinity. 




4 15 7 56 


8 22 


9 20 


27 
28 


M 
Tu 


26. Irish Church disestablished, 1869. 
The Alabama left the Mersey, 1S62. 




4 16 

4 18 


7 55 
7 S4 


9 48 
11 12 


9 S 2 
9 46 


2Q 


W 


Lord Haldane born, 1856. 




4 19 


7 S2 


oa4o 


10 2 


SO 


Th 


31. Close time for wild birds ends. 




4 21 


7 Si 


2 9 


10 24 


31 


F 


Trinity Law Sittings end. 


212 


4 22 


7 5° 


3 38 


10 52 


MORN 

Mercuri 

Sun on the 


NG AND EVENING STARS. 

1 is in inferior conjunction with the 
16th. 
an evening star, near the Moon on 

in evening star, near the Moon on 

a morning star, near the Moon on 

a morning star, near the Moon on 


SUN'S 

DATE. ] 


RISING AND SET 

.ONDON, 'EDINBURGH 


TING. 

DUBLIN.* 


V 

the 

M 

the 

/« 

1 the 

S 

1 the 


enus is 
26th. 
ars is 
26th. 
ipitcr \i 
10th. 
iturn is 
20th. 


H 

July 1 3 
„ 8 3 
„ 15 4 
.. 22 4 

Distance of 


. M.'H. M. 

48 i 8 18 
53 ,8 15 
1 8 10 
10 8 2 
♦ Dt 
he Sun or 


H. M 
3 34 
3 4° 
3 49 

3 59 
blin 
the 


. H. M. 

8 59 

8 53' 
8 47 

18 38 
time, 
st, 94,4 


H. M. H. M- 

3 37 ; 8 29 

3 44 i 8 25 

3 52 8 19 

4 , 8 10 

49,000 miles. 



fhter is a good medicine. 



A PAGE OF FUN. 



TlEETING a child sobbing. " I've lost a 
J"^- penny," a benevolent old gentleman 
promptly produced another to stem the tide of 
grief. " Oh, you wicked old man, so you had 
it all the time ! " was all he got in thanks. 

THIS story is told of an old Scotch lady who 
could not tolerate long sermons. One Sunday, 
when the sermon had dragged on without 
showing any signs of termination, she got up 
and left the church. In the porch she met a 
coachman who was waiting for his " people." 
" Is the meenister dune ? " he asked. " Dune ! " 
exclaimed the old lady, "he was dune lang 
syne, but the mon winna stop ! " 

DEPARTING GUEST: "Oh, don't trouble 
to see me to the door." 

Host: " No trouble at all, old man. It's a 
pleasure." 

WHEN a local train pulled up at the 
Scottish junction where passengers change for 
Kirriemuir, a porter put his head in the 
window of one of the compartments and asked, 
'Anyone here for Kirriemuir?" There was 
no response, and presently the train moved on. 
Then an old Scotswoman in a corner of the 
compartment remarked triumphantly, " A'm 
for Kirriemuir, but I wouldna' tell thatspcerin', 
inquesitivc idiot so ! " 

DONALD," said a drover to a friend, 
' You're drunk again, Donald." 

Don't I wish I was," answered his friend 
disconsolately. 

I'VE lost my appetite," said the least 
remunerative of the paying guests after a 
tremendous dinner. 

" I hope nobody else will find it," whispered 
the anxious hostess to a sympathetic neighbour. 

MA," said the young hopeful, " I do wish 
you'd buy me come panto from that shop over 
there." 

I' Why ?» 

" 'Cos it says on the ticket, ' Can't be 
beaten ! ' " 

HAVE you bad many new dishes since you 
eot your new French cook ? " 

"Rather! A whole new dinner set, and 
she's only been with us about a week ! " 

A FAMOUS actress, being informed by a 
talkative and empty-headed fellow-guest that 
applause was as necessary to actors as the 
common air, replied that she quite agreed with 
him. " ]t gives us time to breathe," she said 
with a quizzical smile. 

THE newspaper did not intend to be funny 
when it informed its readers that an extra 
number of police had been placed on duty in a 
certain quarter to prevent the robberies which 
happened last winter. 



ON the bahk of a Email river (in Ireland, of 
course) there is a stone bearing the following 
inscription: " N.B.— When this stone is covered, 
it is not safe to ford the river." This reminds 
us of a signpost which was formerly to be 
found in Kent, informing the wayfarer that it 
pointed to a bridle path: "But if you can't 
read you had better keep to the main road." 

" JUST put that back where you got it from," 
said Mary when Tim kissed her without 
asking permission. 

WHAT is the chief use of bread," asked 
the school inspector. A dozen hands shot up 
in response. " Well, what's the answer, that 
boy third from the top ? " 

" Please, sir, to spread the butter on," was 
the unexpected answer. 

WHEN the famous Dr. Abernethy was 
canvassing for the office of surgeon to " Barts," 
he called upon a wealthy grocer. The great 
man, filled with the idea of his own importance, 
puffed himself out like a turkey cock on the 
warpath- and said, " I suppose, sir, you want 
my vote and interest at this momentous 
crisis in your career." 

" No, I don't," answered Abernethy. " I want 
a pennyworth of figs. Look sharp and wrap 
them up ; I've got no time to waste-" 

ON arriving at the place of worship the 
minister was somewhat disconcerted to find 
that the congregation consisted of only oce 
man. Remembering that a well-known 
minister had on one occasion preached to one 
man and converted him, he decided to go ahead. 
At the close of a good and long sermon, he 
shook hands with his " congregation," and 
asked him if the sermon had been too long. 
" Oh, it makes no difference to me," was 
the reply, "I'm the cabman wot brought 
you." 

JERROLD, who was rarely at a loss for a 
smart answer, was once asked to subscribe 
to a fund which was being raised to help 
somebody out of his money difficulties. 
" How much will put him on his feel again ? " 
he ask;d. " Oh ! just a one and a couple of 
noughts." " All right," said Jerrold with the 
air of a millionaire philanthropist, " put me 
down for one of the noughts." 

" DO you mean to tell me," asked the 
customer with an earnest look on his face, 
" that one of these stoves will save half my 
coal bill ? " " Why, certainly," said the 
shopman, " I'll answer for that." " Then, 
by Jove," answered the customer, extending 
his hand to clinch the bargain, " I'll lake two 
of them, and save the lot." 

" THAT motion's out of order," said the 
candidate firmly when he saw an arm raised 
to fling a rotten egg at him. 



3 u cruet 



Beggars must not be choosers. 



1914 



THE MOON'S CHANGES. 








Full Moon, 6th, o 41 a.m. 1 New Moon, cist, 27 p.m. 
Last Quarter, 14th, 56 a.m. | First Quarter, 2Sth, 4 53 a.m 


Rises. 

H. M. 


Sets. 

H. M. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


Dav 01 


Aft. 


Aft. 


1 


S 

1T~ 


Lammas. ScottisJi Quarter Day. 2 1 "> 

8th Sunday after Trinity. 


4 23 

425 


2_ 4 « 
746 


4 


58 


II 36 


2 


6 


6 


Mom. 





M 


Bank Holiday. 


4 26 


7 44 


b 


55 


36 


4 


Tu 


Lake Victoria Nyanza discovered, 1858. 


428 


7 42 


7 


28 


1 5° 


5 


W 


First British American cable worked, 185S. 


4 3° 


7 4i 


7 


5° 


3 13 


b 


lH 


Tennyson born, iSog. 


4 32 


7 39 


8 


6 


4 3 6 


7 


* 


Grctto Day. 


4 33 


7 3* 


8 


-9 


5-55 


8 


s 


g. Heligoland ceded to Germany, 1890. 220 


4 35 
4 3 6 


7 36 


8 


3i 


7 11 


9 


s 


9th Sunday after Trinity. 


7 34 


8 


39 


8 23 


10 


M 


9. Coronation of King Edward VII, 1902. 


437 


7 3 2 


8 


50 


9 34 


1 1 


lu 


Half Quarter Day. 


4 39 


7 3° 


9 


1 


10 46 


12 


W 


Grouse Sliopting begins. 


441 


7 2Q 


9 


14 


11 57 


13 


Th 


Sir George Grove, musician, bcrn, 1820. 


442 


727 


9 


3i 


iaio 


M 


F 


Peking Legations relieved, 190?. 


4 44 


7 25 


9 


55 


2 24 


15 


s 


Sir Walter Scott born, 1771. 227 


4 45 
4 47 


7 23 

7 20 


10 
1 1 


3° 

17 


3 35 


16 


10th Sunday after Trinity. 


4 38 


17 


M 


iS. Austrian Emperor born, 1830. 


448 


7 18 


Mc 


rn. 


5 32 


18 


Tu ! 


Great Railway strike, ign. 


4 5° 


7 16 





20 


6 10 


19 


W 1 Balzac died, 1S50. 


45 2 


7 14 


1 


38 


6 38 


20 


Th General Booth died, 1912. 


4 53 


7 12 


3 


3 


6 59 


21 


F j Vimiera, 1808. 


4 55 


7 10 


4 


3i 


7 15 


22 


S j Lord Salisbury died, 1903. 2 34 


4 5 6 


7 8 


5 


59 


7 28 


2 3 


S 11th Sunday after Trinity. 


4 58 


7 t 


7 


26 


7 4i 


24 


iVl j St. Bartholomew. 


5 


7 4 


8 


54 


7 53 


2 5 


Tu Bret Harte born, 1839. 


5 i 


7 ' 


10 


23 


8 8 


26 


W Crecy, 1346. 


5 3 


6*59 


11 


54 


8 28 


27 


TH , Sir Rowland Hill died, 1S79. 


5 5 


658 


ia 


24 


8 55 


28 


F O. W. Holmes born, 1809. 


5 6 


656 


2 


49 


9 34 


29 


S i Sir E. Burne-Jones born, 1833. 24 1 


5j 

5 9 


6 54 
652 


4 


1 


10 27 


3° 


S J 12th Sunday after Trinity. 


4 


54 I 


i' 37 


31 


M , Kandahar, 1880. 2 4^ 


5 "1 


650 


5 


32 Morn. 



MORNING AND EVENING STARS. 

Mercury is in superior conjunction with the 
Sun on the 30th, at greatest western elongation 
on the 5th. 

Venus is an evening star, near the Moon on 
the 24th. 

Mars is an evening star, near the Moon on 
the 24th. 

Jupiter is in opposition to the Sun on the 
10th, neir the Moon on the 6th. 

Saturn is a morning star, near the Moon on 
the 17th. 



SUNS RISING AND SETTING. 




LONDON. 


EDINBURGH 


DUIiL 


H.M. H.M. 


H.M. H.M. 


H.M | 


4 23 : 748 


4 17 8 20 


4 17! 


4 35 ■ 7 36 


4 31 


8 6 


428 


4 45 7 23 


4 44 


75i 


44OI 


4 56! 7 8 


4 58 


7 34 


4 52) 



H.M 
7 54 
742 
72-! 
7 12 
Dublin time. 
Distance of the Sun on the 1st, 94,275,000 miles. 





^z)£l)tt niUf V 1 The sionc ^ iai * s ''oiling can gather r,o moss. 


[1914 


THE MOON'S CHANGES. 


Sun' 


Moon 




Rises. 


Sets. 


Rises. Sets. 


Full Moon, 4th, 2 1 p.m. | New Moon, 19th, 9 33 p.m. 
Last Quarter, 12th, 5 48 p.m. | First Quarter, 26th, 3 p.m. 


H. u. 

5 13 


H. M. 
647 






Aft. 


M r 


I 


Tu 


Partridge Shooting begins. Year 


5 57 57 


2 


W 


Sedan surrendered, 1870. 


5 14 


6 44 


6 13 


2 19 


3 


Th 


Turgenieff died, 1883. 


5i6 


6 42 


6 27 


3 39 


4 


F 


Sir Charles Dilke born, 1843. 


5 17 


6 40 


6 40 


4 54 


5 


S 


Malta surrendered to British, 1805. 248 


5 19 


638 


6 48 


6 8 

7 20 


6 


s 


13th Sunday after Trinity. 


5 21 


636 


6. 58 


7 


M 


6. Burgess swam English Channel, ign. 


5 22 


6 33 


7 8 


8 30 


8 


Tu 


Sebastopol, 1S55. 


5 24 


631 


721 


9 42 


9 


W 


Flodden Field, 1513. 


5 26 


6 29 


7 36 


10 53 


10 


Th 


Pinkie, 1547. 


5 27 


6 27 


7 57 


a 7 


11 


F 


Malplaquet, 1709. ( 


5 29 


6 24 


8 26 


1 19 


12 
*3 


S 

s 


Mr. Asquith born, 1852. 2 55 


5 3° 
53i 


6 22 


9 7 


2 .25 


14th Sunday after Trinity. 


6 20 


10 2 


3 22 


14 


M 


Duke of Wellington died, 1852. 


5 33 


6 18 


11 13 


4 6 


15 


Tu 


Ex-President Taft born, 1857. 


5 34 


615 


Morn. 


4 38 


16 


W 


Post Office Savings Bank opened, 18C1. 


5 36 


6 13 


34 


.5 ! 


17 


Th 


Landor died, 1864. 


5 38 


6 11 


1 59 


5 19 


18 


F 


Dr. Johnson born, 1709. 


5 39 


6 8 


3 26 


5 33 


l 9 


S 


20. Battle of Alma, 1854. 262 


5 4i 


6 6 


4 55 


5 46 
5 58 


20 


s 


15th Sunday after Trinity. 


5 4 2 


6 4 


6 25 


21 


M 


St. Matthew. 


5 43 


6 1 


7 5 6 i- 6 M 


22 


Tu 


Faraday born, 1791. 


5 45 


5 59 


9 29 ! 6 33 


23 


W 


A utumn commences. 


5 47 


5 57 


11 3 6 57 


24 


Th 


23. Neptune discovered, 1S4C. 


5 49 


5 54 


oa34i 7 30 


25 


F 


Lucknow, 1857. 


5 5i 


5 52 


1 52 ; 8 21 


26 s 


Admiral Lord Collingwood born, 1750. 269 


5 52 
5 54 


5 5° 
5 48 


251! 929 


27! s 


16th Sunday after Trinity. 


3 34 ! 10 45 


28; M 


27. George Cruikshank born, 1792. 


5 55 


5 46 


4 1 1 Morn. 


29 Tu 


Michaelmas. Quarter Day. 


5 57 


5 44 


4 20 1 7 


3° 


W 


Earl Roberts born, 1832. 273 


5 53 


5 4i 


4 35 j T 26 




MORNING AND EVENING STARS. 


SUNS RISING AND SETTING. 


Mercury is in Aphelion on the 29th. 
Venus is an evening star, near the Mocn on 


DATE. 


LONDON. jF.DINBURGH 


DUBLIN.* 
H. M.jH. M. 


H. M.jH. M.j H. M. H. M.j 


the 23rd. 


September: 


■5 13 647 i 5 17 ' 7 8 


5 10 : 6 50 


Wni's is an evening star, near the Moon on 
the 21st. 


,1 £ 


5 24 16 31 ! 5 ji 6 5° 


5 22 6 33 


Jupiter is an evening star, near the Moon on 


i. 1.- 


5 34 l 6 Ig-j 5 44 ; 6 32 


5 34 6 r6 


the 2nd. 


>i 2: 


5 45 ! 5 59 ' 5 58 ' 6 14 1 


5 46 <J 


Saturn is a morning star, near the Moon on 


* Dublin time. 


the 13th. 

>- , — — — — — 1 — - 


Distance of the Sun on the 1st, 93, 729,000 miles- 



A Dinner itibricatcs business. 



HINTS FOR HOUSEKEEPERS 



Keep Accounts. 

While it may be perfectly true to say that 
you can't spend more money than you've got, 
the habit of keeping a regular and careful 
account of household expenditure is useful in 
many ways. If a simple system of cross- 
checking, the items being ranged under 
separate heads, be adopted, the housekeeper 
will be able to apportion her spending accord- 
ing to the amount of cash available for the 
week, and any tendency to extravagance in 
one direction or another can be noticed and 
stopped. This applies to small incomes as 
well as large, and though the habit may seem 
useless and irksome at first, it will be found 
in practice to occupy very little time in propor- 
tion to the satisfaction caused by knowing that 
wasteful expenditure is under control. The 
main thing is to keep accounts regularly, in 
which case they give the least trouble and the 
best results. 

Boiled Milk : A Warning. 

When milk has once been boiled it needs to 
be carefully protected from contamination, 
especially by flies or dust, because when once 
the lactic acid bacteria have been destroyed 
by boiling, putrefactive and other bacteria 
gaining access to milk multiply unchecked, 
and such milk is apt to putrefy and acquire 
dangerous properties without showing signs 
of "souring." The absolute cleanliness of 
every vessel used for " boiled milk " is 
essential if danger is to be averted. This 
warning is the more needed because milk is 
boiled in order to make it a safe food for 
infants and young children. 

The Dangerous Housefly. 

It is now generally recognised that flies are 
the carriers of disease germs as well as a 
nuisance when present in large numbers. 
They pass from unclean substances to food 
intended for human consumption, and many 
illnesses are traceable to dirt contagion 
brought about by their agency. No doubt 
they act as scavengers and so do a great 
deal of good, but they are also a danger to 
human life, and their presence in swarms is 
a sure sign that the rules of sanitation have 
not been properly observed by somebody. 
The best remedy is scrupulous cleanliness 
and the use of disinfectant over all decaying 
matter which is awaiting removal. 

A Story with a Moral. 

For four hours the lady remained in the 
shop. She had visited every department 
without spending a penny. Toward the close 
of the afternoon one of the salesmen ven- 
tured to make a mild protest. " Madam," he 
asked sweetly, " are you shopping here ? " 
The lady looked surprised, but not By any 
means annoyed. " Certainly," she replied. 
" Well, madam," said the salesman, " I 
thought perhaps you might be taking an 
inventory." 



In Praise of Apples. 

People ought to know that the very best 
thing they can do is to eat apples just before 
retiring for the night. Persons uninitiated in 
the mysteries of the fruit are liable to throw up 
their hands in horror at the visions of dyspepsia 
which such a suggestion may summon up, but 
no harm can come even to a delicate system by 
the eating of ripe and juicy apples before going 
to bed. 

The apple, says the Family Doctor, is ex- 
cellent brain food because it has more phos- 
phoric acid in easily digested shape than any 
other fruits. It excites the action of the 
liver, promotes sound and healthy sleep, and 
thoroughly disinfects the mouth. This is not 
all : the apple prevents indigestion and throat 
diseases. 

Food for the Sick=Room. 

All food for invalids should be of the simplest 
character and easily digestible. Its preparation 
should be careful, and much can be done to 
tempt the jaded appetite by dainty service and 
such variety as the doctor's orders will permit. 
" A little and often " is what is required during 
convalescence, but food should not be given at 
shorter intervals than two hours in order that 
the digestive system may not be overtaxed. 
Regularity of these so-called meal-times is an 
essential feature of invalid cookery, for the 
patient seems to know by instinct when the 
regular interval has passed, and unpunctuality 
on the nurse's part may mean fretfulness and 
a corresponding rise in temperature. During 
recovery, too, it must be remembered that the 
patient having few interests for the time looks 
forward to a meal as a break in the dull 
monotony of lying idle for days and nights 
together. 

Simple Mental Arithmetic. 

To find the cost of a dozen articles ."—As 
there are twelve pence in a shilling and twelve 
articles to the dozen, twelve articles at a penny 
will cost one shilling, and twelve at a Jd. or id. 
will cost i or j of a shilling, that is, 3d. or 6d. 
The rule therefore is to reckon every penny in 
the price given as a shilling and every farthing 
as 3d. Thus, 12 articles at Is. 5jd. will cost 
12 + Sj = 17j shillings = 17s. 9d. To find the 
price of one where the price of a dozen is given 
reverse the process. Thus, if a dozen cost 
8s. 6d. the price of one will be 83d. 

To find a cost of a score : — For every 
shilling reckon a pound, and for fractions of 
a shilling reckon the equivalent fractions of a 
pound. Thus 20 articles at 4s. 3d. will cost 
£4 + i of £l = £4 5s. 

To find the price per ounce from the price 
per pound in shillings .-—Deduct one-fourth 
from the price per pound, and the result will be 
the price per ounce in pence. Thus, if the 
price per pound is 8s., the price per ounce will 
be 8 - 2 = 6d. 



d^ftOt)f l* 1 Never too old io learn. 








[1914 


THE MOON'S CHANGES. 






Full Moon, 4th, 5 59 a.m. 1 New Moon, igth, 6 34 am. 










Last Quarter, 12th, 9 33 a.m. | First Quarter, 25th, 10 44 p.m. 
















Aft. 

4 47 


Morn. 
2 42 


I 


Th 


Day of 

Pheasant Shooting begins. Year. 


6 


5 39 


2 


J 


1, Cambridge Michaelmas Term begins. 


6 2 


5 37 


4 57 


3 56 


3 


S 


William Morris died, 1896. 276 


6 3 


5 34 


5 6 


5 7 


4 


s 


17th Sunday after Trinity. 


6 5 


5 32 


5 17 


6 18 


5 


iVi 


Dividends on Consols due. 


6 7 53° 


5 29 


7 28 


6 


Tu 


Jenny Lind bom, 1820. 


6 q 


5 27 


5'44 


8 41 


7 


w 


Poe died, 1849. 


6 11 


524 


6 2 


9 52 


8 


Th 


Owens College, Manchester, opened, 1873. 


6 1^ 


S 22 


6 28 


11 5 


9 


r' 


Italy united, 1870. 


6 is 


S 20 


7 3 


oai3 


10 


S 

S 


Ox ford Michaelmas Term begins. 28^ 


6 16 


518 


7 53 


1 12 


1 1 


18th Sunday after Trinity. 


6 18 


516 


8 56 


. l 59 


12 


M 


Michaelmas Law Sittings begin. 


6 20 


5 14 


10 11 


2 3 6 


13 


Tu 


Sainte-Beuve died, 1869. 


6 21 


5 11 


11 31 


3 2 


M 


W 


Fire Insurance ceases. 


6 22 


5 9 


Morn. 


3 21 


i-5 


Th 


Oscar Wilde born, 1856. 


6 24 


5 7 


1 5 6 


3 37 


16 


r' 


Robert Stephenson born, 1803. 


626 


S 5 


2 21 


3 5i 


17 


S 

s 


War in the Balkans, 1912. 2QO 


6 28 


5 3 


3 43 


4 4 


18 


19th Sunday after Trin. St. Luke- 


6 2q 


5 1 


5 18 


4 18 


19 


M 


Leipzig, 1813. 


630 


4.S9 


6 52 


4 34 


20 


Tu 


Lord Palmerston born, 1784. 


632 


4 S7 


8 28 


4 5 6 


21 


W 


Trafalgar Day (1S05). 


6 34 


4 5S 


10 4 


5 27 


22 


Th 


Sarah Bernhardt born, 1845. 


636 


4 53 


11 31 


6 13 


2.3 


F 


Lord St'. Aldwyn born, 1837. 


638 


4 51 


oa 4i. 


7 ]6 


24 


S 


Daniel Webster died, 1852. 2Q7 


6 40 


4 49 


I 31 


8 32 


25 


S 


20th Sunday after Trinity. 


6 41 


4 47 


2 3 


9 54 


26 


M 


Von Moltke born, 1800. 


6 43 


4 45 


2 25 


11 16 


27 


Tu 


Ex-President Roosevelt born 1858. 


6 45 


4 43 


2 43 


Morn. 


2 8 


W 


SS. Simon and Judc. 


646 


4 4i 


2 55 


32 


2Q 


Th 


George Morland, artist, died, 1804. 


648 


4 39 


3 6 


1 47 


]0 


P 1 Sheridan bcrn, 17; 1. 


650 


4 37 


3 16 


2 57 


3 1 


S | Hallowe'en. 304 


6 52 


4 35 


3 26 


4 8 



MORNING AND EVENING STARS. 

Mercury is at greatest eastern elongation on 
the i;th. 

Venus is an evening star, near the Moon on 
the 22nd. 

Mars is an evening star, near the Moon on 
the 20th. 

Jupiter is an evening star, near the Moon on 
the 26th. 

Saturn is a meriting star, near the Moon on 
the nth. 



SUN'S 


RISING AND SETTING. 


DATE. 


LONDON. EDINBURGH 
H.M. H.M. H.M. j H.M. 


DUBLIN • 




h.m.Ih.m. 


October 1 


6 | 5 39 j 6 16 5 50 


6 2 5 37 


8 


6 13 5 22 6 30 1 5 31 


615 1 5 21 


15 


6 24 5 7 | 6 44 1 5 14 


6 28 i 5 4 


11 22 


6 36 ' 4 53 i 6 59 1 4 56 


6 4t 1 449 



* Dublin time. 
Distance of the Sun on. the 1st, 92,978,000 milts. 



& 


oim 


Htj£r ^ merry heart goes all 


he day 






[1914 


THE MOON'S CHANGES. 


Sun 


Moon 


Full Moon, 2nd, n 49 p.m. 1 New Moon, 17th, 4 2 p.m. 
Last Quarter, 10th, 11 37 p.m. | First Quarter, 24th, 1 39 p.m. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


Rises. 


Sets. 


I 


s 


21st Sunday after Trinity. ° a l? { 


H. M. 

6 S4 


H. M. 

4 33 


Aft. 

3 38 


Morn. 

5 17 


2 


M 


Fox-hunting begins. 


6 5 6 


4 32 


3 50 


6 28 


3 


Tu 


Acre, 1840. 


6 58 


4 3° 


4 9 


7 42 


4 


VV 


First " Tube " Railway opened in London, 1890- 


7 


428 


4 32 


8 54 


5 


Th 


Guy Fawkes Day. 


7 1 


4 26 


5 . 5 


10 3 


6 


F 


Blackfriars Bridge opened, 1869. 


7 3 


425 


5 49 


11 6 


7 


S 


Li Hung Chang died, 1901. -3 1 1 


7 4 


423 


6 48 


11 5 6 


8 


s 


22nd Sunday after Trinity. 


7 6 


4 21 


7 53 


033 5 


9 


M 


King Edward VII born, 1841. 


7 a 


419 


9 15 


1 3 


10 


Tu 


ir. Half Quarter Day. 


7 9 


4 18 


10 34 


1 25 


1 1 


W 


Martinmas. Scottish Quarter Day. 


7 « 


4 16 


11 57 


1 41 


12 


Th 


Mrs. Gaskell died, 1865. 


7 13 


414 


Morn. 


1 55 


1.3 


F 


Riots in London, 1887. 


7 15 


4 13 


1 19 


2 7 


14 


S 


Hegel died, 1831. 318 


7 17 


411 


2 46 


2 20 


15 


s 


23rd Sunday after Trinity. 


7 19 


4 10 


4 14 


2 37 


16 


M 


John Bright born. 1811. 


7 20 


4 9 


5 47 


2 55 


17 


Tu 


Suez Canal opened, 1869. 


7 22 


4 » 


7 23 


3 22 


18 


VV 


Sir W. S. Gilbert born, 1836. 


723 


4 


8 58 


4 


19 


Th 


20. Tolstoy died, 1910. 


725 


4 5 


10 19 


4 57 


20 


F 


Sir W. Laurier born, 1841. 


727 


4 3 


11 21 


6 9 


21 


S 


Sir T. Gresham died, 1579. 3^5 


7 28 


4 ? 


a 1 


7 3 2 


22 


s 


24th Sunday after Trinity. 


7 29 


4 


30 


8 55 


2 3 


M 


R. Hakluyt died, 1616. 


7 3J 


3 59 


48 


10 18 


24 


Tu 


Tasmania discovered, 1642. 


7 33 


3 5« 


1 1 


11 34 


25 


VV 


Havelock died, 1857. 


7 35 


3 57 


1 14 


Morn. 


26 


Th 


Queen Maud of Norway born, 1869. 


7 37 


3 5 6 


1 24 


46 


27 


F 


26. Cowper born, 1731. 


7 3* 


3 55 


1 34 


1 57 


28 


S 


Mandalay, 1885. 332 


740 


3 55 


1 45 


3 7 


29 


s 


Advent Sunday. 


741 


3 54 


1 59 


4 18 


30 M 


St. Andrew. 334 


7 43 


3 54 


2 15 


5 29 



MORNING AND EVENING STARS. 

Mercury is in inferior conjunction and 
transits across the Sun's disc on the 7th. 

Venus is in inferior conjunction with the 
Sun on the 27th, near the Moon on the 28th. 

Mars is an evening star, near the Moon on 
the 18th. 

Jupiter is an evening star, near the Moon on 
the 23rd. 

Saturn is a morning star, near the Moon on 
the 7th. 



SUN'S 


RISING AND 


SETTING. 




DATE. 


LONDON. 
H. M. H. M. 


EDINBURGH. 
H. M. H. M. 


DUBLIN.* 




H. M. 


H. M 


November 1 


6 54 4 33 


7 21 


4 32 


6 59 


428 


,. 8 


7 6 4 21 


7 35 


4 18 


7 *3 


4 13 


' :, 15 


7 19 4 10 


7 5o 


4 4 


7 26 


4 2 


1. 22 


721 4 


8 4 


3 53 


7 39 


3 53 


* Dublin time. 


Distance of t 


le Sun on t 


le 1 st 


92.1/ 


5,000 


miles. 



Pity runneth soon in gentle heart. 



OUR ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Windermere. 

Ruskin was not alone in deploring what 
seemed to him the desecration of the Lake 
District of England by the provision of easy 
railway communication from all parts of the 
country. And yet the natural beauty of lake 
and fell remains as superbly attractive as ever. 
Tourists by the hundred pour in every season 
to enjoy the magnificent scenery and to test 
their walking and climbing powers. Water 
and coaching excursions enable everybody to 
appreciate the charm of the district, Winder- 
mere being one of the favourite starting points. 
But to get full enjoyment the visitor must 
make up his mind for steady tramping, for, as 
in Wordsworth's days, the good walker is best 
able to benefit by a holiday among the lakes 
and dales of the hill country. 

Llangollen. 

The " Valley of Jewels," as Llangollen has 
been called, is one of the most beautiful spots 
in North Wales. The town itself presents few 
attractions, but the river Dee flows through it 
in picturesque fashion, and the views from the 
surrounding hills are full of peaceful charm . 
The Church is dedicated to a saint whose full 
name consists of nineteen words after the 
Welsh fashion of long genealogical description. 
A little way outside the town is Plas Newydd, 
or " New Place," the house once inhabited by 
the two " Ladies of Llangollen." A fine piece 
of engineering is shown in the canal, which 
enters the valley on a high viaduct, giving 
water communication with Chester. 

Salisbury Cathedral. 

Salisbury is almost unique among our Eng- 
lish cathedrals by its completely harmonious 
design. The whole structure was built during 
the thirteenth century, the massive central 
tower, crowned by its lofty spire, which is a 
landmark for many miles around, having been 
erected not very long after the main structure. 
Careful restoration in recent times has made 
the venerable cathedral look strangely new, 
and lovers of Decorated Gothic style find ma- 
terial for weeks of study in its wealth of detail. 
It has also the advantage of standing in a big 
open space, so that its fine proportions can be 
fully appreciated. Among the many interesting 
tombs in the interior is one -to the " Boy 
Bishop," and the old-world custom of electing 
a successor is still regularly observed as in 
mediaeval times. 

Highclere Castle. 

About due west from the ancient Roman town 
of Ilchesler, and not far from Newbury, is 
Highclere Castle, one of the seats of Lord Car- 
narvon. It stands in a beautiful park which is 
famous for its stately spreading cedars and 
masses of rhododendron, which present a won- 
derful sight when the bushes are in bloom. The 
castle, which has been carefully modernised, 
stands well. It contains among'other treasures 
a valuable collection of pictures. 



Marlborough. 

Marlborough is a modern foundation, having 
been established just over seventy years ago 
for the purpose of providing a good and cheap 
education to the sons of clergymen, but it has 
already taken a high position among our public 
schools. The scope of the foundation has been 
considerably widened with good results, and 
Marlborough now ranks very high, giving par- 
ticular attention to candidates for the army. 
The college was originally housed in the old 
Castle Inn, which was closed when coaching 
was superseded by the railways, and the 
building, which has a fine garden-front, is still 
used. It was formerly in possession of the 
Seymour family, and the bowling green of the 
old garden is carefully preserved. 

Edinburgh. 

The " Athens of the North," as seen from 
the commanding height of the Castle, or from 
" Arthur's Seat," presents a wonderfully im- 
pressive picture. The old town, with its steep 
descent towards Holyrood Palace.still preserves 
many of the features of a mediaeval capital, 
while the Calton Hill, the modern residential 
quarter, rises steeply above the valley. St. 
Giles' Church, where the famous stool- 
throwing episode took place as a protest aga nst 
the attempt to impose English episcopalianism 
on Scotland, is an interesting building, and 
every visitor pays pilgrimage to John Knox's 
old house, which is preserved with pious care. 
In the " wynds " of the lower town there is 
much poverty, the crowded tenements giving 
ample opportunity for religious and social work. 

Hawthornden, 

The romantically situated home of the Scot- 
tish poet, William Drummond, js in Midlothian, 
within a short walk of Roslin. Its literary 
interest for English readers lies|mainly in the 
fact that Ben Jonson, in the course of his long 
walking tour from London to Scotland, visited 
his brother poet, and while enjoying his hos- 
pitality, talked at large on many subjects. The 
famous " Conversations " were the result of 
careful notes made by Drummond, who ap- 
parently was not greatly impressed by his dis- 
tinguished visitor's indiscreet revelations of 
personal matters. The two men corresponded 
for some time, but their temperaments were 
too diverse to allow of much real sympathy 
between them. 

Lincluden Abbey. 

In the romantic border county of Dumfries- 
shire, which has so many associations with 
Robert Burns, are to be found the ruins of 
Lincluden Abbey. The foundation, which dates 
back to the twelfth century, was originally for 
a convent of Benedictine nuns, but was con- 
verted into a collegiate church some two cen- 
turies later. The remains were described by 
Burns as " an old ruin in a sweet situation at 
the confluence of the Cluden and the Nith." 



Wttt IXlUtV] Friends are more easily lost han made. 




[1914 ] 


TTTTP, IVTOOTST'S HTTA-NTn 


BS. 

h, 2 35 a m. 
4th, 8 25 a.m. 


Sun 


R' 


Moon 


Full Moon 


, 2nd, 6 21 p.m. 1 New Moon, ijt 


Rises. 


Sets. 


ses. 


Sets. 


Last Quarter, ioth, n 32 a.m. | First Quarter, 2 


H. M. 

7 45 


H. M. 

3 54 


Aft. 
2 36 


Morn. 

6 43 


J 


Tu 


Queen Alexandra born, 1844. 


Day ot 
Year 


2 


W 


Austerlitz, 1805. 




746 


3 53 


3 


6 


7 53 


3 


Th 


4. R. L. Stevenson died, 1894. 




7 47 


3 53 


3 


47 


8 59 


4 


F 


T. Carlyle born, 1795. 




7 4« 


3 52 


4 


42 


9 53 


5 
6 


S 


Sir Henry Tate died, 1899. 


339 


7 49 


3 52 


5 


49 


10 35 

11 7 


S 


2nd Sunday in Advent 


# 


7' 5o 


35i 


7 


5 


7 


M 


General Buller born, 1839. 




7 bi 


3 5i 


8 


23 


11 30 


8 


Tu 


De Quincey died, 1859. 




7 53 


3 51 


9 


43 


11 48 


Q 


W 


Milton born, 1608. 




7 54 


3 5o 


11 


3 


a 1 


IO 


Th 


Grouse and Black Game Shooting ends. 


7 5* 


3 50 


M 


orn. 


14 


II 

12 


F 
S 


Magersfontein, 1899. 
Plevna, 1877. 


346 


7 57 
7 58 

7 59 


3 5c 
3 50 




1 


24 

47 


26 

40 


13 


S 


3rd Sunday in Advent, 




3 49 


3 


14 


56 


J 4 


M 


The Prince Consort died, 1861. 




7 59 


3 49 


4 


48 


1 17 


1 5 


Tu 


Colenso, 1899. 




8 


3 49 


6 


22 


1 5° 


16 


W 


Cromwell, LorJ Protector, 1653. 




8 1 


3 49 


7 


49 


2 36 


17 


Th 


Oxford Michaelmas Term ends. 




8 2 


3 5o 


9 


1 


3 4i 


18 


F 


19. Turner died, 1851. 




8 3 


3 5o 


9 


53 


5 2 


19 


S 


Cambridge Michaelmas Term en s. 


353 


8 4 


3 5o 


10 


27 


6 30 

7 55 


20 


s 


4th Sunday in Advent. 




8 4 


3 5i 


10 


49 


21 


M 


Michaelmas Law Sittings end. 




8 <; 


3 5i 


11 


7 


9 i5 


22 


Tu 


Winter commences. 




8 q 


3 5i 


11 


19 


10 32 


2^ 


W 


Sir R. Arkwright died, 1792. 




8 6 


3 52 


11 


30 


11 44 


24 


Th 


Christmas Eve. 




8 6 


3 52 


11 


4i 


Morn. 


25 


F 


Christmas Day. Quarter Day. 




8 7 


3 53 


11 


52 


55 


26 

27 


S 


Boxing Day. Bank Holiday. 


360 


8 7 


3 53 


a 3 


2 6 


s 


1st Sun. after Christmas 


St. John 


8 7 


3 54 





IQ 


3 i 6 


28 


M 


Innocents' Day. 




8 8 


3 55 





38 


4 28 


29 


Tu 


Gladstone born, 1809. 




8 8 


3 56 


1 


4 


5 4i 


^0 


W 


Rudyard Kipling born, 1865. 




8 8 


3 57 


1 


43 


6 48 


31 


Th 


Wycliffe died, 1384. 


3^ 


8 8 


3 58 


2 


34 


7 47 


r 


CORNING AND EVENING STARS. 


SUN'S 


3 RISI 


NG Al 


\ID SETTING. 


Mercury is in Aphelion on the 26th. 

Venus is a morning star, near the Moon on 
the 15th. 

Mars is in conjunction with the Sun on the 
24th, near the moon on ihe 17th. 


DATE. 


LONDON. [E 


DINBURGH. 


DUBLIN.* 


December 1 
.. 8 


H.M. 

7 45 
7 53 


H.M. 

3 54 « 

3 51 


H.M. 

5 1\ 

5 33 


H.M. 

3 42 
3 37 


H.M. . H.M 

7 54 1 3 43 

8 5:3 30 


Jupiter is an evening star, near the Moon on 
the 21st. 

Saturn is in opposition to the Sun on the 21st, 
near the Moon on the 4th and 31st. 


15 
Distance of 


8 

8 5 

* I 

the Sut 


3 49 

3 51 
Dublin 
1 on the 


3 42 

3 46 
time 
ist, 


3 34 
3 37 

31.584 


812 3 38 
8 17 i 3 4i 

000 miles. 


1 — — — ■ , 



Suspicion hath a ready tongue. 



A PAGE OF EPIGRAMS. 



JFHE epigram, which has had a long- and notable 
-*- career from the days of the ancient Greeks 
down to the present time, is now less popular 
than it was, but its peculiar qualities of pungent 
brevity still makes it a useful literary weapon in 
capable hands. It has been compared with 
a bee : — 

The body should always be little and sweet, 
And a sting should be left in the tail." 
Another description likens it to a wasp : 
" With taper body bound 
By lines not many, neat and round. 
All ending in a sting." 
And certainly its victims have often writhed in 
helpless pain under the operation. Some of 
the most effective epigrams are signed by 
that voluminous writer 
known as " Anon.", one 
of the best remem- 
bered being that cir- 
culated more than a 
hundred years ago at 
the time of the disas- 
trous Walcheren Expe- 
dition :— 

"The Earl of Chatham, 

with his sword 

drawn, 
Stood waiting for Sir 

Richard Strahan ; 
Sir Richard, longing 

to be at 'em, 
Stood waiting for the 

Earl of Chatham." 



But still the party system survives as the most 
efficient method of " getting things done." 

As might be expected, the clergy in past times 
came in for a good deal of mockery at the hands 
of their critics. Here, for example, is a pointed 
piece of satire on the "hunting parson," a type 
now all but, if not quite, extinct. It was written 
by Robert Herrick, who was himself a country 
parson in Devonshire for many years : — 

" Old Parson Beans hunts six days of the week, 
And on the seventh has his notes to seek ; 
Six days a week he halloas so much breath 

away, 
That on the seventh he can nor preach nor 

pray." 

Sermons of portentous length are no longer in 
fashion, but the follow- 
ing quatrain expresses 
the feelings of one who 
suffered from drowsi- 
ness in church : — 



The Challenge. <S> 

The King, observing with judicious J 

eyes, V 

The state of both his Universities, v" 

To Oxford sent a troop of horse ; and § 

■why ? § 

That learned body -wanted loyalty : <£ 

To Cambridge books he sent, as -well § 

discerning A 

How -much that loyal body wanted § 

learning, A 



comment which deal 



Politics provided a 
fruitful field for epi- 
gram writers, who sa- 
tirised prominent men 
belonging to the op- 
posite party without 
mercy and without re- 
straint. But here are 
two specimens of genera 
with subjects not untopical at the present time 
The Treaty of Utrecht in 1715 gave great dis- 
satisfaction in many quarters which Pope ex- 
pressed in the following couplet : — 
" Now Europe's balanc'd, neither side prevails ; 
For nothing's left in either of the scales." 

So, too, in 1801, when the Union between 
Great Britain and Ireland was consummated, a 
Dublin barrister jocularly wrote: — 
"Why should we complain that the times are 
so bad, 
Pursuing a querulous strain ? 
When Erin gives up all the rights that she had, 
What right has she left to complain ? " 

The non-party view of Georgian politics was 
thus formulated by Allan Ramsay : — 

" Whig and Tory scratch and bite, 
lust as hungry dogs, we see ; 
Toss a bone 'twixt two, they fight ; 
Throw a couple, they agree." 



The Reply. 

The King to Oxford sent a trcop of 

horse, 
For Tories own no argument butfo?'ce; 
With equal skill to Cajnbriage books 

he sent. 
For Whigs admit no force but argu- 

ment - [Date, 1715. 



' When he holds forth, 
his reverence doth 
appear 

So lengthily his sub- 
ject to pursue, 
That listeners, out of 
patience, often 
fear 

He has indeed eter- 
nity in view." 



But no section of so- 
ciety haj been exempt 
from the attack of the 
epigrammatist. Law- 
yers, doctors, pr'nees 
and tradesmen, have all 
been the butt of these 
sharp arrows of wit. 
Many epigrams, of 
course, depend for their 
power of wounding up- 
on topical allusions which have long been forgot- 
ten except by scholars, and, indeed, epigrams of 
general application to all time are comparatively 
rare. The art of lampooning is not yet lost, but 
the cult of 'the epigram has been largely ex- 
changed for other forms of satire. 

In spite of this, it is pretty certain that 
the epigram, if wielded by a practised hand 
at the expense of politicians or other men 
who are prominently before the public, might 
still be a deadly political weapon. Its com- 
parative disuse in modern times is due to 
several causes including the universal circu- 
lation of newspapers. When reading was 
not yet an accomplishment so common that 
an illiterate person was rarely met with, the 
epigram could be passed by word of mouth and 
often produced a very damaging effect, Nowa- 
days the epigram is more or less neglected, 
but it had a great vogue in the eighteenth 
century, when politicians were defended and 
attacked by rival pamphleteers, and the smartest 
wits took part in the wordy warfare. 



Poets are born, not made. 



A PAGE OF VERSE. 



Wise Old Age. 

THE Seas are quiet when the winds give o'er ; 
So calm are we when passions are no more. 
For then we know how vain it was to boast 
Of fleeting things so certain to be \o?X. 

Clouds of affection from our younger eyes 
Conceal that emptiness which age descries ! 
The soul's dark cottage, battered and decayed, 
Lets in new light through chinks that time has 
made. 

Stronger by weakness, wiser men become, 
As they draw nearer their eternal home ; 
Leaving the old, both worlds at once they view, 
That stand upon the threshold of the new. 

Waller. 
March Weather. 

THE cock is crowing, 
The stream is flowing, 
The small birds twitter, 
The lake doth glitter, 

The green field sleeps in the sun ; 
The oldest and youngest 
Are at work with the strongest ; 
The cattle are grazing, 
Their heads never raising : 

There are forty feeding like one! 

Like an army defeated, 

The snow hath retreated, 

And now doth fare ill 

On the top of the bare hill : 
The ploughboy is whooping— anon— anon ; 

There's joy in the mountains; 

There's life in the fountains ; 

Small clouds are sailing, 

Blue sky prevailing; 
The rain is over and gone. 

Wordsworth. 

The Puzzle of Life. 

'TIS strange 
How we do change ! 
First to live and then to die 
Is a great misery ■ 
To give us sense great pains to feel ; 
To make our lives to be Death's wheel ; 
To give us sense and reason too, 
Yet know not what we're made to do ; 
And senses which like hounds do run about, 
Yet never can the perfect truth find out. 
O Nature, Nature ! cruel to mankind, 
Who gives us knowledge, misery to find. 
Margaret, Duchess of Newcastle, 
A Lover's Plea. 

LOVE me not for comely grace, 
For my pleasing eye or face, 
Nor for any outward part, 
No, nor for my constant heart,— 
For those may fail, or turn to ill, 
So thou and I shall sever. 

Keep, therefore, a true woman's eye, 
And love me still, but know not why— 
So hast thou the same reason still 
To doat upon me ever. Anon. 



The Wonder of the Stars. 

WHEN I survey the bright 

Celestial sphere, 
So rich with jewels hung, that night 

Doth like an Ethiop bride appear, 

My soul her wings doth spread, 

And heavenward flies, 
The Almighty's mysteries to read 

In the large volume of the skies. 

For the bright firmament 

Shoots forth no flame 
SO silent, but is eloquent 

In speaking the Creator's name. 

No unregarded star 

Contracts its light 
Into so small a character, 

Removed far from our human sight, 

But if we steadfast look, 

We shall discern 
In it, as in some holy book, 

How man may heavenly knowledge learn. 
Halington. 

Love Triumphant. 

WERE I as base as is the lowly plain, 

And you, my Love, as high as heaven above, 

Yet should the thoughts of me your humble 
swain 
Ascend to heaven, in honour of my Love. 

Were I as high as heaven above the plain, 
And you, my Love, as humble and as low 

As are the deepest bottoms of the main, 

Wheresoe'er you were, with you my Love 
should go. 

Were you the earth, dear Love, and I the skies, 
My love should shine on you like to the sun, 

And look upon you with ten thousand eyes 
Till heaven wax'd blind, and till the world 
were done. 

Wheresoe'er I am, below, or else above you, 
Wheresoe'er you are, my heart shall truly love 
you. J. Sylvester. 

Constancy. 

To me, fair friend, you never can be old, 
For as you were when first your eye I eyed, 
Such seems your beauty still. Three winters 

cold 
Have from the forests shook three summers' 

pride ; 

Three beauteous springs to yellow autumn 

turn'd 
In process of the season have I seen, 
Three April perfumes in three hot Junes burn'd, 
Since first I saw you fresh which yet are green. 

Ah ! yet doth beauty, like a dial hand, 
Steal from his figure, and no pace perceived : 
So your sweet hue, which methinks still doth 

stand, 
Hath motion, and mine eye may be deceived : 

For fear of which, hear this, thou age unbred, — 
Ere you were bor.i, was beauty's summer dead. 
W. Shakespeare. 



It's a long lane that has no turning. 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



JFHE story of the Panama Canal is one of con- 
^ stant struggle with the forces of Nature. 
For long the idea of cutting a waterway through 
the narrow isthmus which connects the vast 
masses of land known as North and South 
America had haunted the minds of men, but it 
was not until the Suez Canal had shortened 
the sea passage from Europe to India and the 
Far East, that any serious attempt was made 
to provide a similar means of communication 
between the Atlantic and the Pacific. In the 
late seventies of last century various schemes 
began to be considered, and, as was only natu- 
ral, Ferdinand de Lesseps, the engineer who 
had brought the Suez Canal undertaking to a 
successful issue, took a prominent part in the 
deliberations. 

France Tries and Pails. 

Eventually a French company was formed 
under de Lesseps to cut a canal through 
Panama, and the work was begun with hopes 
of completion within a reasonable time. An 
enormous amount of capital was sunk in pro- 
viding elaborate machinery for dredging and 
excavating, and fair progress was made in spite 
of tremendous obstacles. But tropical nature 
and deadly fevers of various kinds defeated 
the plans of the French engineers. At Suez 
they had to deal with a level, healthy desert 
where the principal obstacle to progress was 
drifting sand. At Panama the conditions were 
far more difficult. The virgin forest had to be 
pierced and the way kept open, but so quickly 
does vegetation grow in that moist hot climate 
that puny man could barely hold the strip of 
territory won by ceaseless toil. Cuttings, too, 
on a stupendous scale were needed at some 
points, but the enemy which finally triumphed 
over all that engineering skill could do was 
disease. Labourers died like flies in that 
pestilential climate. One company succeeded 
another, and fresh capital had to be raised, 
but in the end wild Nature triumphed. The 
" Panama Scandals," with their stories of 
bribery and corruption, ruined many prominent 
Frenchmen, and de Lesseps himself was in- 
volved in the collapse of the gigantic under- 
taking on whoae success he had pledged his 
reputation. He died an old man in 1894, broken 
by the disaster which had overshadowed his 
later years. 

The United States take over the Work. 

Even now faith in the scheme first mooted 
to Philip the Second of Spain drew the imagi- 
nation—and the money— of French investors. 
Another syndicate was formed and carried on 
the work at the great Culebra Cut until funds 
were again exhausted ; and ten years later, in 
1904, the United States Government took over 
the whole of the property— and the work— for a 
sum of forty million dollars. De Lesseps and 
his friends had been over-sanguine in their 
estimate of cost, and, moreover, the'r plans 
were laid for a sea-level canal, which meant 
an enormous extra amount of cutting. Before 
restarting work the United States Government 



made an exhaustive inquiry into the whole 
problem, and it was eventually decided, after A 
hot controversy, to adopt a system of locks. 

Sanitary Precautions. 

It was recognised, too, that to ensure success 
disease must be stamped out by drastic pre- 
ventive measures. Experience in Cuba and 
in the Philippine Islands, where sanitation has 
transformed the conditions of living, proved 
invaluable, and yellow fever was practically 
stamped out before any fresh excavation was 
commenced. When the French were engaged 
on the work little was known of the ways in 
which to combat tropical fevers, and the 
engineers' houses were gay and picturesque 
with flowers, but veritable deathtraps. The 
American sanitary staff on taking charge in- 
stituted under something like military discipline 
a comprehensive system of precautions. All 
stagnant pools — the breeding places of the 
mosquito— were either drained or treated with 
paraffin, and every house along the line of the 
Canal was rendered mosquito proof with close 
wire netting. The latest methods of inocu- 
lation were adopted, and all the workmen, 
coloured as well as white, were protected 
against disease, or treated with prompt atten- 
tion by the efficient medical staff. The cost 
of this preliminary campaign was very heavy, 
but it was fully justified by results. Had it 
not been undertaken and proved successful, it 
may be doubted whether even the United States 
could have brought the stupendous task to 
completion. It was, indeed, this achievement 
which made success possible. The deadly mos- 
quito is now rarely met with along the Canal, 
and the death-rate amongt he army of workers 
is only about eleven per thousand, which com- 
pares favourably with that in any of the great 
cities of North America or this country. 

An Engineering Mirvel. 

Under expert administration and control, 
and with an unlimited supply of funds, U12 
work has proceeded so rapidly that the Canal has 
now nearly reached completion, and for grandeur 
of conception may well be reckoned one of the 
wonders of the world. It is fifty miles long, 
with a minimum bottom width of 300 feet, 
and a minimum depth of 41 feet. The principal 
features of its construction are the great dam 
which turns the valley of the Chagres river 
into a huge lake, the locks built of solid 
concrete in pairs, and capable of raising or 
lowering the biggest ships now afloat, and the 
Culebra Cut. 

This is where the American engineers have 
met their chief difficulties. It is the deepest 
open cutting in the world, and its size and 
the torrential rainfall have combined to bring 
about landslides, which even now have not been 
altogether overcome, and which involve a 
huge amount of unforeseen excavation and ad- 
ditional cost. 

The question of tolls and other problems, 
notably the changes in routes which the use of 
the Canal may effect, cannot be dealt with here. 



Good talkers make good listeners. 



LITERATURE AND POLITICS. 



JFHOUGH mere eloquence is not enough to gain 
-*■ political reputation for any man, and though, 
indeed, it is not essential to successful states- 
manship, its persuasive attractiveness is as great 
as ever. The character of the House of Commons 
has changed considerably of late years, but there 
is still room in it for the cultivation of a graceful 
style, and the expression of views informed by 
wide reading and knowledge of men and manners. 
Greek and Latin tags are very rarely heard, Mr. 
Gladstone being one of the last of the old school 
who could employ classical quotations to enforce 
or illustrate his argument with the certainty that 
they would be readily appreciated by those who 
listened to his torrential flow of words. Yet there 
are even in these days of democratic government 
many members of Parliament who are genuine 
lovers and students of literature, and whose 
speeches show acquaintance with the best that 
has been written in the language of our fore- 
fathers. The noble Authorised Version of the 
Bible provides as fine a basis for worthy speech 
as anyone could desire, and orators like John 
Bright were most effective when they kept 
most closely to its inimitably simple, nervous 
style. 

Among the literary men who have made their 
mark in Parliament in recent years one of the 
most accomplished w-as Mr. George Wyndham, 
whose tragically sudden death at the early age of 
fifty deprived the Unionist party of one of its most 
versatile and brilliant members. Well born, and 



endowed with physical and intellectual gifts of 
the highest order, the " Admirable Crichton " of 
modern politics, who will always be remembered 
in connection with the Irish Land Purchase Act 
of 1903, was a scholar of no mean order. His 
studies in Elizabethan and old French literature, 
on which he wrote with the enthusiasm born of 
knowledge, made him a very attractive speaker. 
His eloquence was of the rather florid order, but 
it had a genuine ring. On the other side of the 
House, Mr. Birrell, genial philosopher and es- 
sayist, displays much of that brilliant wit which 
we associate with the eighteenth century, which 
he has studied to such good purpose. But on 
occasion when, as on the subject of Irish 
grievances and aspirations, his feelings are 
deeply stirred, he has several times risen to a 
very high pitch of lyrical, almost rhapsodic 
fervour. At such times the House listens spell- 
bound, as indeed it should, for eloquence like his 
is all too rare. 

Mr. Balfour is another example of (he cultured 
man whom the House of Commons delights to 
hoViour when he rises to speak. The ex-leader 
of the Opposition, whose interests include music 
and golf, as well as the wide field of literature 
and philosophy, is always worth hearing. As a 
Parliamentary debater he has still few equals, 
and his dialectical skill and ability to propound 
dilemmas for his opponents are ungrudgingly 
acknowledged by those who do not share his 
political views on most subjects. 



THE GENTLE ART OF DOQ=STEALING. 



UjHE dog-thiet is a creature who is always on 
■*■ the look-out, and the more valuable a pet 
animal may be the greater must be the care taken 
by his owner to avoid loss to himself and subse- 
quent profit to the despicable person who lives 
by stealing and reselling other people's dumb 
faithful companions. Nowadays, when a pedigree 
dog may be worth anything up to ^1,500, the 
temptation to steal is greater than ever, and the 
methods of capture adopted are often ingeniously 
elaborate, making detection very difficult. In 
many cases the dog's powers of scent are used, 
meat soaked in oil of aniseed being a very at- 
tractive bait to lure the victim out of sight of 
his owner, when the dog is picked up and his 
collar removed and the thief takes the unsus- 
pecting animal off to a safe hiding place until 
an opportunity of selling it at an exorbitant price 
occurs. The " dog-snatcher " relies upon quick- 
ness of action and the carelessness of owners, 
who may be too absorbed in conversation to look 
after their pets. If the dog is a " toy " he may 
be spirited into a basket, and when the owner 
realises his or her loss a confederate is usually 
close at hand to send the hunt in the wrong 
direction. Women thieves are expert in this 
class of offence, using narcotics to prevent the 
dog from making noisy protest which might lead 
to discovery. 

A good many of the thefts are casual in 
character, the thief waiting about till an oppor- 
tunity occurs of making a haul. But in some 



cases a regular plan of campaign is laid down 
and carried out with leisurely precision. A par- 
ticularly good dog will be watched, and his 
points carefully noted. Newspaper advertise- 
ments for " dogs wanted " are studied, and a 
dog corresponding to the requirements of the 
advertiser is stolen and sent off to the unsuspect- 
ing customer, who little knows that he may be 
paying an exaggerated price for stolen property. 
So lucrative is this business to some members of 
the " profession " that they have been known to 
drive about a neighbourhood in a smart pony- 
trap, or perhaps " dog-cart," keeping a sharp 
look-out for animals likely to fetch a good price 
in the market. Sometimes, to avoid suspicion, a 
boy is employed to play about the road in which 
the dog to be stolen lives, and as opportunity 
offers the youngster makes friends with the 
victim and eventually procures him for the real 
thieves, who keep carefully out of the way. 

This form of theft is exceedingly difficult to 
keep in check, for the offenders show extraor- 
dinary versatility in their methods. All dog- 
lovers resent a class of petty offence which 
often inflicts terrible suffering on dumb crea- 
tures, besides depriving ' owners of faithful 
friends whose value cannot be reckoned in cash. 

The police do what they can to secure convic- 
tions, but the same offenders appear in court 
time after time, punishment seeming to have 
little or no deterrent effect upon a habit which is 
as contemptible as it is cowardly and cruel. 



stamps, (fees, §«&s, #£. 



Stamp Duties, &c. 

Agreement, or Memorandum of Agree- 
ment, under hand only, not otherwise 
charged -.. 

Appraisement or Valuation of any 
estate where the amount shall not 
exceed £s 



£ s. d. 

o o- 6 



Notexcd.£ic 
,, 20. ..o 



Not excd.^50 
100 

200 



,, 40. ..o 2 

Exceeding£soo . 

Apprenticeship Indentures 

Armorial Bearings (Great Britain). 

If used on any carriage ,, 
Bills of Exchange, payable on 

demand 

Bills of Exchange of any other kind, 
and Promissory Notes : — 
Not exceeding £5, id. ; ,£10, 2d. ; 
£ 2 5, 3d-; £5°, 6d.; £75, gd.; .£100, is. 
Every £100 and fraction of £100 of 

larger amount 

Bill of Lading 

Certificate. — Of goods duly entered 

inwards, for drawback 

Of birth, baptism, marriage, or burial 

Conveyance, where purchase-money 

shall not exceed £5 



15- 



25- 



For every £25 up to £300 

Exceeding £300, every £50 

Draft, or Order, or Letter of Credit, 

on demand 

Limited Liability Companies, 

every £100 of capital to be raised ... 

Marriage Licence (Special), England 

and Ireland 

Not Special 

Passport 

Receipt, £2 or upwards (penalty for 

receipt without stamp, £10) 

Estate Duty. 

Where the principal or capital value 
does exceed £100 but not £500 — 
1 per cent. The higher amounts are 
then charged at increments of 1 per 
cent, until 14 per cent, is charged 
for an amount from £800,000 but 
not exceeding £1,000,000. Exceeding 
this amount, 15 per cent, is charged. 

Legacy and Succession Duty, either one 
or both, is also charged on inherit- 
ances according to their nature, at 5 
or 10 per cent. 

House Duty. 

On inhabited houses, occupied as farm- 
house, or for any business, of the 
annual value of 

£20, and not exceeding £40 \ < 

£fo ■■■■: v$< 

Exceeding £00 I „, < 

Private houses, annual value of 
£20 and not exceeding £40 .. 

£60 

Exceeding £60 



001 



500 
o 10 o 
006 

001 



Patent for Inventions (Letters). £ s. d. 

Application for patent 100 

Complete specification 300 

Before tlieexpi-) ,., ("year from date ofl „ 

rationoflhe J 4th \ patent / 5 ° ° 

5th „ 600 

„ 6th „ 700 

7th „ 800 

8th ,, 900 

„ 9th ,, ro o o 

,, 10th ,, 11 o 

,, Ilth ,, 12 o o 

„ isth ,, 13 o 

„ 13th ,, 14 o o 

The patentee may pay the whole or any portion 
of the aggregate of the prescribed annual 
fees in advance. 
Every patent granted for fourteen years from 
date of application, subject to payment of fee 
before expiration of fourth and each year 
during term of patent. 

Income Tax. 

For income tax is. 2d. is made the standard, 
and to this a super-tax of 6d. in £ is added on 
as much of income as exceeds £3,000 when 
total income exceeds £5,000. But earned 
incomes up fo £2,000 will pay at od., and 
those up to £3,000 at is. 

Incomes exempt up to .£160 : and abatements 
up to £400 of £160; to £500 of £150; to 
£600 of £120 ; and to £700 of £70. Also on 
incomes up to £500 a reduction on assessment 
of £10 in respect of each child under sixteen. 

Various Licences and Duties. 
Carriages, Annual Licence (Great £ s. d. 
Britain) :^- 
With four or more wheels, drawn, 
adapted, fitted for two or more 
horses or mules, or propelled by 

mechanical power 220 

With four or more wheels, drawn, 
adapted, fitted, to be for one horse 

or mule only 1 1 o 

With fewer than four wheels o 15 o 

For every hackney carriage o 15 o 

Motor-cars pay a further duty. 

Dogs of any kind, Great Britain 076 

„ „ Ireland, one dog ... o z 6 

Every additional dog, Ireland 020 

Game Licences (U.K.), after 31st July 

and to expire on 31st July following 300 

After 31st July, expire 31st October 200 

After 31st October, expire 31st July 20 o 

Gamekeepers, Great Britain 200 

,, Ireland 300 

Game Dealer's Licence (U.K.) 200 

Gun or Pistol Licence o 10 o 

House Agents, letting furnished houses 

above £25 a year 200 

Passenger vessels, liquors and tobacco : — 

Yearly ■•••• 10 o o 

One day 200 

Pawnbrokers 7 10 o 

Pedlars, Police Licence 050 

Retailers of wine:— (according 

■ On : £4 10s. to £i2J to 

Off 3 IOS - >> 10 lann. value. 

Servants, annual for every male servant 

(Great Britain) o 15 o 

Tea, Custorns duty, per lb 005 

Tobacco and Snuff, Dealers in o 5 3 



m 






ffi 



OS 

B 
I 



83 



A Customer writes 



"I CANT THINK 



how you 
can manage to give such wonderful 
value for the money." 
Ladies write 
AGAIN and AGAIN 
YEAR AFTER YEAR 

for MORE AND MORE 
it shews that 
THE ARTICLE MUST BE COOS. 



THE WONDERFUL, WORLD-FAMED 

DARTMOOR 
SERGE 

IN NAVY, BLACK, AND OTHER COLOURS. 
64 Inches Wide, 




MARVELLOUS 
VALUE. 



A MOTHER says: 

" I am charmed with it. I first 
bought it for my girls, but it was 
so good that I've had several 
skirts made of it for myself. I think 
it is marvellous for the money." 

-*- 

LOOKS BETTER AND LASTS LONGER 

than material at double the price. 



FASHIONABLE. SEASONABLE. 

ECONOMICAL. 

-5- 

Just write for 
FREE PATTERNS 

and judge for yourself. 




I JAMES PEARSE k Co., Serge Factors, EXETER. 






"LINSEED COMPOUND" 



FOR 



[Trade Mark) 

COUGHS AND 



COI-DS. 



HIN rS WHERE MEDICAL AID IS ABSENT. 
"If any thins is worfa knovrla?, it is worthy of being extensively Uaown." 



A most effective remedy for and pre- 
ventative against the consequences 
arising from exposure to Cold and 
Catarrh. 

When we consider the serious and 
fatal complaints which have their origin 
in a slight Cold — complaints which may 
be the prelude to various inflammatory 
diseases, and of which Consumption may 
be one of its terminations — the advan- 
tage of such a remedy will be acknow- 
ledged by all. 

A COLD 
will, with different individuals, show 
itself in a variety of forms, the most 
common being Coryza, or Cold in the 
Head, well known by the lassitude, 
weariness, and flying pains over the 
body, fullness about the head, weight 
or pain across the forehead, dry, 
stuffed-up nostrils, frequent sneezing, 
with " bit of a cough," and tightness 
across the chest, etc. 

At once let the patient take a tea- 
spoonf ulof Linseed Compound mixed with 
a wineglassful of warm water at bed- 
time — follow the directions given with 
each bottle, and much evil will be 
avoided. An instance : — 
From the Rev. D. G. Thomas, Curate of 
St. Luke's Church, Heywood. 
Hey wood, 
Messrs. Kay Brothers, May 3rd, 1866. 

Sirs, — With regard to the efficacy of 
your Compound Essence of l.inse d in re- 
lieving Coughs, Colds, etc., I am happy 
to give you my experience of it. I have 
only had to try it once, and then it 
completely cured me. At that time I 
was suffering from a very harassing 
cough — the remnants of a severe cold — 
the effect of the remedy was soon per- 
ceptible, and in a day or two the cough 
was entirely gone. — Yours truly, 

D.G.Thomas. 
INFLUENZA 
Is the same, heralded by spinal chills 
and more fever, in whith case it be- 



comes dangerous. In the absence of 
a doctor — give an adult a coup'.e of 
Mountain Flax (Linum Catharticum) Pills 
— a teaspoonful of Linseed Compound in 
hot water — hot mustard bath for the 
feet, and drink abundance of warm 
gruel. 

PULMONARY CATARRH OR COLD 
ON CHEST. 

That this complaint may be the better 
understood, it is requisite to know that 
the windpipe and bronchial tubes — the 
tubes leading from the windpipe to the 
lungs — are lined with a delicate mem- 
brane, called the mucous membrane, 
which in a state of health is kept 
constantly moist by a secretion of mucus 
— a bland, non-irritating fluid. The 
first effect of cold on this membrane is to 
render it dry ; its secretion is suspended, 
it becomes tumid and swollen, and then 
begins to form phlegm — the accumula- 
tion and necessary expectoration of 
which causes a very exhausting cough, 
which severely strains the muscles of 
the chest and luDgs. 

This cough, by the neglect of ordinary 
precautions and suitable remedies, 
engrafts itself on the system, making a 
person what is termed " delicate on the 
chest," susceptible to every cold draught 
of air ; or it produces a chronic "Winter 
Cough" with, perhaps, Asthma, or if 
there be inflammation, Bronchitis, if it 
do not end, as it commonly does, in 
Consumption. Let everyone, therefore, 
beware of a Slight Cold, remembering 
the well-known lines of Dr. Darwin — 

" Ills, small at first, grow 
And slowly cat their ss 
Thus by succes ivc thi 
Till health and peace c 

In the treatment of this complaint it 
is needful to gently act upon the bowels 
with Mountain Flax Pills, taking a good 
dose of Linseed Compound at bed-time, 
and repeating in half-doses when the 
chest is irritable during the day. 
Directions with each bottle. 



ger by delay, 
tnd cankering way ; 
; the frame is torn, 
lind alike arc tone.' 



Sold by Chemists everywhere. 



Beware of Imitations. 



Sole Proprietors— KAY BROTHERS LTD.. STOCKPORT. 




Made from MASON'S EXTRACT OF HERBS. QUENCHES 
THE THIRST — COOLS THE BODY — SATISFIES THE 
PALATE — USED IN THOUSANDS OF HOMES where no 
other summer beverage is consumed or thought of. The most 
delicious Botanic Beer you ever tasted in your life. 

SEND TWO STAMPS TO-DAY 

TOGETHER WITH THIS COUPON — FOR A SMALL SAMPLE BOTTLE, suffi- 
cient to make ONE GALLON, and a copy of our Booklet "HINTS ON BREWING." 



NEWBALL & MASON, Nottingham. 

Gentlemen, — Please send me a Bott'.e of your famous Extract of 
Herbs with "HINTS ON BREWING," for which I enclose 
2 penny stamps. 



ADDRESS 

1914 Almanacks 



The watchword n tens of thousands of homes all over the world is 

GOOD! IT'S MASON'S! 

Remember ! Mason's Herb Beer is quite non-intoxicating, 
being prepared from the concentrated essences of such 
invaluable herbs as Yarrow, Horehound, Comfrey, Dandelion, 
, etc. Economical too. Only think ! You can make 8 Gallons 
of Delicious Herb Beer with a 6d. Bottle of Mason's 
Extract of Herbs. 

8 GALLONS for 6<L 

WORTH TRYING TO-DAY. 



NEWBALL 8 MASON, 

NOTTINGHAM. 



*ww*i*w««ram»«''-y.ittiwM«ii«b^^ Tlm Ji Tii i l i Bnuii «=—»■»»«■— * 



"The Gardener's Passport to 
fame— A Tin of CLAY'S 
FERTILIZER." — 

The Nurseryman 
and Seedsman. 




"There is nothing like 
CLAY'S to buck thinga 
up." — The Fntit-Grower, 





He had a lovely Garden — The 
Flowers] were superb, the Vege- 
tables magnificent — 

OF COURSE 

His Garden was the envy of all 
his neighbours and friends, -who 
wondered what he did to get such 
wonderful results — 

OF COURSE 

One day he divulged the secret. 
" That's simple enough, I just use 
CLAY'S"— 

OF COURSE 

And now they are all using it — 
OF COURSE! 

Are YOU going to get some? — 

OF COURSE! 



Fu I Directions for using CLA Y'S FERTILIZER are given in the 

HORTICULTURAL WONDERBOOK 

Containing 332 pages, packed lull ol the most 
useful information lor gardeners, known as — 

CLAY'S SUCCESSFUL GARDENING 

5th Edition. Illustrated with Coloured and other Plates, and Bound 
in Clo:b. Price ONE SHILLING NET, post free, or of Seedsmen. 

Its Contributions are by the Ablest Writers of the Day. It is an Up-to-Date work 

dealing with the Culture of Flowers, Fruits and Vegetables, and includes articles upon 

Exhibiting, Judging, and Growing for Market. 



Use CLAY'S FERTILIZER and follow the Book. 

Write tor Prices of Crushed Bones, Bone Meal, and other Manures, Chemicals, etc. 



CLAY& 



Manure Manufacturers and Bone Crushers, 

, STRATFORD, LONDON, E. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



ii. The Brechin Almanac and Directory for 191 4. 

Watchmaker, Jeweller, and Optician, 
St. James's Place (Opposite Royal Bank) Brechin. 

Has a Large and Selected Stock of First-Clasa Watches, Clocks, and 
Jewellery. The Newest Designs in Silver and Electro Plate. 

Engagement and Wedding Rings and Keepers. Spectacles and Opera 
Glasses. Particular attention given to Repairs of every description. 

Established 1867 

FISH^OmjRY^GME&RABBm 

A Specialty in Seasonable Line-Caught Fish, Dressed and Filleted on 

shortest notice. 

Country-Reared Chickens Trussed to Order — always the Choicest Stock 

on hand. 
Country Eggs received daily from the best farms in the surrounding 

district. 

The Finest Class of all kinds of Game in their respective seasons. 

Always arriving a Fresh Supply of Rabbits — Quality Unsurpassed 

ALL ORDERS DELIVERED PROMPTLY — 

Agents for Spratt's Patent Game and Poultry Meals, and all their other 
well-known Specialities, 



Wholesale and Retail Fish, Poultry, Game, and Rabbit Merchant, 

9 ST. DAVID STREET, BRECHIN. 

Telephone, 097. Telegrams— " FINDL AY, POULTERER, BRECHIN." 

Established 1833. 



Tailors, Clothiers, and Gentlemen's Outfitters, 
2 Swan Street, Brechin. 



LIVERY, HIGHLAND COSTUME AND HABIT MAKERS. 



Advertisements. 



3SstabEi#e& 1840. 

James Jenkins, 

(Successor to THOMAS FERGUSON) 

BOOTMAKER, 

6 SWAN STREET, BRECHIN 

A Large Selection from Best Makers of Ladies' and Gent.'s Best and 
Medium Class Walking and Dress Boots and Shoes always in Stock. 

Agent for the Cinderella and "K" Boots and Shoes. 




<§ 



Established 1884. 

J. C. MIDDLETON, 

H*Cctm & Qecovatxve ^ovtse fainter, 
City Hall Buildings, Swan Street. 

Latest Styles ia Paperhangings at Lowest Possible Prices 
Estimates given for all Classes of Work. 



Qs 



Established 1780. 



LIST OF SPECIAL OLD WHISKIES. 













Per Gal. 


Per Bo*. 


Clynelish 








... 35 /.. 


4/2 


Glengrant 










.. 2 5 /- 


4/2 


Old Highland 










24/. 


4/- 


Old North Port 










22/- 


3/8 


Old Glencadam 










22/- 


3/8 


C. M. & S. Blend 










20/6 


3/5 


The Famed Greer 


Label, Bonded 1902 


22/- 


3/S 


Agent for A. 


Melrose 


& 


Coy's 


E( 


linburgh ' 


lea. 



C. MITCHELL & SON, 

Family Grocers and Wine Merchants, 

3 S"W\A.:N" STBBET. 



Ihe Brechin Almanac and Directory for 19 H. 



GEO. W. MITCHELL 

(Late G. GALL), 
BOOT AND SHOE MAKER, 

14 HIGH STREET, BRECHIN. 



Large Selection from Best Makers of Ladies' and Gent, 's Walking 
and Dress Boots and Shoes 

Repairs Executed at Moderate Charges 

Agent for Bective and for Allan's Edinburgh Boots 



WILLIAM HENDRY, 

BOOKSELLER & STATIONER, 

City Hall Buildings, 

* BRECHIN. * 



J. DAVIDSON, Saddler, 

19 St. David Street, Brechin. 



Orders Neatly and Promptly Executed. 



Advertisements. 



M. B. STEPHEN, 

(Successor to Miss BRECHIN), 

LADIES' BOOT 81 SHOE WAREHOUSE, 
5 Church Street, Brechin. 

Established 1823, 



WALTER HUTTON, 

Baker and Purveyor, 

City Restaurant, 31 High Street. 

MARRIAGES, PICNICS, AND SOIREES CONTRACTED FOR. 
CHARGES MODERATE. 



Established 1826. 




BUTCHER, 

(Son of the Late Samuel Strachan). 

Telephone No- 39- 

16 HIGH STREET, BRECH IN, & 26 HI OH STREET, EDZELL 

T^IMIIES G- IE ILL ATLT, 

Bread and Pastry Baker and Confectioner, 
45 High Street, Branch & Dining Rooms, 22 <& 26 St. David Street, 

BEE CHIN. 

MARRIAGES, SOCIALS, dkc, Catered for at Reasonable Prices. 

CAKES of every description ahvays fresh. 

MORNING ROLLS delivered daily to all parts of the toton. 



VI. 



The Brechin Almanac and Directory for 1914- 



ALEX. BZH J FOBD ; 

Baker and Confectioner, 

28 HIGH STREET, BRECHIN. 



CAKES— Pastry, Seed, Plum, Madeira, Sponge, and Rice. 

Marriage and Christening Cakes tastefully ornamented. Infants' 

Rusks. Tea Bread and Biscuits of all kinds. 

Short Bread. Dishes Covered, &c. 



dfc 



(MEMBER OF THE PHARMACEUTICAL SOCIETY) 

Dispensing and Family Chemist, 

(From Messrs. DunGan, Flockhart, & Co., Edinburgh), 

8 High Street, Brechin. 

Telephone No. 58. 



Established 1861 




J 

HAIRDRESSERS AND TOBACCONISTS, 

8 SWAN STREET, BRECHIN. 



Try the Far-Famed Dalhousie Mixture 
and Cigarettes —Registered. 

Agent for Loeuie & Co.'s Pipes. 
llitrge ^Usovtmmt of |£aaics' $air Stotttlus and .Season's £Uto #rrfn»us. 

COMBS AND BRUSH£S IN GREAT VARIETY. 



Advertisements. 



TELEPHONE No 12 



CROWN HOTEL, 

ST. DAVID STREET, BRECHIN. 

FAMILY AND COMMERCIAL. 

For Tourists, Motorists, and Cyclists. 



MODERATE TARIFF ON APPLICATION. 



WINES AND SPIRITS OF THE BEST QUALITY ONLY. 

HORSES AND CARRIAGES OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 
FOR HIRE 

G- .&. RAGE. 
OPEN AND CLOSED MOTOR OARS FOR HIRE. 



Geo. A. Moir, 

Watchmaker, Jeweller, & Optician, 

36 St. David Street, 



BRECHIN 



GEORGE GUTHRIE, 

26 PANMURE STREET, BRECHIN, 

Sight Testing Optician, Watchmaker, & Jeweller. 

Wadding Presents in Gold, Silver, and Silver-plate 

Edzell Branch— 17 HIGH STREET, EDZELL. 

GOSS'S HERALDIC "EDZELL ARMS" PORCELAIN WARE. 
TUgfii'Tesimg in 'Brechin Daily, and aTT-dzell on Wednesdays.' 

AW himls'_ of^Repafrrs a Speciality - . .:■..... 



viii. The Brechin Almanac and Directory for 1914- 

EMIGRATION. 



Do You Intend to Emigrate? 

IF SO, APPLY TO * 

BLACK & JOHNSTON, 

LICENSED EMIGRATION AGENTS, 
40 HIGH STREET, BRECHIN, 

Who are appointed Agents for, and will supply all Information 

regarding the following Lines of Steamers :— 
ANCHOR LINE of Steamers for America, India, and the 

Mediterranean. 
ALLAN LINE from Glasgow and Liverpool to Quebec, Montreal, 

Boston, &c. 
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY COY., from Liverpool to 

Quebec, Montreal, and " Round the World" Tours. 
CUNARD LINE for Boston and New York. 
DONALDSON LINE from Glasgow to Quebec, Montreal, &c. 
AMERICAN LINE from Liverpool and Southampton to New York. 
ROYAL LINE from Bristol to Quebec, Montreal, &c. 
WHITE STAR LINE from Liverpool, to New York, South Africa, 

Australia, and New Zealand. 
WHITE STAR-DOMINION LINE from Liverpool to New York 

and Canada. 
THE UNION-CASTLE MAIL STEAMSHIP COY. LINE from 

Southampton to South and East Africa. 
ORIENT LINE from Loudon to Australia, Tasmania, and New 

Zealand. 
NEW ZEALAND SHIPPING COY. 
SHAW T SAVILL & ALBION COY., Limited. 
ROYAL MAIL STEAM PACKET COY. 
P. & O COY., &c, &c. 
ABERDEEN LINE, PACIFIC STEAM NAVIGATION COY., 

LAMPORT & HOLT, NEDERLAND LINE, &c, &c. 



Railway Tickets issued to all Parts. 

GOODS FORWARDED TO ALL PARTS OF THE WORLD 
AT LOWEST RATES. 

Quotations given for Freight, Insurance, &c. 

Passengers should ask for our special Baggage Insurance Termi 

r» E 2&!*ss . 40 HIGH STREET. 



Advertisements. 



ROBERT HAMPTON, 

(Late W. DUNCAN & Co.), 

Grocer, Tea, Wine, & Spirit Merchant, 

1 HIGH STREET, BRECHIN. 



REGISTERED PLUMBERS, ELECTRIC & HOTWATER ENGINEERS, 
32 MARKET STREET. 



BRANCH— MANSE ROAD, EDZELL. 



Agents and Fitters of the 

NEW AIR GAS MACHINES FOR PRIVATE INSTALLATIONS. 
Independent Hotwater Heating a Speciality. 

Orders in Town and Country promptly attended to. 
Telephone 1y1 



CHARLES MACDONALD, 

HAIRDRESSER AND TOBACCONIST, 
40 ST. DAVID STREET, BBECHIN. 

AH kinds of Cutlery Ground and Set. Ladies' Combings Made up. 

Umbrellas Re-Covered and Repaired, Charges Moderate. 



The Brechin Almanac and Directory for 1914. 



. ROSS, 

Family Grocer, Tea, Wine, and Spirit Merchant, 

27 HIGH STREET, BRECHIN. 

WINES, SPIRITS, AND MALT LIQUORS of Best Quality. 



ARTHUR DAVIDSON, 

Practical Cabinetmaker and Upholsterer, 

i ST. ANDREW'S STREET, 

BRECHIN. 

<«►♦♦. — — 

FURNITURE of Every Description 

ALWAYS KEPT IN STOCK. 
— -<*+«»- 

Jobbing punctually attended to. Funerals Conducted. 



■ 



< 



CHARLES KIDD, < 

LADIES' AND GBNT.'S 
TAILOR AND CLOTirtlER, 

85 HIGH STREET, BRECHIN. 



Advertisements. 



J. & W. FORD, 

24 HIGH STREET, BRECHIN. 



Ladies' and Children's Underclothing. Baby Linen. 
Wool, Hosiery, and Fancy Goods 

Traced and Finished Needlework. 

Agents for the Dundee Dye Works and Empress Laundry. 



SPECIAL VALUE "SCOTCH WHISKIES 



Buchanan's " Black and White " 

Do. " House of Commons '' 

Dewars' " White Label " 

Do. "Special" - - - - 
Johnnie Walker's" Kilmarnock '' 
Clynlish " 8 years old " - - - 
Bell's " Perth Extra Special '' - 
King's Liqueur .,-'_.- 

Old Glencadam - - 

Old North Port - 

The Famous B.O.B.S. Blend - 



Per Bottle, 4s 6d 
4s 
4s 6d 

4s 

3 s 9^ 
4s 6d 

4 s 

4s 6d 
3s 6d 
3s 6d 
3s8d 



ROBERT OSWALD, 

4 HIGH STREET, BRECHIN 

Telephone Nos. 27 and 27a. 



CHARLES THOMSON, 

PLASTERER AND CONCRETE WORKED. 

YARD AND HOUSE— HAST BANK. 



Orders in Town or Country punctually attended to. 



xii. The Brechin Almanac and Directory for 191J/.. 

John Anderson & Son, 

WHOLESALE GROCERS & TEA MERCHANTS, 
MARKET STREET, BRECHIN. 



SALT IMPOBTEES. 



Gloves 


HATS. TIES. GLOVES. 


Umbrellas 

Flannels 

Flannelettes 

Linens 

Linings 

Hosiery 

Ready-Mades 

Tailoring 

Ladies' Costumes 


M. BEATON, 

DRAPER, 
The Corner, Brechin. 


&c. 


CAPS. COLLARS. BRACES 



Blankets 

Bedcovers 

Bed Ticks 

Sheets 

Curtains 

Blinds 

Floorcloth 

Linoleum 

Hearth Rugs 

Door Mats 

. &c. 



CHARLES DAVIDSON, 

Monumental Sculptor. 



Original and Artistic Designs in Memorial Tablets, Headstones, 
and Crosses in Gianite, Marble, and Freestone. 

LETTER-CUTTING IN ALL MATERIALS, IK TOWN OR COUNTRY, 

PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 



REPAIRING. CLEANING, RESTORING. 

Designs and Estimates Given. 
PERSONAL ATTENTION IN ALL DEPARTMENTS. 



ADDRESS- 

SOUTHESK STREET, BRECHIN, 

(adjoining public library). 
Branch Showyard — Corner of Union Street and Southesk Street. 



Advertisements. 



JOLLY'S HOTEL, 

CLERK STREET, BRECHIN. 

Every Comfort and Accommodation for Visitors, Tourists, 

and Pic-Nic Parties. 

BREAKFASTS, LUNCHEONS., DINNERS, TEAS, & SUPPERS 

AT MODERATE CHARGES. 



Established 1834. Telephone 92. 

JAMES KiNNEAR & SO/V, 

PLUMBERS, GASFITTERS, BELLHANGERS, SANITARY, 
HYDRAULIC, AND HOT WATER ENGINEERS, 

27 MARKET STREET, BRECHIN. 



Domestic Hotwater and Hydraulic Ram Water Supplies 

have special attention. 

All Orders in Town or Country Promptly Attended to. 



GORDON & ROSS, 

CONTRACTORS & JOBBING MASONS, 

45 and 47 UNION STREET, BRECHIN. 

All Orders in Town and Country promptly attended to. 



House Addresses— 151 Montrose Street and 20 Kinnaird Place. 



DAVID SHERRET & SON, 

Locksmiths & Blacksmiths. 

Grates and Ranges Supplied, and Repaired. 

Special Machinery for Grinding and Repairing Lawn Mowers. 
Spare Parts for Principal Makes of Machines kept in Stock. 

Address— 6 CLERK STREET, BRECHIN. 



xiv. 7 he Brechin Almanac and Directory for 19 H. 

THE BRECHIN 

AGRICULTURAL & TRADING CO. 

Have always on hand a Large Stock of 

Artificial Hanures 



INCLUDING 



Our Famed Special Potato Manure, 

Grain Manure, Turnip Manure, 

Pure Dissolved Bones, Bone Meal, 

Superphosphates, &c. ; 

ALSO, 

LINSEED CAKE, COTTON CAKE, 
Bran, Treacle, Locust Beans, &c. 

TERMS ON APPLICATION. 



i--\.xw%%%% 



ALEX. GRAY, Manager. 



Advertisements. 



xv. 



CTJ^IMIIES BAEEIB, 

(Incorporating Christie &. Cameron), 

Cabinetmakers, Upholsterers, and Complete House 

Furnishers, Funeral Undertakers, Auctioneers, and 

Valuators, 

CLERK STREET, BRECHIN. •< 



Telephone, 32 and 32a. 



Telegrams— "Barrie, Furnisher, Brechin." 



DAVID COOPER, 

Cabinetmaker and Upholsterer, 
MAISONDIEU LANE, 

Market Street, 

:: :: BRECHIN. 



W 



WILLIAM HAMPTON 

Contractor ana jobbing Slater. 



OHIIVEIN-Ersr SWEBPIITG- XJIT3DE]K.T^.K:E3Sr 



All Orders in Town & Country Promptly Attended to. 

Yard— WILSON'S PARK. House— 25 DAMACRE ROAD. 



xvi. The Brechin Almanac and Directory for 191 4- 




E 



Hotel, 



MARKET STREET, 
BRECHIN. 

This HOTEL, which is now under new Proprietorship, has under- 
gone Extensive Alterations, and is replete in everything necessary 
for a FIRST-CLASS HOTEL. 

LIQUORS OF THE BEST QUALITY ONLY KEPT IN STQCK. 
Served under Personal Supervision. 

Large Hall for Meetings and Supper Parties at Moderate Charges. 

MARQUEE ON HIRE. 
STABLING and HIRING in connection with the Hotel. 



WM. BALHARRY, Jun., Proprietor. 



D. & J. A. HUTCHEON 

(Sons of the Late D. HUTCHEON), 

PLAIN AND DECORATIVE HOUSE PAINTERS, 

15 ST. DAVID STREET, BRECHIN, 

^USTID HIGH ST IRE IE T, BDZBLL. 



'Phone 62. 

JAMES LAMB, 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL BUTCHER, 

8 PANMURE STREET, BRECHIN. 

B'.vvags a large selection of JSutcber /iJVeat. Hbe verg ffinest 
' ' <siualfts~at dlboDetate prices. 



Advertisements. 



R. J. & J. Bruce, 

JOINERS, CABINETMAKERS, AND UPHOLSTERERS, 
Bank Street and Southesk Street, Brechin. 



Carefully Selected Stock of Furniture. 

Jobbing in alt its Branches promptly attended to. 

JOHN WILSON, Cycle Agent, 

202 MONTROSE STREET, BRECHIN. 

CYCLES ON HIRE. CYCLES REPAIRED. 

Large Stock of New & Second-Hand Cycles for Sale at Moderate Prices. 

ANY MAKE OF CYCLE CAN BE SUPPLIED TO ORDER. 



A Variety of Phonographs and Records to be Sold Cheap. 

J. B. MELDRUM & COY., 

WASTE MEEOHANTS, 

34 CITY ROAD, BRECHIN. 



HOUSEHOLD WASTE, BABBIT SKINS, <&c.,unll be sent for on 

receipt of P.C. HIGHEST PRICES GIVEN. 

!3r ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. =f2| 



ESTABLISHED 1812. 



"SJlvtrser^men, ^eeosmen, mtd ^tfortsfs, 

DEN NURSERY, BRECHIN. 

Fruit Trees, Roses, Shrubs, etc., in all leading varieties. 

Vegetable and Flower Seeds of finest strains. 

Cut Flowers, Wreaths, Crosses, etc. Inspection invited. 



xviii. The Brechin Almanac and Directory for 1914.. 



JAMES PATERSON, 
newsagent, Cobacconist, § fancp 6oods Dealer, 

ii HIGH STREET, BRECHIN. 



ail DailB anO l&eeklg papers delivered punctually tbrougbout 
tbe (Town anO District 



M. MORE, 



TOBACCONIST & STATIONER, 



6 Montrose Street, Brechin. 



Choicest Cigars and Cheroots. Finest Snuffs and Tobaccos. 
Cigarettes Sold either by Weight or Packet. 

Agent for Thomsons' Ltd., Dye Works, Perth. 



Telephone 59. 



JAMES EDWARDS, Plumber, 

SANITARY, HEATING, LIGHTING, AND VENTILATING ENGINEER. 



ALL ORDERS RECEIVE PROMPT ATTENTION. 



40 Union Street and Summerbank Lane. 

Singers' Sewing Machines. 

Can be had for Cash or by Easy Weekly and Monthly Payments. 

SPECIAL REDUCTIONS FOR CASH. 

W. ESPLIN, Sole Agent, 67 Montrose Street, 

BRECHIN. 



Advertisements. 



p f MEET ME AT THE % % 

BRIDGEND BAR 

WHY? BECAUSE 

The Finest 90/- ALES are Served in Sparkling 
Condition, and WINES and SPIRITS are a 
Speciality. 

Proprietor, D. CLARK. 
_<s^«Rfcr REID & BARRIE, 

56 & 58 HIGH STREET, 

$*s&8£3^&g&^ Brechin. 

Family Butchers and Cattle Dealers. 

COIINED BEEF AND PICKLED TONGUES KEPT IN STOCK. 




MO N 7 ROSE STREET SA IV MILLS. 

GEORGE OGILVIE, 

Joiner, House Carpenter, Wood Merchant, and 
Funeral Undertaker. 

86 MONTROSE STREET, BRECHIN. 



The Brechin Almanac and Directory for 19 H. 



Established over Half-a-Century. — 

RAMSAY KIDD, 

Boot and Shoe Maker, 
74 HIGH STREET, BRECHIN. 

Large Assortment of Boots, Shoes, and Slippers. 

ALL KINDS MADE TO MEASURE, 




DENTISTRY. 

WM. S. MACDUFF, 

SURGEON DENTIST, 
THE LINDENS, 

St. Ninian's Square, 

* BRECHIN. * 



W. C. WISHART, ^r 

Tea, Wine, and Spirit Merchant, 
17 CITY ROAD, BRECHIN. 



Advertisements. 



JOSEPH ESPLIN, 

FAMILY GROCER, WINE AND SPIRIT MERCHANT, 

17 River Street, Brechin. 



Finest OLD MATURED BRANDIES, WINES, and SPIRITS 

only Stocked, and all MALT LIQUORS of the Best, always In 

Sparkling Condition. 



A PERFECT FIT 

Is Essential to Foot Style. 

We have studied this matter care- 
fully, and are experts in the art 
of Fitting. 

IT This Style is a neat Walking 
Shoe, Light, Durably Built, and well 
Proportioned. Our Price represents 
exceptional value. 




PRICE ONLY 4111. 



-e_J===!N»MS==**__S>- 



W. P. DAVIDSON 



THE SOUTH PORT 
BOOT STORE. 



Corner of City Road and Union Street. 



JOHN BELL, TOBACCONIST , 

115 HIGH STREET, BRECHIN. 



Finest Cigars, Tobaccos, and Snuffs. 

Newspapers and Periodicals supplied immediately on Publication. 



xxii. The Brechin Almanac and Directory for 1914- 

R. & A. FIN LAY, 

Rope and Cu)tne rftamifxtasrers, 

SHEEP NETS. PLOUGH LINES. HALTER ROPES, 

FANCY SHOP TWINES OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

Rope Works — Montrose Street, Brechin. 

PURE, DELICIOUS, & HEALTHFUL. 



L 



AMB'S 
EMONADE 



Excels in all the essentials of a good 
Table Water. 



Won its pAVOUR . 
By its F LAVOUR. 



DAVID LAMB, 

CRATED WATER WORKS, BRECHIN. 

JOHN COLLIE, 
BOOT AND SHOE MAKER, 

36 Market Street, Brechin. 

Customer Work, Repairs, and Country Orders promptly attended to. 
Every Description of Heady-Made Stock at Moderate Prices. 




Advertisements. 



EAST END BAR, 



"THE 

corner; 



-FOR- 



SPIRITS, BEERS, and WINES. 



POPULAR PRICES- 



WM. FINDLAY, Manager. 



€3 



D. A. CRABB, 

BUILDER, 
■*** EAST BANK. ** 

JOBBING PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO 



9 



BIRSE 



CLOTHIER, HATTER, AND OUTFITTER, 
14, 16, and 18 Swan Street, Brechin. 

HIGH-CLASS TAILORING IN ALL ITS BRANCHES- 

LADIES' TAILOR-MADE GARMENTS A SPECIALITY. 

John Oswald & Son, 

GENERAL BLACKSMITHS, 

Horse-Shoers and Implement Makers, 

DAMACRE ROAD. 



Railings and Gates of any kind contracted for. 

Jobbing of all sorts punctually attended to. 



xxiv. The Brechin Almanac and Directory for 1914- 

To Forfarshire Friends 
at Home and Abroad. 



We hold one of the Largest Stocks in the County of 

SCARCE SECOND-HAND BOOKS 

Relating to Forfarshire, 

INCLUDING 

Jervise's Land of the Lindsays, 

„ Memorials of Angus and Mearns, 
„ Epitaphs and Inscriptions, 
Edwards' Modern Scottish Poets, 
Black's History of Brechin, 

And many Out-of-Print Books published in Brechin, 
Forfar, Arbroath, Montrose, &c. 

SEND FOR LIST FROM 

BLACK & JOHNSTON, 

40 HIGH STREET, BRECHIN. 



Advertisements* 



A. & W. Whitton, 

BUTCHERS, 
95 Montrose Street and 3 Church Street. 

Always a Large Selection of the Finest Butcher Meat in the City. 

ZE3I. IsTIOOLL, 

REGISTRY FOR SERVANTS, 

ST. DAVID STREET, BRECHIN. 

ICES FOR DANCES SfVEETS, CREAMS, 

AND AT HOMES, AND JELLIES, 

MADE TO ORDER. MADE TO ORDER. 



Millinery. 



F. CAIRD, 



33 ST. DAVID STREET, 
BRECHIN. 



grocer & provision merchant, 

2 St. Mary Street, Brechin. 

— *•♦*> ■ — p* 

3FTS3BE &.TXT> -STSEG-aEITASBX^aES IN SEASON 



xxvi. The Brechin Almanac and Directory for 191 Jf.. 



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Advertisements. xxvii. 



SEROT. KIDD & SON. 



Dogcart or Waggonette meets each Train. 




Parties driven either Count-) ij m 


Toum at a Reasonable Reite- 


Address— DAMACRE 


ROAD, BRECHIN. 


Vegetable and 


Flower Seeds 


BEST SELECTED STRAINS. 


Roses. Fruit Trees and Bushes. 


Bedding Plants. Wreaths, 


Crosses, Sprays, Shower Bouquets 


Buttonhole Bouquets. 





A. M. INGLIS, 

(Late Dickson & Tuknbull), 

21 CLERK STREET, BRECHIN. 

Established about 1745. 

^^OT^AJTJOES^- 

Considerable Reduction on Cwt. Bags. 

CHEAPEST POTATO SHOP IN TOWN ALL THE YEAR ROUND. 



HENDRY, 21 Union Street, Brechin. 



x-xviii. The Brechin Almanac and Directory for WlJf.. 



PANMURE HOTEL, 

EDZELL. 



d 




Healthiest Spot in Scotland 

Grand Scenery. Delightful Climate even in Winter. 
Clear Bracing Air. 

THE HOTEL CONTAINS SPACIOUS LOUNGE. 

Electric Light. Hot Water Radiators. 

Every Modern Comfort. Excellent Cuisine. 



b 



j&JEE EIOSESA-Ia RESORT 

For GOLFING (18 Hole Course). 

MOTORING (Motor Garage and Pit). 

" Listed " Quarters of A.A., and other Motor Clubs. 

Good Skating and Curling in the Neighbourhood. 

Tennis and Bowling Greens. 

FISHING. 



Send for Illustrated Tariff from 

CHARLES A. THIEM, Proprietor. 



Advertisements. xxix. 




THE POPULAR HOUSE IS 

HGNEYMAN'S : 



^^SP RAILWAY TAVERN 



«-%- 



39 and 41 Damagre Road, Brechin. 

McEWAK'S FAMED EDINBURGH 90/- BEER on Draught, in Sparkling Condition, 

Admitted to be the Best in the Citj 7 . 

Wines and Spirits of the Finest Qualitj- only Kept. 

BREAKFASTS, LUNCHEONS, DINNERS, AND TEAS SUPPLIED. 

ALEX. HONEYMAN, Proprietor. 

i C. LINDSAY, 



JOHN YOUNG, 

PAINTER and PAPERHANGER, 

27 MONTROSE STREET, BRECHIN. 

Also at 24 GARDYNE STREET, FRIOCKHEIM. 

pictubes ie 1 :f?,-A.:m: IE 3D . 




CYCLE AGENT, &c, 

Montrose Street, Brechin. 



EGGO'S LIQUID METAL POLISH, 2d. per $ Pint. 
GRAMOPHONES AND RECORDS, ETC. 

CAS MANTLES AND ALL. FITTINGS KEPT IN STOCK. 



xxx. The Brechin Almanac and Directory for 191 J/.. 

I H. FERGUSON & COMPANY 

Plumbers, 6asfUter$, ana electricians, 
Rot lilater ana Sanitarp engineers. 



Electric Light, Telephone, and Bells Fitted up. 



All Ordeis in Town or Country Carefully Attended to. 



MARTIN'S LANE (Near Post Office), 

IBIRIE OH I IT. 



& 


M 


. Milne, 


+#• 


tobacconist, 


Confectioner, and Newsagent, 




St. 


Ninian's Place, 

BRECHIN. 





W. BLACK & SON, 

Joiners, House Carpenters, and Wood Merchants, 
OFFICE— CLERK STREET. 



Advertisements'. 



xxxi. 



Messrs THOS. MUIR, SON & PATTON 



(LIMIT BID), 



Coal Merchants & Carting Contractors, 

IB IR, JE C H I 3SI\ 

Beg to intimate that they are in a position to supply 

Finest Scotch and English Coals 

at Very Reasonable Prices. 



gteaxn anb §matC gloafs aCtt>cn;>s on fyanb, 



a. EDGAR, Aaent. 



OFFICE— RAILWAY STATION. 



WILLIAM BLACK & SON, 

Cabinetmakers and Upholsterers, 

Practical Designers in Decoration and Artistic Furnishings. 




Licensed Appraisers, Funeral Undertakers, 
30 CLERK STREET, BRECHIN, 



xxxii. The Brechin Almanac mid Directory fer 1914- 

The Brechin Savings Bank 

Established 1855 
Certified under Act of Parliament 



The Head Office, 8 St. Mary Street, 

OPEN 

Tuesdays, 1 1 to 3 ; Tuesday Evenings, 6 to 8; 
Friday Evenings, 6 to 8. 



The Branch Office, 41 High St.Edzell, 

OPEN - 

Wednesday Evenings, 6 to 9 ; Saturday 
Evenings, 5 to 9 o'clock. 



DEPOSITS received of ONE SHILLING up to £50 in one year 

and £200 in all. 

The Rate of Interest is £2 10s per cent, per annum. 



YEAR ENDED 20th NOVEMBER 1913. 
Total Funds, - - - £106,485. 

Amount Due to Depositors, - - £105,460. 

Surplus,- £1025. 
Number of Depositors - - - 2988. 



TRUSTEES AND MANAGERS. 

Rev. Walter W. Coats, D.D., President. 
David Duke, Esq., J. P., Vice-President. 
Messrs. William Johnston, George A. Scott, Andrew Robertson, 
James Young, William Smart, James Scott, Rev. Alex. Middleton, 
Alex. Peter, G. Monro Scott, Martin B. Lamb, James S, Lindsay, 
David Murray, Brechin ; Messrs. James C Robertson, Rev. T. C. 
Sturrock, George Kidd. and Rev. David Williamson, B. D., Edzell. 

The British Linen Bank, Brechin Bankers, 

William Anderson, Acfomry and Secretary. 

Francis C. Anderson, Assistant Actuary. 

Thomas Benilett, Receiver at Edzell Branch. 

David S. Barrie, Auditor. s- J " 



%.... £ 



CYCLE AN D MOTOR AGENT. 

DUNCAN'S 




CYCLE SHOWROOMS, 

48 ST. DAVID STREET & 3 ST. MARY STREET. 



■•♦•- 



Sole Agent for the Cream of Cycle Makers for Brechin and Edzell. 

Rudge-Whitworth, Royal Enfield, Raleigh, 

Calcott, Ariel, Centaur ; 

also the Royal Esk — Our own Make. — 

Fitted with Cambridge Tyres, and Genuine Sturraey-Archer 
Three-Speed Gear. Fully Guaranteed. World's Best Value. 

£5 19s 6d. 

Any Make of Bicycle can be supplied — Prices from £4 4s. 

Largest and most Up-to-Date Stock in Forfarshire, 
Up-to-Date Stock of Accessories. Official Repairer to S.C. U. 

Any Make of Motor Bicycle supplied. 

WORDS FOR CYCLISTS. 

Don't run away with the idea that paying what is known as a fancy- 
price must of necessity involve the procuring of a reliable machine. When 
buying your cycle, don't take it on any man's advice, use your a 
judgment. You don't want a Bone-Shaker — there are sufficient un* 
downs in the world already. You don't want a machine. +b«- 
which you discover to be hard labour ! , You don'' 
you cannot mount without p;; ! -tjng an accident ir- 
pocket, and bidding a tearful adie^ to your fr* 1 
don't want any of these. 

What you do want is a machine upon 
dependence, reliable in every sense of the 
will bring pleasure in the purchase, and r 
I can sell you this machine ! Call and sef 
be bound to admit that for cycles and an 

DUNCAN'S IS THE HO 



AN CHOR L INE 

Glasgow and New York 

Via MO VILLE- WEEKLY. 

FARES — Saloon, £14 and upwards ; Second Class, £10 and upwards, 
according to Steamer ; Third Class, £7 6s ; Second and Third 
Class Passengers Booked to Boston and Philadelphia without 
Extra Charge. Bedding and all Requisites Free of Charge. 

Passengers Booking direct by Through Rates to points in Canada, the 
Third Class Through Rate to New York is £6 10s. 



Glasgow, Manchester, and Liverpool 

To GIBRALTAR, EGYPT, and BOMBAY-Fortnightly 
Service. 

Saloon Rates of Passage Money from Liverpool to Bombay and 
Karachi, £41 5s Single; Return, £63 16s. To Port Said, £15 8s Single ; 
Return ,£27 10s. To Cairo, £16 10s Single ; Return, £29 14s. To 
Suez, £16 10s Single ; Return, £29 14s. Reduction to Families paying 
three or more full fares. 



Glasgow and Liverpool 

To EGYPT and CALCUTTA-Every Ten Days. 

By ANCHOB-BPOCKLEBAWK LINE of Steamers. 

Saloon Rates of Passage Money from Liverpool to Calcutta, £31 7s 
Single. To Port Said, £11 Single. To Cairo, £12 2s Single, To Suez, 
£12 2s Single. No Return Tickets issued by Anchor-Brocklebank Liae 

earners. 



'HOR T TNE (HFNDERSON BROTHERS) 

t Building, Water Street, Liverpool ; 

- ; Ltadenhall Chambers, 4 St. Mary 

omrnercisil Street, Dundee ; 20 Foyle 

Anchor Line Buildings, 12 to 16 St. 



40 HIGH STREET, BRECHIN.